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2012 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-29
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

8—14 November

From: Geoff
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2012 08:00

Plants in flower in my collection in October
https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid66cc6b7e29550ebd&pagebrowse
&resid66CC6B7E29550EBD!638&type5&authkey!AIgzsAyW5HEvjl8&Bsrc
Photomail&BpubSDX.Photos

The white Vanda – actually an Ascda. – Siberian White. A
good size - 9cm+ and it looks likely to be 9 or 10 flowers when all out.
A good result on a plant with flowers this large – the bigger
ones ( vandas) average 7, and double figures is excellent, although the
smaller Ascdas can get up to twice those numbers.

Blla- as it was, now I think it is something else – but good
'ol Peggy Ruth Carpenter. Always a favourite. Starting to grow
nicely in my Aquaculture system.

Then the pink Dendrobium – this is D.Berry
'Oda'. A plant I bought in flower and bud in September.
A nice one, with a lot of Kingianum in it, so a dry rest at some point
is called for.

Then 4 pics of my Howeara Lava Burst, for which I got a 2nd at
Writhlington ( in the Oncidiniae hybrid class). Also doing quite well-
not as many flowers per spike as the magnificent single spike I had, and
probably showed, last year, but it gave two leads, both of which double
spike, so I must not grumble.

Then an interesting little thing ,an Ionocidium hybrid – I do
know the name, but it escapes me as I type this. Flowers only 15mm
high,and the plant looks like a miniature oncidium in most respects.
Ionocidium is Oncidium x Ionium.

Then a few pics of Lanium avicolor . I can't think why I bought
this – not for the flower magnificence ! – those rather
boringly dull little things are only a cm or even less, across.

The (IMHO) fantastic cattleya is one I snapped at Writhlington, on
Chantelles stand – and I bought one of the other plants of the
same name – it's a meristem – which was in bud,
but alas the buds failed, as often happens with new import. The main
thing of course is to get the plant growing, and then produce them
myself. I do have the name if anyone wants it.

A series of masdevallias follows. The first, single pic, is M.dynastes.
then several of the hooded little lovely – pink and stripes
– that is M.striatella. The yellow and white lovely with quite
big flowers is M.constricta – easily remembered because of the
constriction in the tubular part of the flower when seen in profile.
The white one is M.infracta (near) alba , and then the real biggie pink
is M.Sans Famille – one bred by a member of my Society who
forgot the parents – hence the orphan Annie name – I got
third in the Mazzie hybrid class at Writhlington for this – it
has flowers some 6 inches high on 15 inch stems. Finally there is M.
fractiflexa with quite large flowers, although not bright or exciting in
colour.

The next pic – not of flowers, show some cattleya seedlings
growing on a twig or rabch – I think I have not shown these
before; I am quite excited by this natural method of growing . I thought
this pic might spark some discussion ?

Now the paphs etc. First Clair de Lune – the old FCC variety
Edgard ( not Edgar ) van Belle. Then a couple of shots of Transvaal , an
AM variety – 'Ajas'. The Phrag is Don Wimber.
Is he ( Don Wimber) the guy who did all the chromosome doubling work at
EYOF ? Or am I confusing him with Dick Clements ? Does anyone know/
remember ?

Next are three shots of a Rodriguezia – R.lanceolata. I have
been buying all the species of Rodriguezias that I can find for a few
years now. This one is perhaps the smallest flowered, but a nice colour.
It is, as you will see, Howeara Lava Burst in miniature, and is one of
its parents.

Last but not least is one of my Schomburgkias )(now , so boringly,
called a Laelia) – thompsonia – which has bbeen in
flower for almost 5 months, extending the flower stem as it went along.
These are the last flowers this year.

Geoff

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Thunias
Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2012 08:35

Same here,

Thunia Veitchiana and Thunia marshalliana did not flower this year, but Thunia Gattonensis did.

