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May 2013 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

15—21 May

From: Andy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Current Flowerings
Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 08:50

Nice plants Bill. I really like the Lycaste. Does it have a perfume of is
it another misnomer? I think that's the most obliging Max sanderiana I've
seen. The flowers are usually coming out anywhere but the top of the
basket.

Andy

Bill Haldane wrote re: [OrchidTalk] Current Flowerings

PLease find attached some photos of recent flowerings.
a) Paph. appletonianum v. harrisoniae
b) Lycaste aromatica
c) Onc. spectatissimum
d) and e) Maxillaria sanderiana
REgards Bill

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom
Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:25

Hi Andy,

Not quite sure about what has happened with your photos, but either your labels are really mixed up, or you uploaded the wrong files?

Nevertheless, they are all very pretty plants.

Francis

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom
Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 09:30

Hello again,

Andy, please, ignore my previous message. I don't know why, but for some reason, your message displayed the pictures from Bill's message instead of yours!!!

Francis

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From: Bill Haldane
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Current Flowerings
Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 11:10

Hi Andy,
Lyc. aromatica has a strong, almost spicy smell, during the day time.
Nice for a relatively small plant.
The Max. sanderiana is maybe looking for the light but I do agree it is
a disobliging plant to display. Mine has six flowers but they are
difficult to see all at once.
Regards Bill

On5/2013 08:53, Andy wrote:
> Nice plants Bill. I really like the Lycaste. Does it have a perfume
> of is it another misnomer? I think that's the most obliging Max
> sanderiana I've seen. The flowers are usually coming out anywhere but
> the top of the basket.
>
> Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Current Flowerings
Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 11:30

Just a question or two if I may Bill ?

What distinguishes the paph variety from the ordinary type ?

How do you grow the Oncidium ? I bought one recently, which came with two flower spikes ; I wonder if the treatment I think of giving will turn out correct ? Actually, this looks as though 20 years ago we would have called it an Odontoglossum , which I woulkd give a different treatment to an oncidium , but I hope to hear your views !

Super pics -lovely flowers.

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Bill Haldane
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Current Flowerings
Date: Thu, 16 May 2013 11:40

Hi Geoff,
The Paph. variety came labelled that way and I have no real way of
telling you what distiguishes it. The plant came from the collection of
Michael Potter of Lea Valley OS about three years ago.
The 'Oncidium' spectatissimum came to me from Ecuagenera labelled as
Odontoglossum spectatissimum several years ago. I changed its name in an
attempt to bring it up to date in terms of recent changes. It is grown
as you might expect for a rainforest Odont.. The flower colours, shape
and aspect in fact seem to show the family link to Oncidium.
Hope this clarifies things a little.
Best Regards Bill

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom
Date: Fri, 17 May 2013 11:10

Dear Andy,

Your photos look great! Which camera did you use?

Best regards,
Esther

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From: Andy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom
Date: Sat, 18 May 2013 13:10

Thanks Esther. They are taken with a Nikon D80 with a 60 mm Micronikkor macro lens. I need upgrade to something capable of photographing the tiny flowers I enjoy growing .. I have lots of pleuros that are a bit beyond this one.
I don¡¯on;t know what though. Any ideas anyone?

Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom
Date: Sun, 19 May 2013 02:10

The nikon micro, 60mm f2.8 is my lens of choice − the same one you have, I think. if you release the limit/full catch at the side, it will do full size images, at closest focus, when used on a 35mm film camera. The Nikon D 80 , like all the older Nikon digital cameras , maybe all the new ones too, I don't know that for sure, has a magnification factor of 1.6:1. This is because it only uses the central part of the lens to make the whole image , so the possible magnification then is actually 1.6:1. If you take a pic of a 10mm dia object, your actual image on the sensor will be 16mm dia.

I have used other micro/macro lenses. Tamron used to make a 90mm, but the term is used rather indiscriminately for anything which will do very close up work, and it is difficult to find anyone else quoting exact figures the way Nikon do.

