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2010 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

July 1—7

From: Tony Watkinson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalaenopsis − How not to kill them?
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 04:00

My Phalaenopsis are grown in a kind of conservatory I guess. It is a
hothouse attached to the back of the house in Perth, Western Australia.
That's facing north of course, as we are in the southern hemisphere. I keep
it at a min 15C during the winter (which is now.) and it can go up to 40C+
in the summer. I have a fogging system that is attached to a humidistat,
which comes on when the humidity goes below 50%. That's in summer of course.
It is turned off for the winter. I use rain water in that as the local
scheme water is full of calcium and leaves white stains all over the plants.

Two pictures attached are Cycnodes Wine Delight. A hybrid registered by
Fuchs Jr. in 1/1/1980. Its parents are Cycnoches lehmanii and Mormodes
sinuata. This is a real stunner and is in flower right now. It is growing in
straight Pertlite in a clear plastic pot with holes in the side, but not the
bottom. This means that it has about 3/4 inch of water (rain of course) in
the bottom all the time. I add Alginox (Physan) to the water to stop rot. I
found that these Catasetum/Mormodes/Cycnoches type orchids grow big fat
p/bulbs when they are standing in water (and fertiliser) during their growth
cycle.

Regards

Tony

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 07:20

Roger,

If you look again at the flower pictures you will see very clearly that they are not Orchis mascula. The flowers are not consistent with them, and definitely look very much like a Dactylorhiza.

I still think they are Common Spotted.

Francis

Roger Grier wrote re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.

> Hi David, Because you were calling your spotted leaves a 'Dact' I
> just took it for granted that it was a Dact, and so did Francis,
> but something was nagging me. So, when I looked at your recent
> photos I saw the answer. I am almost certain that your plants
> are........Early Purple orchids. Or to give it its botanical name,
> Orchid mascula. If you do plant them into your garden, they will
> come to no harm. I have a nice clump in my garden.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 08:10

Mornin' David,

I was most surprised to hear that the pot was semi submerged in a pond, but then I know of a Common Spotted orchid that grows on a central island of a pond and that is very wet.

But, I feel that you would be correct to plant it in your garden.

I once dug down [ on private land.....and did get permission ].....just to see the tubers of the Early Purple, and I was surprised how deep they were. But then if my memory serves me well, Bluebells are bulbs are quite deep.

It will be interesting to hear how deep the Early Purple tubers were when and if you do split the pots contents.

Best of luck with them.

Off to photograph some Bee Orchids and others.........with Cowes in the background !!!!!

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 08:55

Good morning Francis,

I think that we have got our wires crossed somewhere. The flowers are of Epipactis veratrifolia and that does not have any markings on the leaves. There are many such leaves in the pot.

The spotted leaves are from Orchis mascula, and they are just young plants not I guess flowering size yet.

I think that having two types of orchids in one pot caused a few crossed wires in the local exchanges.

Cheers, Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 09:30

The Deputy Prime Minister has set up a site where anyone can − and should -
tell him about laws and also regulations which we think should be repealed.
He says he will listen.

I have done a piece about the stupid CITES rules we have ; no I'm not trying
to get CITES repealed − that is too much to expect. Just more sensible and
affordable rules which will enable our traders to compete with their German
etc opposite numbers on a level playing field.

Submissions such as mine, are probably ranked on the number of "hits" where
viewers say " Yes I agree" or whatever. Please take the time to visit my
submission − I hope this is a link below, if not try copying it into your
browser. And vote for it !

Please pass it on to everyone you know who might vote too.

I have already sent it ti Sara, since I know Brian ( Burnham Nurseries) has
been banging his head against this particular brick wall for many years.

Then cross your fingers and hope. Is that a light at the end of the tunnel
- or an approaching train ?

Here's the link to read my submission and vote on it.

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/cutting-business-and-third-sector-regulations/simplify-gold-plated-rules-for-plant-import-export/idea-view

Geoff

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalaenopsis − How not to kill them?
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 09:40

Thanks for the interesting info.

Re Cycnoches etc − yes I too grow them in plain Perlite, standing in 2 cm of
nutrient/water mix, and they are growing big bulbs ( one − Cycnoches
loddigesii) − has doubled last years bulb size so far , and here in UK we
are only half-way through the growing season. My Wine Delight suffered the
main bulb being snapped clean off, half way up, and I dusted the end with
sulphur and carried on with both. The original plant with the lower half of
the bulb looks as though it could match last years bulb is size despite my
clumsiness ; the other half has not grown ( I know that some of this group
have eyes at intervals all the way up the bulb − that where some of the
flower spikes come from. But it hasn't rotted yet , so I;m still hoping for
a second plant from it.0

Cheers

Geoff

Tony Watkinson wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalaenopsis − How not to kill them?