Francis

Alex wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Thunias

Well how odd that yours have not flowered either, orchids can be so
puzzling, I suppose it is just wait and see now, anyway thanks for the
info Geoff.
Regards, Alex

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Dennis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2012 20:35

Hi Geoff,
A fantastic group of flowers. BOS were worried that they had lost your Masd. dynastes but I guess you got it back, that's good.
Regarding the stunning blue BLC, is it Chia Lin?
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Thunias
Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2012 23:20

Thanks Francis, it is very peculiar, I only have Gattonensis but was
looking forward to a good display. I suppose it is wait for next year now.
Sigh!
Regards, Alex

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Fri, 09 Nov 2012 10:30

Lc Chiou-Jye Chen 'Da Jiaou'
Thats the name . A well-known Chinese gent I expect...

Yes, M.dynastes was in one of the boxes when I unpacked..

Geoff

John Dennis wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October

Hi Geoff,
A fantastic group of flowers. BOS were worried that they had lost your Masd. dynastes but I guess you got it back, that's good.
Regarding the stunning blue BLC, is it Chia Lin?
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Fri, 09 Nov 2012 16:55

Great flowers, Geoff!

Seeing the Masd striatella brought such lovely memories for me!

I used to have one of them, and I even managed to get some flowers before its demise. I used the flowers as the inspiration for one of my first silver pieces I made.

Hope you guys like it!

Francis

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2012 03:05

Nice one Francis ; I didn t know you were into this .
In my working days I had the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter on my doorstep, and several of the people/firms were clients.
It was not unusual for amateurs to do silversmithery as a hobby, and one of the Colleges ran courses . I was attracted but then I am attracted to so many ideas, and there are never enough hours on the clock.

Geoff

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From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CAM orchids (and communication with other orchid forums)
Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2012 16:20

Hi Alex,
I used to go to a cactus and succulent Society as well as CANWOS and, amazingly, even those who could distinguish seemingly (to me) identical species of Crassula seemed unaware of the peculiar metabolism to which they give their name! CAM, as a process was virtually unknown and in spite of extensive identification knowledge there was very little interest in how they lived except for a sort of mental rule-book for growing them. I suspect it is all to do with the collector's instinct as opposed to the scientist's or even semi-scientist's interest. Members could easily identify plants even from others' slides taken in South America or wherever while I had difficulty seeing where the plants were in the picture!

I don't adversely criticise folks for this approach and often admire it but it is a fact of life. The other factor is to do with the practicality of growing plants in their un-natural conditions. There is a skill in recognising too much or too little water, too high or too low a temperature too much or too little shade but there is no obvious reason why a grower needs to understand the subtleties of life in the wild.

To remark on your observation on S.American orchid; you are probably right. On the other hand, if you happen to be growing one then the chances are that you will err on the (safer?) damp side rather than on the dry and if the the plant thrives you might reasonably assume that you aren't doing anything 'wrong'. I suspect that is the gut feeling we all share.

I suppose that another point is that collectors tend to read identification manuals rather than physiology texts. To some extent this must be an economic phenomenon; everyone wants to know "what it is" whereas few are bothered about "why it is" and so authors will tend to satisfy that identification demand without the boring (?) aspects that might put a buyer off. I must admit that it is only since my retirement that I find time to exercise my curiosity into aspects of nature I wish I'd known about in my younger teaching days!

Lastly; even within the O-Talk forum, there hasn't exactly been a rush to discuss the point! Yourself, Geoff and maybe a couple of others perhaps?