Nikon used to do a specialist "booklet" − a maybe 4 page leaflet − explaining the possibilities for close up work with all their lenses, cameras etc. Basically you can go to using spacer rings behind the lens, often using adapters so as to use the lens reversed, or then to bellows. I did a lot of it at one time, but it needs a lot of patience as well as a deep wallet, and you run into all kinds of problems from a technical point, which I can't deal with here. I remember that at one point I bought some special software, and used a focusing slide to mount the whole contraption of lens, bellows and camera, so that I could take forty exposures successively, with the whole set of stuff moved a mm at a time, ever closer to the flower, and then combined them all with the software into a single image which would be focussed sharply all the way through the flower as it were. It ended up as days work for a single image ( my usual exaggeration, perhaps, but then I did stop for meals...).

At some point along that way I discovered that my life was being taken over by photography and my orchids were suffering. I had to make a serious choice which way to go, and I sold all the expensive and complicated kit, and went back to the simple Nikon micro.

But, each to his own. The best of luck either way , Andy .

Geoff.

Ps, to those to whom I may have mentioned it, the last, 4th so far, operation on my eye has I think, improved matters a lot, although I shan't be sure until I have been for the next hospital appointment on Monday, and the gas bubble in the eye has dissipated.

Sent from my iPad

On 18 May 2013, at 13:13, "Andy" wrote:

> Thanks Esther. They are taken with a Nikon D80 with a 60 mm
> Micronikkor macro lens. I need upgrade to something capable of
> photographing the tiny flowers I enjoy growing .. I have lots of
> pleuros that are a bit beyond this one.

> I don t know what though. Any ideas anyone?
>
> Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom: for Andy
Date: Sun, 19 May 2013 09:30

Another system ; I used this for a time when I was trying photograph spiders¡­
This uses two lenses back to back . The longer lens goes on the camera and a shorter one is mounted in reverse, using coupling rings in front of the long lens.
If you have a , say, 200mm lens on the camera, and a 50mm lens in front you get a 200:50 or 4:1 magnification − much more than you can get with any combination of rings or macro lenses.
But at least you have it easy working with plants in pots which you can bring in away from the wind, and which won't scuttle away and hide !
The two lens system − almost any two lens btw , means that you still get a very small f number, reciprocity failure, minute depth of field . I don't think you can avoid them with any kind of kit at all, or at least anything ordinary mortals can afford.
Hence the multiple exposures , digitally combined, selecting the sharp portions and discarding the rest, from all of them.How many exposures depends on how "deep" the image.
I think this is becoming quite common, and there are several software choices to do this . Maybe it is even in the latest Photoshop − I have not ventured very far with this yet .
Flash, probably two, to get some modelling is essential, and you may need to control the front lens independently since it will not be coupled to the camera AF or AE systems.
It gets quite technical, but you knew that. There are of course books about it − all mine got chucked out when I gave up on photography as a major occupier of my time − my books continually overflow the available space and I need to have a throw away every few months so it was good at that time to get rid of a whole shelf-ful !

I hope all my rambling on helps ; if you have any questions you know how to contact me.

Geoff

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From: Horace Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: more piccies
Date: Sun, 19 May 2013 10:30

5 plants here − the pics do seem to get jumbled up when I try and upload them in order . Sorry about that, I may learn to tame my Apple one day.

Leptotes bicolor perhaps magnificum or gigantea ? Bought as "large flowered form" and indeed the flowers are twice the size of my bog standard plant this year, although I think it has flowered a bit larger, but not this large, in the past. You will know which this is − bicolor is the clue.

Rodriguezia secunda . Hmm, well that might be the right name , or not. I collect this genus, and have flowered a couple of secundas in the past with three times as many flowers per spike, but half this size ; or were they really R.venusta ? Whatever the right name, they are jolly nice little flowers and last very well, maybe a month or more. Can't say that of the whole genus. I do love white flowers, and any touch of colour enhances that, the big yellow patch on the lip especially so.

Den amethystoglossa. An amazing 14 spikes . If only that would last for Malvern !. But alas, since taking this pic a week ago, there are now 3 or 4 spikes open, I fear it will be on its last legs in another month. Bang goes a ribbon, I think. But I got awards, cups etc for this plant at our Autumn show in September and Spring Show in February !Now, how can I get a few more plants to do this ?