> My Phalaenopsis are grown in a kind of conservatory I guess... [Snip]

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalaenopsis − How not to kill them?
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 15:50

I don't think mine have died from crown rot, I get some nights
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: David's spotted orchids.
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 16:55

Hello David,

Just got back from a Wild Orchid Safari in the deepest New Forest and one other area.

Having seen yet more hybrid Dacts, it tells me to E-mail you and ask, where did the chap get the pot full of orchids???

I'll tell you why I ask this question. Having today seen more strange leaf markings, and having another damned good look at your spotted leaves, makes me ask you this question. Can you please look at the underside of the leaves [ the spotted ones ] and tell me if there are any markings on the underside of the leaves. Normally there will be just a few, and they would not be so prominent as the markings on the topside of the leaves. If there are any markings then for sure that plant would be an Early Purple orchid.

It is possible, that one of your photos shows a Common Spotted orchid, but we will have to wait I think until next year.

If you do have the answer as to where the pot of orchids came from, that may shed even more light on to the subject.

November 21st......you will see how difficult it can get. &^^%*^%*&()()_(^%"$£&)_)_*

Cheers, Rodge.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: A type of Dact.
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 17:30

Hi all,

Can anyone put a name to this orchid please.

Rodge.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Bee orchids
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 17:50

Hi all,

You can clearly see from the two images why the Bee orchids are always self pollinated.

1. The face, beady eyes and spiky arms would put most insect visitors off.
2. The pollinia flop forward from there initial place to just hang in free air waiting for the wind to blow them onto the stigmatic surface.

Maybe in the next couple of days, I will remove the pollinia with a specially adapted wooden rod to show how the pollinia react when removed........the relative position that they take up.

Cheers, Rodge.

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: PonerorchisGraminifolia
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 21:00

Here is a pic of my Thompson & Morgan 'butterfly' orchids (ponerorchis
graminifolia) − absolutely tiny and a magnifying glass job. The biggest
is under 2 inches tall, there is a sixpence oops! a 5p piece lying there
for scale.
Interestingly Paul Cumbleton has an article on the very attractive
cultivars they grow in Japan, I will send a link.
Regards, Alex

PonerorchisGr.JPG

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Ponerorchis
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 21:05

Here is the link to the article by Paul Cumbleton, the Wisley pleione man,
on japanese ponerorchis. benice to be able to get some.

http://www.srgc.org.uk/wisley/2008/010808/log.html

Regards, Alex

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spotted orchids.
Date: Thu, 01 Jul 2010 22:20

Hello Rodge,
The leaves have no markings underneath, the markings on the top don't show through. They probably came from Germany. He had a much bigger pot full in his pond. By the state of the pots he must have had them for a long time.
David

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 07:35

Roger,

Your pics are great, and I have to admit, I do love Bee orchids. Managed to find a few the other weekend on a guided tour of Downe Bank (where Darwin used to live and research a lot on orchid pollination).

One observation though, is that the Bee orchid is (possibly) self-pollinated because the original bees that used to pollinate died out in the UK. In the continent, all Bee orchids are still pollinated by bees and bumblebees. I am no expert myself, but the evidence of pollination in the continent does make a strong case for the hypothesis that their natural pollinator in the UK died out and the plants had to adapt somehow to ensure their survival.

Francis

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 07:40

Roger,

David did send pictures of both the Epipactis and the other flowers, pinkish-purple, tri-lobed lip, with defined markings on them. They very much look like Dac. fuchsii to me!

Look at all the pics on his original first post and you will see one picture of the flowers of the Common Spotted there!

Regards,

Francis

Roger Grier wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.

> Good morning Francis, I think that we have got our wires crossed
> somewhere. The flowers are of Epipactis veratrifolia and that does
> not have any markings on the leaves. There are many such leaves in
> the pot. The spotted leaves are from Orchis mascula, and they are
> just young plants not I guess flowering size yet. I think that
> having two types of orchids in one pot caused a few crossed wires
> in the local exchanges.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 09:05

I find this thread quite amazing. All we have read and learnt about how
clever orchids are, with complex systems to ensure pollination, and needing
just one particular insect ( or whatever , and of course this is a
generalisation, too) and now I hear that when there are no pollinators, they
can DIY , and manage without.

It's a good job we blokes are mammals and not orchids, lest our women-folk
got so smart

Geoff

francis quesada pallares wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids

> Roger,

> Your pics are great, and I have to admit, I do love Bee orchids.
> Managed to find a few the other weekend on a guided tour of Downe
> Bank (where Darwin used to live and research a lot on orchid
> pollination).