I drive a Toyota Prius hybrid car. Most of us know about them but I wonder how many (even Prius owners) know the difference between their petrol engines and those of a normal otto cycle engine? Exactly the same phenomenon I suspect.
Cheers
John

On 5 Nov 2012, at 22:02, plik@clara.co.uk wrote:

> John − I wonder why this subject is unpopular? Looking at the link you
> gave, the bits that i could understand that is, suggests that many S
> american orchids may not need as much water as one might think.
> Valuable knowledge I would have thought.
> Regards, Alex
>

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: way off message ! But we are not exactly rushing Tricia off her feet, are we Tricia ? ?
Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2012 20:05

Since you (John) clearly know the difference between the Otto cycle and the Lanchester cycle, have you got to the bottom of the different torque values in higher revs ?(of the latter).
The younger drivers say that Lanchester cycle engined cars (Lexus, Prius − maybe more) feel "gutless" when they put their foot down to overtake. My demo' run, not long enough to form solid opinions, nevertheless left me feeling that the car (a 2 litre "Sport" Lexus ) was rather too bland for my taste, from which I make the purely intuitive leap to maligning their torque values.

Geoff

Sent from my iPad

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CAM orchids (and communication with other orchid forums)
Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2012 23:30

Hello John − yes I remember you talking about stapelias, probably CAM type
metabolism remembering the conditions where they grew in the Transvaal.
We are getting rather off message now but I also don't have a clue about
the difference between a Lanchester and Otto cycle car. You have got
geoff torquing about it though :-)
Regards, Alex

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From: Tina Stagg
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2012 18:05

Yes, I do like it, Francis! I used to do hobby silversmithing, as did my husband. There was an annual residential course at the Snowdonia park study centre but, sadly, the tutor eventually moved away. I registered my hall mark at the Sheffield assay office, as it was known to have the fastest turnaround. I only made bits and bobs: intricately pierced bookmarks and some repousse plaques and Christmas tree stars as I liked to work at the dining room table. Richard was more into hammering and soldering in the boiler room.

My uncle was a gem setter in the jewellery quarter in Birmingham, Geoff, and Richard s grandfather had a factory nearby, plating things. (He also made brass cannibal spoons for export to Africa)

I still haven t any orchids in flower but the laelia anceps house is full of spikes.

Tina

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From:
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2012 23:20

Have just seen the silver orchid. My Blacberry shows the pic but my iMac deleted it saying it was from an unknown source. Its very nice Francis. Very clever.
Regards Alex
Sent from my BlackBerry smartphone from Virgin Media

"Tina Stagg" wote Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October

Yes, I do like it, Francis! I used to do hobby silversmithing, as did my husband. There was an annual residential course at the Snowdonia park study centre but, sadly, the tutor eventually moved away. I registered my hall mark at the Sheffield assay office, as it was known to have the fastest turnaround. I only made bits and bobs: intricately pierced bookmarks and some repousse plaques and Christmas tree stars as I liked to work at the dining room table. Richard was more into hammering and soldering in the boiler room.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CAM orchids (and communication with other orchid forums)plus off topic)
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2012 00:55

Hi Alex,
I have a neighbour who in his retirement is writing the history of RR and Bentley engines. He recalls that Lanchester (not a part of that history) went through a few engineering contortions to get around the Otto cycle patents.
Just to keep you posted re-the orchid/CAM aspects; I've just sent Geoff an email about speculations of orchidaceous CAM and, when he gets back from his holiday maybe we can offer something better than my extensive verbiage for OT.
As for stapelias; yes, I'm still interested in them as well − but its the old story; the more you are interested in the less you know about each!
But I've just noticed that pineapples are CAM too! That raises the interesting point I gleaned from somewhere that plants eaten in the morning can have different acidy from when eaten in the afternoon. This is, apparently common in edible CAM plants. "What a Wonderful World" as Satchmo sang! Are any orchids edible as plants rather than as vanillin? I wonder how and when that is extracted? (Hm, RR to Vanillin in one email!)
Cheers
John

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2012 09:10

Alex, there are some weird and not-so-wonderful things going on with
recent emails :-) For instance, Blackberry messages show as
attachments here on the list server, but as normal on the iMac's
mail. Francis's silver orchid pic also displayed perfectly on the
iMac but it is embedded so maybe your iMac's mail filter is set up to
discard embedded pics?

What confused the issue for me was that while Francis's pic was
embedded Geoff's 39 thumbnail pics weren't, and were included as
attachments in all the replies apart from one with which I tinkered
and John Dennis's reply from his iPad.