Sievekingia fimbriata , which I read is probably an antecedent of Stanhopea, in genetic/genealogical terms. This is the third plant of this species I have had , after seeing what I thought was this species in Costa Rica . I now accept that this is the true plant, and what I saw was S.rheichenbachiana which is much more fimbriate than this one. Incidentally I can't think of any other fimbriata where it is the petals which are fringed − normally it is the lip. This plant has another 6 spikes visible, poking through the net pot, which btw is an 7 or 8cm size. Not long lasting, although better than Stanhopeas − 10 days if the weather remains poor, maybe 5 if it turned hot ( fat chance, it seems − now there's a thought , its an ill wind which blows no-one any good ! ).

Dendrobium moniliforme "Phyllis" HCC/AOS. Actually that HCC was got with flowers 3.7cm natural spread, whereas a couple of other forms got AM/AOS with 4.6 and 4.8cm flowers. My flowers are 4.7cm natural spread − so growing very well. I had a little discussion about this plant elsewhere, which is why I can trot out the figures. But this is a Japanese orchid, and I think our weather here is probably quite like theirs, whereas the awarded plant came from Florida which has different weather. So I put the improvement down to where I live.

All for now,

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: a.mckeown1208
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Currently in bloom
Date: Mon, 20 May 2013 20:25

Thanks Geoff for this information. I guess you confirm what I thought −
that either I need to spend a lot of time or a lot of money! Neither of
these are an option really at the moment. I will get some spacer rings
to see what happens. I like the idea of combining the sharpest planes
of a series of images − it's a good starting point to research and there
might be some better software to do that now. I think though the images
I hanker after making are probably done with some seriously expensive kit!

I hope all goes well at the hospital on Monday

Andy

On 19/05/2013 02:10, Geoff Hands wrote:
> The nikon micro, 60mm f2.8 is my lens of choice − the same one you
> have, I think. if you release the limit/full catch at the side, it
> will do full size images, at closest focus, when used on a 35mm film
> camera. The Nikon D 80 , like all the older Nikon digital cameras ,
> maybe all the new ones too, I don't know that for sure, has a
> magnification factor of 1.6:1. This is because it only uses the
> central part of the lens to make the whole image , so the possible
> magnification then is actually 1.6:1. If you take a pic of a 10mm dia
> object, your actual image on the sensor will be 16mm dia.
>
> I have used other micro/macro lenses. Tamron used to make a 90mm, but
> the term is used rather indiscriminately for anything which will do
> very close up work, and it is difficult to find anyone else quoting
> exact figures the way Nikon do.
>
> Nikon used to do a specialist "booklet" − a maybe 4 page leaflet −
> explaining the possibilities for close up work with all their lenses,
> cameras etc. Basically you can go to using spacer rings behind the
> lens, often using adapters so as to use the lens reversed, or then to
> bellows. I did a lot of it at one time, but it needs a lot of patience
> as well as a deep wallet, and you run into all kinds of problems from
> a technical point, which I can't deal with here. I remember that at
> one point I bought some special software, and used a focusing slide to
> mount the whole contraption of lens, bellows and camera, so that I
> could take forty exposures successively, with the whole set of stuff
> moved a mm at a time, ever closer to the flower, and then combined
> them all with the software into a single image which would be focussed
> sharply all the way through the flower as it were. It ended up as days
> work for a single image ( my usual exaggeration, perhaps, but then I
> did stop for meals...).
>
> At some point along that way I discovered that my life was being taken
> over by photography and my orchids were suffering. I had to make a
> serious choice which way to go, and I sold all the expensive and
> complicated kit, and went back to the simple Nikon micro.
>
> But, each to his own. The best of luck either way , Andy .
>
> Geoff.
>
> Ps, to those to whom I may have mentioned it, the last, 4th so far,
> operation on my eye has I think, improved matters a lot, although I
> shan't be sure until I have been for the next hospital appointment on
> Monday, and the gas bubble in the eye has dissipated.
>
> Sent from my iPad

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Horace Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Malvern Show − the successor to Peterborough, etc. etc.
Date: Tue, 21 May 2013 21:55

The list of exhibitors looks good ; see http://www.malvern-ios.org/exhibitors.html
If that link works − I must be getting somewhere with the Mac !

I am hoping to get there − I went to the hospital yesterday , and they used a smart bit of technology to do a scan, and showed me the results on the screen 3 minutes later − a cross section through the retina, before and after the last op . They were obviously pretty pleased with the result , and so was I.

I am sure that all this stuff is very boring, so I won't go on . But I am hoping for normal like to resume by mid-summer.

Maybe see a few folk at Malvern ?

Geoff

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