> One observation though, is that the Bee orchid is (possibly)
> self-pollinated because the original bees that used to pollinate
> died out in the UK. In the continent, all Bee orchids are still
> pollinated by bees and bumblebees. I am no expert myself, but the
> evidence of pollination in the continent does make a strong case
> for the hypothesis that their natural pollinator in the UK died out
> and the plants had to adapt somehow to ensure their survival.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tony Watkinson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 09:30


To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 09:40

Hello Francis,

I must 'Bee' hydrating with all of this dry weather and heat!!!!! To be honest Francis I somehow deleted David's first E-mail, any chance of you passing it on.

If the flower was trilobed, then as you say it sure looks like D. Fuchsii. I saw some leaves yesterday of a plant that had other Fuchsii around it, but the markings left me very puzzled again. Although there are reports of Early Purple orchids in the area, I have never seen them in that location. Will wait till next year.

What did you think of the lovely Dact with the elongated lip????

Rodge.

francis quesada pallares wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] David's spots.

> Roger,

> David did send pictures of both the Epipactis and the other
> flowers, pinkish-purple, tri-lobed lip, with defined
> markings on them. They very much look like Dac. fuchsii to
> me!

> Look at all the pics on his original first post and you
> will see one picture of the flowers of the Common Spotted
> there!

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 09:45

Hello again Francis,

I had heard of your story, and agree that on the continent they are, as books tell us, are still pollinated by Bees. But as we do have Bees of several types, why don't they do the job?

It sure is a very interesting hobby this, 'Wild Orchid' one.

What I am waiting to do, hopefully in the next few days is to actually try and remove the pollinia with my 'attachment/device' and see what happens.

I will report all of my findings to you, hopefully with images.

Yesterday I saw very many Common Marsh orchids of such height and strength that I had not seen before...............next year!!!

Rodge.

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 12:10

Roger,

You will know very well that many orchids are pollinator specific and will only be pollinated by one or two types of insects (or birds/bats/beetles or whatever you will). We do have many types of bees in this country, which incidentally seem to be declining anyway. However, this is not to say that the specific type of bee that used to pollinate it here in the UK is still alive! As we all know, there are lots of introduced beast in many countries that decimate, and eventually overcome the native species, and I for one, would not be surprised if this has been the case with the bees that used to pollinate this particular orchid.

Regards,

Francis

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 12:10

Tony,

As I said on my email, I am no expert on the topic, but there are many different types of bees.

Francis

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: MY latest orchid images − hope 12 modest files is not too much at one go !
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 16:20

399. Aerides affine. Typical smaller flowered Aerides ; as seen in shows in
the Far East they are often big plants with multiple spikes, but more than
one spike here in UK is uncommon , to say the least. Light is one
explanation, and perhaps it's the reason we don't manage to grow big plants
capable of multiple spikes, too.

400 The Vasco is similar to the well-known V. Thai Sky − both have vasco in
their breeding, both are an amazing colour ( by the usual orchid standards).
Easy grower, this one, maybe it will get big enough to have more flowers,
maybe..)

401 A rare Aerides it seems. Unusual spike habit too, as I think I mentioned
before. Has been called A. palawi − giving a clue to its origin I guess, but
is now A.odorata ( which it doesn't actually do. i.e. no significant odour !
) alba.

402. C.mossiae v Wagneri. I read ( Chadwicks book about the Classic
Cattleyas) that this is actually a synonym for alba . It seems that the
first examples found were called C.wagneri, thinking them to be a new
species, and after Reichenbach said that it was an alba mossiae, Sander
carried on using the name as a varietal name- and it stuck. Not a wonderful
shape, by the standards of hybrids , but one cannot, and should not, apply
the same standards, I think. To my − no doubt prejudiced-eyes , it's a
beautiful orchid, and a beautiful perfume too − as most of these Catt
species have. Big flowers − some 6 or 7 inch natural spread.

403. Podangis − actually six spikes here on this diminutive plant, growing
in a 3.5 inch pot. I'm delighted to see a new growth at the side − this is
not really a sympodal type of plant , if that's the right word for things
like Oncids which produce a new growth at the side of the old one, every
year, but older plants can , I suppose, end up as a bunch of growths. The
plant seems to like what it is getting , since the flowers seen are on no
less than six spikes.

404 Another cattleya species , this time warneri. Again large flowers.
Again lovely scent . I keep thinking the flowers are going over − its been
out for getting on for 3 weeks now, but each time they seem to recover.