Tricia

"You can lead a horticulture, but you can't make her think."-- Dorothy Parker

Alex wrote:

Have just seen the silver orchid. My Blacberry shows the pic but my
iMac deleted it saying it was from an unknown source. Its very nice
Francis. Very clever. Regards Alex
Sent from my BlackBerry smartphone from Virgin Media

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: JOHN DENNIS
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Dracula chesteronii
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2012 14:20

Hi All,
Have done a little study of my Dracula chesteronii. Hope you like it. When I sent a shot to my friend Allan Burdis he said it was a plant that only an "Orchid Nut" or a "Mother" would appreciate.
John D

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2012 21:15

Yes it could be Tricia. I subscribe to a filter service on my clara
address called 'Border Scout'. It blocks spam and stuff very well but is
perhaps overzealous. Must check.
Regards, Alex

Tricia wrote:

> maybe your filter is set up to discard embedded pics?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 08:35

Wow Tina,

That is a lot of connections to jewellery in the family!

I have been wanting to do some proper gemstone setting for a while, but there doesn't seem to be that many (good) courses around. I'll have to investigate a little longer before taking the plunge on that one.

Francis

Tina Stagg wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October

Yes, I do like it, Francis! I used to do hobby silversmithing, as did my husband. There was an annual residential course at the Snowdonia park study centre but, sadly, the tutor eventually moved away. I registered my hall mark at the Sheffield assay office, as it was known to have the fastest turnaround. I only made bits and bobs: intricately pierced bookmarks and some repousse plaques and Christmas tree stars as I liked to work at the dining room table. Richard was more into hammering and soldering in the boiler room.

My uncle was a gem setter in the jewellery quarter in Birmingham, Geoff, and Richard s grandfather had a factory nearby, plating things. (He also made brass cannibal spoons for export to Africa)

I still haven t any orchids in flower but the laelia anceps house is full of spikes.

Tina

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re; boring, tedious, generally off-putting stuff on CAM plants sent as an attchmt
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 11:25

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff Hands
Date: 13 November 2012 11:22:32 GMT
To: John Stanley
Subject: Re: Re; boring, tedious, generally off-putting stuff on CAM plants sent as an attchmt

I am surprised that my long message got sent − i had to re-figure my
mail client to suit the ship's wi-fi, and had some problems. I
intended to seek help this morning ( I think its Tuesday − time gets
a bit unreal after a few days at sea !

However, re − reading my message, I need to make two corrections.

1. " no Vandaea in South America". My meaning is that Vandaea only
exist in the continent where they evolved and separated from the main
proto-stem of orchids, i.e.Asia, with tye small exception of the
sub-tribes in Africa. 2. On re-considering my argument, I would
expect to find CAM in any other orchids which continued their
evolution in South America at the same time frame as the Cattleyas
and Oncidiums − which means at least other Maxillariniae genera at
least.

When home, I will try to do a bit more searching, see if I can find
someone publishing on CAM currently, and attempt a conversation. (
not here, at $90 for 240 minutes usage of the wi-fi, with a glacially
slow connection speed ! ) . But then, at home, life will take over my
day, as compared to this very relaxing intermission, coccooned by
Cunard...

Now its breakfast time − 9 am − at least, my missus has been up for
30 minutes now... I've been up for a whole 90 minutes ! ( at home i
rise at 5.30, otherwise there is not enough time to more than 75%of
the things I have on my priority list each day )

Cheers,

Geoff

Sent from my iPad

On 12 Nov 2012, at 23:17, John Stanley wrote:

Gee Geoff,
I thought you were on holiday!

Be fair; give me an hour or two with my laptop on my knee on a comfy
settee (I think that's a poem coming on!)

Ill get back to you because there's some interesting points in there
we need to talk through.

Your wife must be either asleep or very understanding!

