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2013 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-29
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

8—14 July

From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Dendrobium delacourii
Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2013 16:40

Hello everyone,

Here's a picture of my Dendrobium delacourii. This year, the spikes are bigger than the new pseudobulb that is bearing them.

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f359/rockhop/IMG_1697b_zps8fb835d8.jpg

Best regards,
Esther

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From: SARAH Czechmate
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 04:40

Hello everyone!

I'm Sarah. I've been lurking for a while now and have decided to finally post.

Has anyone had success using cinnamon as a fungicide? My phals have fungus gnats, but I don't want to use a chemical fungicide because I grow my phals inside and I have two small children. I'm hoping that watering with cinnamon-infused water and putting out sticky traps will take care of the problem.

Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you!

Sarah Lopusnikova
Bloomington, Minnesota

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From: Richard Baxter
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 11:35

Sarah
I think a lot of people use cinnamon as a fungicide but I am not sure about killing fungus gnats. I have tried cinnamon for several months alongside my old standard of yellow sulphur, and for me at least, I prefer the sulphur as more effective in my case. What cinnamon has going for it is the pleasant smell and that it is not as obtrusive on the plants as sulphur, but I am sure you will get a load of different opinions about this, and maybe with children around you would be better to stick with cinnamon.
Welcome in from the shadows!
Richard

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From: Peter Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 12:20

Hi Sarah,

I don't know what fungus gnats are, but I can tell you that cinnamon is an
excellent fungicide.

I use it for about 20 years or so by now and I'm happy with it. For every
cut on any of my orchids I put

Cinnamon powder on the cut and it protects the plant. Apparently nutmeg is
also good, but I have

not tried it yet.

Peter

Bloubergstrand

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From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Dendrobium delacourii
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 14:10

A real favourite of mine, ever since I saw it in the wild, in an area where there had been a forest fire, and it was apparently the first to re-colonise the area. It was growing terrestrially, and lthophytically, and epiphytically (on trees which had lost their leaves and twigs, but not branches)and even growing on a stags horn fern − which must have ben an even earlier coloniser.
Such interesting flowers!

Geoff

Sent from my iPad

On 8 Jul 2013, at 16:43, Esther Koh wrote:

> Hello everyone,
>
> Here's a picture of my Dendrobium delacourii. This year, the spikes are bigger than the new pseudobulb that is bearing them.
>
> http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f359/rockhop/IMG_1697b_zps8fb835d8.jpg

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From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 14:15

I don't think this will work.
Cinnamon will work to stop rot on new cut surfaces, because the powder will dry them up. By the same argument any dry dusty powder will do this, although you would not want to use something which would go mouldy e.g. Flour. But say talc would do just as well for that.

Cinnamon is known (before it is processed and ground up) to have insecticidal properties, but I have never heard that it has any fungicidal properties.

I appreciate the desire to avoid poisons, but sometimes there is no alternative.

Geoff

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From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 14:20

And btw, sticky traps are to catch flying insects. Nothing to do with fungus !

And lastly − which should have ben first (!) welcome to the group.

Geoff

Sent from my iPad

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:40

Hello Sarah, and welcome to the group :-)

I hope the answers received so far to your question have helped but
just in case, there is an excellent article on fungus gnats at the
link below:

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05584.html

Do you actually have any fungus on your phals and/or the compost or
can you just see the fungus gnats flying around? I'm thinking one
approach would be to repot your plants, removing all the old compost
which will contain the gnat larvae and also use the sticky traps to
eliminate the gnats which are at the flying stage. It wouldn't hurt
to drench with a cinnamon solution, although I doubt it will get rid
of the gnat larvae − but you never know!

Hope that helps,

--

Tricia

Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

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From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 16:40

Is there such a thing as a fungus gnat ?
Moss gnats, yes − the larvae like the moistness. Fungus, yes, too . But the combination strikes my ear as not quite right.

However, I googled it, and found the Wikipedia reference helpful. Apparently they feed on microfungi , which is where the name comes from.
Incidentally, the Wiki' ref says harmless to plants, except small seedlings.

Probably what I call moss gnats are the same thing ?

Maybe the reason for my remarkable ignorance is that I never see them,under either name : never have, not in all my growing. I suggest that a teacupful of disinfectant per 50 gallon water tank, which I mostly use, is the reason I am ignorant of many problems.

Geoff

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From: Tina Stagg
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cinnamon as fungicide?
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 19:45

Hello Sarah

Are these what I call moss flies? I haven't seen any since I swapped from
fresh sphagnum to NZ dried moss.

I have never thought to put cinnamon actually in the pot, although I do use
it on cut pbulbs. I suppose a pinch mixed in with the compost might stop any
root rot and help to heal any damage: I feel an experiment coming on!

Tina

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From: Peter Fowler
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: First Flowering of Variegated Neo. Falcata
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 20:00

No text.

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From: Peter Fowler
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Neoinertia SP in New Pots
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 20:10

No text

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From: Horace Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: A miniature Vandaceous blue hybrid − Vasco Midnight Treasure.
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 20:35

The flowers are like a large Asctm curvifolium, but maybe one inch across, Interestingly the back of the flowers is a good blue, but the front a more dusky hue with a hint of pink.
The parentage is two Vasco hybrids crossed together − V.Tham Yeuen Hue x V. Broga Bluebell. Looking at the genetics, it is about 40% Rhy. coelestis which accounts for the colour, and about 15% Asctm curvifolium which must help keep the flowers -small since the rest of the bloodline is large Vandas − sanderiana, coerulea, and luzon.
A first flowering in my collection, grown from a 3 inch leaf-span seedling − now in a 4 inch basket, and maybe 6 inches or perhaps a bit bigger, leaf-span.
Not a showstopper, but a nice little feature of interest in my collection at the moment.

Geoff

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From: Peter Fowler
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Neoinertia SP in New Pots
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 23:50

Sorry....couldn't spell Neofinetia. Spell checker didn't pick that one up!
I'm lost without a spell checker.
Peter, Alton.
If you want any special pots made, then my friend can do them. He is a very talented potter/Artist.

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From: Peter Fowler
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Fwd: [OrchidTalk] Neoinertia SP in New Pots
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 23:50

Just to say the ones with the yellow leaves are 'not ill'. They are meant to be like that.
Peter, Alton.

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From: Geoff
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Neoinertia SP in New Pots
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2013 07:45

They look good But how will you repot when the time comes ; don't you think the roots may stick to the ceramic `?

geoff

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From: Richard Baxter
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Neoinertia SP in New Pots
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2013 10:00

I use terracotta pots wherever I can. Especially for my Odontoglossums
because they breathe, they absorb humidity that keeps the roots cool, and
they are stable for tall/large plants. In fact, bearing in mind that the
majority of orchids are epiphytic I can think of fewer more hostile surfaces
for roots than sterile smooth plastic pots. I always soak new pots for 48
hours prior to use to get rid of any salts. As for repotting, I have a very
old long thin steel bladed dinner knife which I slide down the side of a
moistened pot then work carefully round the entire edge. Roots come away
undamaged. Of course, all pots get sterilised with a bleach solution before
re-use.
Richard

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