405. C lawrenceana. Much more substance here, although slightly smaller
flowers. A very rich strong colour too.

406 C. mendelli. Started off looking like a semi-alba, but over the course
of a couple of weeks the petal colour darkened. Another big sweetly perfumed
cattleya.

407. This is , I think, what was called the "Imperial Strain" of C.
warscewiczii. The best form and substance , particularly the way the
flowers are held, of any species cattleya that I have yet flowered. The
flowers have a natural spread of 7 inches − would be nearer 9 if pressed for
a herbarium. My wife keeps coming and telling me that she has walked past
the basket of flowers in the hall, and the perfume is one to die for.

408 I have shown this plant before , but since it has produced another 4
spikes all at once, thought it worth a second go . Gongora flaveola.

409. I propagated this Thunia last year and have several more plants near
flowering size ; they grow like mad in straight sphagnum moss I find. It is
the only Thunia species I have , so if anyone has duplicates especially of
T.alba or marshalliana − the white ones − how about a swap ?

410. I won this in a raffle, on a coach, after we had visited our friend in
Antwerp , coming back from Dresden last year. Another 1 or maybe 2 flowers
coming. These are fans of leaves, no bulbs, but sympodal. Also seems to like
being grown in moss, or a moss-rich compost, I find.

411.Tolumnia Shannon Elizabeth "Pink something or other" I had some doubt
about the name − the plant is supposed to be a stem prop from the original
btw ; but grown in different light ( i.e. the winter flowering instead of
the summer one ) there is a pink tinge instead of the cream colour, so I
suppose its true. A good spike for this kind of thing.

412 Stereochilus dalatensis. Another miniature − flowers maybe 15mm across ?
Growing on a mount, but very few roots. I have had it for perhaps a year, so
was quite surprised when it produced two spikes.

Hope you enjoy.

Geoff.

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From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Ponerorchis Graminifolia
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 16:30

Hmm....!

I had one out of 6 corms which produced a stem and flower like yours, one
which did not produce at all and four which flowered quite well. I grew
them in minimum 15 degrees C at night and about 23 degrees in the day. They
are now in a cooler day temperature than my tropical orchids and your email
prompts me to feed them ......... and ...... with mention of the name
'Cumbleton'........ my Pleiones too!

Tony G.

Alex wrote re: [OrchidTalk] Ponerorchis Graminifolia

> Here is a pic of my Thompson & Morgan 'butterfly' orchids
> (ponerorchis graminifolia) − absolutely tiny and a magnifying glass
> job. The biggest is under 2 inches tall, there is a sixpence oops!
> a 5p piece lying there for scale.

> Interestingly Paul Cumbleton has an article on the very attractive
> cultivars they grow in Japan, I will send a link.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 17:00

Gaoff, Great idea and response. Let us hope that all that are in this group respond to support your response.
Regards

--- On Thu, 1/7/10, Geoffrey Hands wrote:

Geoffrey Hands wrote re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !

The Deputy Prime Minister has set up a site where anyone can and should − tell him about laws and also regulations which we think should be repealed. He says he will listen

[Snip]

Here s the link to read my submission and vote on it.

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/cutting-business-and-third-sector-regulations/simplify-gold-plated-rules-for-plant-import-export/idea-view

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Fri, 02 Jul 2010 23:05

Geoff _ I have accessed thid site but cannot see how to get to your page
on rules to import plants. How do you get there?
Regards, Alex

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From: john Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids
Date: Sat, 03 Jul 2010 00:35

Roger,
Apparently, bee orchids (Ophrys apifera) are still at least occasionally pollinated by the solitary bee Eucera sp.(or spp) in Mediterranean and mainland Europe south of Britain and the morphology of the flower and pollinium you describe are, so I read, not inconsistent with insect pollination. However, it seems probable that self pollination has become a contingency strategy in the absence of the former insect pollinators in Britain as you suggest.
I, also, am certainly no expert in the pollination mechanisms of these orchids and I have never seen seen insects actually pollinate them although earlier this June I saw a large bee battling against strong wind on Anglesey, apparently trying to stay in the vicinity of Ophrys flowers. Possibly a coincidental battle with the wind for shelter?
There is information on the web (possibly ultimately from a single source ( ? ) such as at http://bioref.lastdragon.org/Magnoliophytina/Ophrys_apifera.html and the issue is referred to in the field guide Orchids of Britain and Ireland by Anne and Simon Harrap ISBN 0-7136-6956-X Have you tried a search with Apifera, bee, pollination? I turned up about half a dozen references broadly in agreement but not all citing sources.
I wonder if anyone has, or knows of, photographs of these orchids being visited by bees or, even better, the actual pollinium transfer on video.
The other problem (for me) is that I understand that there is significant geographical variation in Ophrys apifera (s.l.) and there may well be several bee spp doing the necessary! I have long imagined that the insect-orchid association where mimicry is involved was pretty specific and, in some cases, is not just a visual one (scent too). Someone out there must be able to offer an authoritative view . . . . . ? I think** they are close to the fly and spider orchids aren't they? Is there a similar observational problem with those too?
John
** I think therefore I am . . . .(uncertain)

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Bee orchid pollination.
Date: Sat, 03 Jul 2010 10:20

Mornin' all,

Thank you all for your input regarding the Bee orchid pollination in the U.K.