Cheers for now

John

On 12 Nov 2012, at 17:00, Geoff Hands wrote:

As to book prices,I just bought a copy of Steve Mannings book, for my
wife to give me as a Xmas present − I forget the exact price, but
approx 50. An antiquarian bookseller (!) in USA offers it for $
350.... Try Orchid Digest for Fowlies book ; they found a box of
unsold copies on a shelf in a cupboard, and my copy came from there,
at a much lower price.

I don't think Fowlie means evolution on a thousands of years scale
when he talks of successive glaciations ? My recollection is that the
last one at the North pole ended a few thousand years ago (10 ? − but
then it depends on what you mean by ended ! ) I think I have read
that an ice-free north pole has been the norm rather than the
exception, in ancient times , but the existence or otherwise depends
very much on the location of the tectonic plates, especially the bits
above water level. I don't know whether South polar ice ages have
been at different times . I believe that they could have been, in
view of current thinking among Glaciologists (meaning scientists
studying ice ages etc) and of course that is the critical thing
affecting climate in Cattleya land, aka South America.

The distribution of orchids, also surely depends on tectonic plate
movement.

Using Rob Dressler's phylogenesis of circa 2005 − just before the
orchid world began to be shaken by the first published DNA results
(although nothing I have read changes his grand plan, very much) all
the monopodials, for example, are in tribe Vandaea ; split into three
sub-tribes, one of which is wholly Asian ( but fringing off into the
adjacent parts of Australia and Oceania − meaning the Pacific
Islands, much of which constitutes bits of the Asian plate). That
first one, btw, is the Aeridiniae, which includes Vandas and
Phalaenopsis. Only in Asia etc.

The second sub-tribe is the Aeranginiae , including Aerangis.These
are found exclusively in Africa, and Madagascar, although there are
supposed to be some in the adjacent part of India.

The third sub-tribe is the Angraecinea -Angraecums and their allies,
found exclusively in Africa and Madagascar.

I have to add that some writers say "no Vandaea in the Americas" but
never give details. I think it is misconception. I once collected
plants at the foot of Mount Arenal in Costa Rica, thinking them to be
an Oerstedella species I was seeking,and when they, or maybe it
flowered, it seemed to be monopodial and hence Vandaceous , but was
eventually identified by Dressler, as it happens, as "one of the
horse Maxillarias" − maybe it was these which gave rise to fallacious
thought.

Why the limitations as to spread of a sub-tribe beyond a tectonic
plate ? They evolved there, and did so after the continents separated
from the single Panglossia ( or whatever name you want to apply to
the single continent which once existed on earth).

Other plants which evolved at even more ancient times, are found in
all continents, because they evolved before there was a substantial
gap too far for seeds to be carried between one continent and another.

Now, getting back to CAM, it is known in Oncidiums and Laelias. Both
S.American genera exclusively , and incidentally both members of
Dresslers Tribe Maxillariniae − which is also confined to the
Americas, mostly South and Central.

You will be aware that the land bridge between the two Americas is
only recent − is it 7 or 11 million years(?) but long enough perhaps
for some orchids to spread across. The true Laelias, inc Cattleya are
all South American, ( Encyclia is in both continents).

Lacking data, and based on Fowlies comments about climate changes in
South America, I am now able to merely speculate that CAM was
"forced" on the two known genera by those changes, and won't be found
elsewhere. Also that since it is now an optional extra tacked onto
the specification of the basic orchid, and C2 or C3 is also available
to those plants, it will only be used when climatic conditions are
appropriate.

It would be interesting to calculate the energy utilisation in
producing x mols of a plant sugar by the C2 and daylight
(chlorophyll) route as compared to the same by the carboxyl C4 or CAM
route .

Anyone with even less knowledge than me might think that using C4
avoids the complex process of producing chlorophyll itself (have you
ever looked- at the precursers for that ! Involving another complex
molecule almost like haemoglobin ) but I have gone a little further
along the road and realised that chlorophyll is also needed for
producing atp , which is the fuel of most chemical reactions in
humans as well as orchids.So it is still necessary.