Here is the way that I see it. As I have said before, any self respecting insect, on catching sight of the 'image' that the Bee orchid portrays would not go anywhere near it for fear of sure death. Have a look at the image of the Bee orchid. Then have a look at the images of the Early Spider orchid and the Fly orchid.

Image number two shows pollinia on the end of a toothpick [with a slightly sanded down point] which came from a Dactylorhiza orchid, and many similar pollinia would take up this position.

Image number three shows a pollinia, one of the two, from a Bee orchid. You can plainly see that instead of facing forward from the insects head, where it has taken up such a position as to place pollen on the stigmatic surface.....it just flops BACKWARDS. There is no way that the pollinia in this position would put some pollen onto another Bee orchid stigmatic surface. That is if ever an insect was stupid enough to try.

Image number four shows an Early Spider orchid. I have never seen a pollinator on any of the flowers, but have seen pollinia stuck to the flower and stem parts, so presumably they do have a pollinator.

Image number five shows a Fly orchid which imitates a type of early flying wasp, and it sends out a ephemeron.....and it sure works, see Image 6.

Image number seven shows a Burnett moth with several pollinia wrapped around its tongue. The two pollinia are attached to one piece of a 'sticky wrapper' that wraps around its tongue.

'aint Mother Nature wonderful. Meaning that when our orchids first appeared on this planet they came as they were fashioned by Mother Nature, and I think that the Bee orchid never did have a pollinator in the U.K. And why make it so different from the other Ophrys species in the U.K.

Who said life is boring.

I rest my case.

Cheers, Rodge.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Sat, 03 Jul 2010 11:10

Hi Alex.

Links don't always work when I compose e-mails − unless I am working in
html, ( not a preferred option in this group).

But in any case, I did not intend to provide a link to the Rules themselves
,only to my submission to the Govt web-site about getting rid of them. That
link − or at least URL which you can copy and paste, is as follows :-

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/cutting-business-and-third-sector-regulations/simplify-gold-plated-rules-for-plant-import-export/idea-view

If you want to see the rules (CITES) , Fees and Guidance, try the
attachments...

Geoff

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Bee orchid pollinators.
Date: Sat, 03 Jul 2010 13:25

Hello John,

I did as you suggested and Googled a few sites. One of them, the Wildfowl Wetlands Trust had a photograph of a Bee on a Bee orchid. As it said, the person who took the photograph only had a few seconds to get the shot.

The Bee looks as if it is on the flower upside down to what we would expect, and as stated it soon flew away.

So, I will continue to think that our Bee orchid is self pollinated.

One of the other sites that I visited did agree with my thoughts saying that the Bee orchid which is considered to be monocarpic, does and can grow from the same rootstock/tubers for up to eight years then dies.

This agrees with what I have noticed over the years.

Cheers, Rodge.

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Sat, 03 Jul 2010 23:40

Hello Geoff − no I wasnt looking for the rules but only the firstpart of
your link worked, the second line was in a different font for some odd
reason. i will key it in and get there.
Regards, Alex

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 00:30

Well I have made it. It is complicated because I use my wifes Apple
mostly and look up plik messages (which were set up on my ancient PC) on
the web postbox so results get a bit funny.
Lets hope everybody has a say and the rules just might get changed.
Regards, Alex

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators.
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 08:45

I am picking up on the monocarpic point ; I have never heard or read that
about any orchid, which is not to say it is impossible, but as to dieing
after 8 years , I treat that with some doubt. Of course it was a
generalisation, and no doubt most of our garden perennials for example don't
actually live all that long, without any suggestion of that being due to
them having flowered once.

I'm dredging up "knowledge" from my distant past when I was far more "into"
the botany etc of our native flowers in general − I'm thinking back at least
40 years to a lecture I went to , maybe at Birmingham University ( my orchid
society at the time had some links with the Botany Dept. there) .

My memory tells of learning that certain British native orchids did not
"disappear for several years" and then "reappear in the same spot" ,as was
commonly said . It is simply that they need to make a new tuber ( not sure
if it is a tuber or a corm or whatever − its not a true bulb, I'm sure )
each year, and if the tuber is not strong enough to produce a flowering
shoot the next year, it will just produce the rosette of leaves, which is so
inconspicuous and relatively short lived i.e. it is not there all the whole
year , that people will say − "ah no whatever it is this year". I seem to
recall that one investigation had shown the remnants of something like 14
successive tubers, each representing a year of the life of the plant whilst
records had shown flowers in only 2 or 3 of those years.

Much the same as some of my paphs then...

I wonder if many flowers (native orchids − not paphs − my paphs do have the
benefit of regular watering ! ) will be seen next year, after such a dry
summer − here in the south at least ?

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 10:05

Hi Alex,

The URL, or 'link' if you prefer, is supposed to be all one line but
long links are often split over more than one line in emails − which
is why Geoff suggested it may not work unless pasted into your
browser. The change of font is most likely something to do with how
the software interpreted the 'broken' link. It probably inserts a
carriage return or line feed where there shouldn't be one. Webmail is
notorious for this.

--

Tricia

Anarchists of the world disunite!

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators.
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 13:35

I have been storing away knowledge and facts for the last 70 years, the only problem is, I now have trouble accessing it !!
David

Geoffrey Hands wrote RE: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators.

I am picking up on the monocarpic point ; I have never heard or read that about any orchid, which is not to say it is impossible, but as to dieing after 8 years , I treat that with some doubt. Of course it was a generalisation, and no doubt most of our garden perennials for example don't actually live all that long, without any suggestion of that being due to them having flowered once.

I'm dredging up "knowledge" from my distant past when I was far more "into" the botany etc of our native flowers in general − I'm thinking back at least 40 years to a lecture I went to , maybe at Birmingham University ( my orchid society at the time had some links with the Botany Dept. there)...

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Moss
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 17:00

I am one of these people too lazy or scared to pick my own moss getting covered in mozzy bites and upsetting my wife trying to sterilise it in the kitchen microwave.
I have just rehydrated a 1 Kg pack bought from Plants Plus. It is the finest sphagum moss I have seen in years. This is the time I divide and repot my Lycastineae ( contrary to most books) as the new growth is now producing strong new roots.
I have had a good time repotting and have just ordered 3 more 1Kg packs.
Regards from a murky Devon

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Long links − a solution
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 17:40

You know how you are aware of something but when a situation arises
where it would be useful and you don't think of it until later? Well
this happened just now.

There is a very useful service at http://tinyurl.com which shortens
long links. I just pasted:

http://yourfreedom.hmg.gov.uk/cutting-business-and-third-sector-regulations/simplify-gold-plated-rules-for-plant-import-export/idea-view

which is 136 characters into the appropriate box on their site and
the resulting link is 26 characters:

http://tinyurl.com/28gg6qz

or preview for the security conscious:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/28gg6qz

which displays the original link and offers the option to proceed to
the site.

Very useful!

--

Tricia

Time flies like the wind... Fruit flies like bananas.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Moss
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 19:20

I think I said I had found a source of fresh UK sphagnum and ordered some.

It is lovely stuff , very clean , very few foreign bodies ( just the odd
twig or two).

I had the 80 litre sack , carriage paid to my door for £16.

I mixed it with 3 x 70 litre sacks of Melville orchid bark , using a shovel
and a garden fork, doing this on the garage floor, then filled 4 standard
black dustbins ( approx 75 litres each) . I reckon this mix is just about
perfect for my paphs and catts too , although I guess I will use it
generally. It was perhaps a week ago when I mixed it , and now the mix has
dried out abit and the moss lost its green-ness, but awhen used and watered,
it will go back to being green I think. A pic showing the mix appears above.

Here is a link to the supplier.

http://www.dowsgardensupplies.com/4.html

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Moss
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 19:40

Of course you are right Dennis − I get so tired of "what the books say".

In my club, one of the great and good stands up each month to tell beginners
what to do this month.

in March they say people should start assembling stuff, composts etc, ready
to do all their repotting when the Spring arrives. "Don't repot in the
winter, they say, or in the summer..

I have taken them on one side and challenged this, but they think it is what
they ought to say, even though they don't believe it or follow that advice
themselves.I can't make up my mind whether this is mad or just patronising.

Me, I repot when the plants are ready or need it. New roots appearing ?
Fine − just perfect in fact. I repot at least half a dozen cattleyas every
time I do an inspection and watering , i.e. weekly or slightly more
frequently if I can manage it . I did about twenty over the Christmas /New
Year period − although my use of supplementary lighting meaning the plants
were full of growth at that time is the explanation there ; and I did half a
dozen yesterday , too. The one exception is indeed paphs , since they are
uniquely (?) capable of producing new roots at any point in their growth
cycle, and it is unusual to actually see the new roots emerging anyway. So
those I repot at least every 18 months, doing this preferably in February or
August.