I have built a big house of cards, John − can you huff and puff it
down ?

Geoff

Sent from my iPad

On 12 Nov 2012, at 00:39, John Stanley wrote:

Hi Geoff,

I admire your dedication in getting an email off to me, possibly as
you climb one handed up the steps to your cruise ship with your iPad
in the other! I've just had a quick look on the web and discover a
second hand copy of the book. . . . at a mere 109 !

However, from what you say, the author seems (seemed) to be on the
right wavelength. However, he was clearly / apparently talking about
evolution on a scale of thousands of years whereas I am thinking in
terms of several tens of millions. Or should I say that I am
speculating in terms of tens of millions. Even so, the principles
seem to apply whatever the time scale (within reason) and is
basically species isolation leading to a dichotomy of subsequent
speciations.

I guess that this could certainly happen on 'my' contemplated scale
except that we'd be discussing generic or family dichotomies rather
than species taxa. Speculation without evidence is a wonderful
exercise, but then, quite a number of orchid collectors might suggest
that to be what taxonomy is all about!

Incidentally, what we now refer to as CAM was first suggested/implied
in about 1804 (!) the essence of the cycle was worked out in 1892 but
the acronym, CAM, first appeared in 1940. I expect you're amazed at
how knowledgeable I am (but I read it in Wikipedia about 45 seconds
ago and I've already forgotten the names of relevant authors)

I wonder how well or poorly orchid seeds survive as fossils not very
I hear you mumble). I must have a rummage through the web. I'll bet
not many have even looked.

Better go now; I think they're piping you aboard Geoff!

If you have pineapple on your menu, bear in mind that it is a CAM
plant . . . . . . ! I'm beginning to wonder if CAM physiology is more
normal than the non-CAM condition.

Cheers
John

On 11 Nov 2012, at 11:24, "Geoff" wrote:

> The Brazilian Bifoliate Cattleyas and their Colour Varieties

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Thunias
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 22:40

John Dennis − just a thought, have you got thunias growing now? and if you
have how have they performed this year?
Regards, Alex

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoff Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 08:20

Brum was of course, in case you never suspected, at the cutting edge of invention and technology in the 19th century. Silver technology was a matter of much interest, e.g. At the birth of photography − based on the peculiarity of silver salts in changing when expsed to light.
The founding partner of my firm of Patent Attorneys, one George Shaw was an early experimenter in photography, also Professor of Chemistry at Queens College, which became Birmingham University
Sent from my iPad and incidentally was self educated ! A rematkable man − dead long before I was born of course. But he was said to have had a hand in guiding Elkingtons towards successful silver plating, so Brum could challenge Sheffield Plate.
And before that ,as i expect you know William Boulton pruduced some silver ware which I recently heard described, in a BBC programme about antiques, as arguably the best ever.Birnibgham Museum used to have a very good collection of it on display. This is the same Boulton who went into partnership with James Watt, to manufacture steam engines, and this was the first ever mass production of articles in the sense which a modern engineer would understand- making stuff so that parts were interchangeable. And to do that they had to invent a whole raft of other things that the modern engineer would recognise too, starting with the micrometer....
I am sure I go on too long . Comes of having hours to kill on a cruise ship, which encourages my natural verbosity.

Bye bye

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Dennis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 09:20

Always great to hear from you Geoff. You seem to be dashing, well relaxing, all over the world, but you always keep in touch. That's tremendous.
Regards,
John

Sent from my iPad

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 13:50

Geoff,

For me, being naturally curious and always wanting to learn more, I find all your explanations of things fascianting, so many thanks!

Francis

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From: Tina Stagg
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plants in flower in my collection in October
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 15:10

Yes, we Brummies are very proud of our heritage − I was born in Handsworth. Boulton s silver is beautiful, very elegant and refined but with guts . I have seen (and handled) pieces at study weekends.

Where are you going on this cruise? Will you see any orchids?

Tina

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