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: john Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 21:15

Tricia,
I used Geoff's link without any problem.
Maybe having you email page wide enough helps in the avoidance of
'synthetic' carriage returns.
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: john Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 21:25

Incidentally folks;(if Geoff doesn't get this first) if you can't find Geoff's piece do a search (top right I think) for CITES and it gets you right there.
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: john Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollination.
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 21:40

Hi Roger,
Just a couple of points of possible relevance;
1. The orchid (Ophrys) evolved to ensure/assist its own success, not that of the bee. As for the bee avoiding the 'image', all that is important to the orchid is that, first, it gets recognized as a bee by the pollinator and, of course, that might involve scent (anyone know?). Smart as bees are in their behaviour, I doubt that they have the logical foresight to fear death if they see an attractive mate! On the other hand, premature death of the bee would not be in the orchid's interest either so I'd agree with that bit of your assertion.

2. Unless you don't believe in evolution, why did the genus (Ophrys) mimic bees? It almost certainly wasn't an overnight adaptation, nor was it a fit of artistic creativity by the Management (I would venture to suggest). Of course, I could be wrong but all we (think we) know about mimicry supports the contention of a remarkable evolutionary phenomenon that is far smarter, even if deliberately 'designed' or 'created'.

John.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: john Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators.
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 21:45

Oops Roger,
My main reply to this is in your other email of thanks!
That what comes from reading emails back'ds!
Just off the Germany in the mornin and will pick up the thread (if it ain't broken by then) when I return
Cheers
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Long links − a solution
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 21:50

And it works! very clever Tricia. Must try and get some friends to add
their protest.
Regards, Alex

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Long links − a solution
Date: Sun, 04 Jul 2010 22:55

Glad it helped − just wish I had remembered it earlier!

--

Tricia

Who the hell is General Failure? And why is he reading my harddisk?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Gordon Walker
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Fw: new pricelist 2010/Floráliia/Brasil
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2010 08:20

May be of interest to the chatters and watchers.
Gordon.

Fw: new pricelist 2010/Flor iia/Brasil

SPRING ORCHID SHOW /SEPTEMBER 2010

18TH ESSLINGEN ORCHID SHOW
ESSLINGEN-BERKHEIM AT THE OSTERFELD-HALLE
SEPTEMBER 17-19, 2010

DEAR CUSTOMER,
-YOU CAN ORDER PLANTS AND WE CAN SHIP TO YOUR ADDRESS.
-WE USE GERMANY (D seldorf) AS THE AIRPORT OF ENTRANCE AND FROM THERE WE CAN MAIL YOUR ORDER.
-THE MINIMUM VALUE FOR THE ORDERS IS US$ 100 AND YOU HAVE TO ADD US$ 1,00 PER PLANT TO COVER THE COST FROM BRASIL TO GERMANY .
-THERE IS ALSO A COST (POST OFFICE) FROM GERMANY TO YOUR ADDRESS.
-PLEASE NOTE THAT AFTER WE MAIL THE PLANTS FROM GERMANY WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DELAYS OF DELIVERY, AS THIS IS OUT OF OUR CONTROL.
-ORDERS MUST BE SENT UNTIL JULY 20TH.

Sandra Altenburg Odebrecht
Stephen L.Champlin
Flor ia, Estrada da Flor ia, 592
Niter , RJ, 241.40-216
Brasil
www.floralia.com.br

Price list 2010
This list cancels any previous list
Flor ia Orquid ios Reunidos Ltda
Estrada da Flor ia 592
Niter , Rio de Janeiro
24.140-216
Brasil
discount: over US$ 300,00 − 10%
over US$ 600,00 -20%
over US$ 1,000 − 30%
SPECIES prices in US$
NAME PLANT SIZE US$
Acianthera (Pleurothallis) modesta FS 16
Acianthera purpureoviolacea(Pleurothallis) FS 16
Anacheilium faresianum FS 16
Anacheilum alemanoides FS 18
Anacheilum elisae FS 16
Anacheilum janeirensi NFS 16
Aspasia lunata FS 12
Aspasia silvana FS 16
Baptistonia coloratum (Carriella colorata) NFS 30
Baptistonia echinata FS 16
Baptistonia silvana NFS 16
Bifrenaria aureofulva NFS 16
Bifrenaria harrisoniae FS 15
Bifrenaria inodora 4'' 20
Bifrenaria thyrianthina 'Saito' HCC x self FS 16
Bifrenaria vitellina FS 16
Bifrenariia wittigii NFS 16
Brassavola glauca 3" 10
Brassavola martiana 3'' 15
Brassavola perrinii NFS 12
Brassavola tuberculata 3" 15
Brassia arachonidea NFS 17
Brassia chloroleuca NFS 15
Brassia lawrenceana FS 15
Brassia verrucosa FS 18
Brassia warscewiczii NFS 24
Bulbophyllum ambrosia FS 12
Bulbophyllum lasiochillum FS 16
Bulbophyllum macraei FS 20
Bulbophyllum plumosa FS 15
Bulbophyllum wedelli FS 15
Capanemia superflua FS 16
Catasetum ciliatum FS 18
Catasetum cirrhaeoides dark color NFS 20
Catasetum cirrhaeoides light color NFS 16
Catasetum confusum NFS 20
Catasetum fimbriataum (aureo x green) 2" 15
Catasetum fimbriatum 3" 15
Catasetum gladiatorium NFS 18
Catasetum juruenense NFS 15
Catasetum osculatum (tipo x dark) 2" 17
Catasetum osculatum spotted 3'' 20
Catasetum pileatum 3" 25
Catasetum schmidtianum (dark x dark) 3" 17
Catasetum spitzii 3" 15
Cattleya amethystoglossa (Sereriano x Orchidglade) 4" 18
Cattleya araguaiensis 3" 20
Cattleya bicolor brasiliensis x self 3" 20
Cattleya bicolor 'Colibri' x self NFS 15
Cattleya bicolor puntata amarela x self 3" 20
Cattleya bowringiana coerulea 4'' 15
Cattleya bowringiana tipo 4" 15
Cattleya dolosa tipo FS 25
Cattleya dormaniana NFS 30
Cattleya dowiana aurea 5" 25
Cattleya eldorado NFS 20
Cattleya eldorado (alba x alba) NFS 35
Cattleya eldorado concolor NFS 32
Cattleya elongata 4'' 16
Cattleya forbesii 'Colibri' x self FS 15
Cattleya gaskelliana (v. large x suavissima) 4" 12
Cattleya granulosa 4" 15
Cattleya Hardyana (dowiana x warscewiczii semi alba) FS 25
Cattleya harrisoniae (boa forma x select '19123' 4" 12
Cattleya harrisoniae boa forma x sibling 4" 12
Cattleya intermedia (coerulea x Marginata) FS 12
Cattleya intermedia alba 'Hasegawa' x self FS 25
Cattleya intermedia coerulea x coerulea FS 12
Cattleya intermedia flamea 'Hasegawa' x self FS 25
Cattleya intermedia orlata (good x best '81003') 3" 12
Cattleya intermedia orlata 'Iwasita' x self FS 15
Cattleya kerrii NFS 16
Cattleya labiata (alba x amesiana 'Foleyana') 4" 16
Cattleya labiata (alba x coerulea) 4" 12
Cattleya labiata coerulea 4" 25
Cattleya labiata semi alba (Antonio Paccione x cooksoniae) 4" 20
Cattleya lawrenceana 4" 12
Cattleya leopoldii alba ((Green Jade x Bracey's) x self 3" 15
Cattleya leopoldii tipo x self 4" 12
Cattleya loddigesii alba boa forma x self NFS 10
Cattleya loddigesii alba boa forma x self 3" 10
Cattleya loddigesii coerulensis x sibling NFS 12
Cattleya loddigesii tipo ('4802' x 10802') NFS 10
Cattleya loddigesii tipo (Martinelli x Zorro) NFS 10
Cattleya lueddemaniana (color overlap x Irina) 4" 12
Cattleya maxima 'Jorg' x self 4" 12
Cattleya maxima semi alba x self 4" 20
Cattleya mesquitae FS 18
Cattleya mossiae tipo 4" 12
Cattleya nobilior coerulea 4" 40
Cattleya nobilior tipo FS 18
Cattleya percivaliana (alba x alba) 4" 18
Cattleya percivaliana (Karen Graf x Summit) FS 25
Cattleya rex 4" 20
Cattleya skinneri suavissima NFS 15
Cattleya trianae (amesiana 'Floralia' x alba 'Aniel') 4" 12
Cattleya trianae (Rolf Altenburg x The Primier) 5" 20
Cattleya trianae amesiana ('Floralia' x Aniel') 4" 12
Cattleya velutina' colibri' 3" 25
Cattleya velutina 'Hasegawa' x self FS 40
Cattleya walkeriana (alba 'Suwada' x coerulea) 4" 12
Cattleya walkeriana (Dayana Wenzel x Tokyo) 3" 16
Cattleya walkeriana (Jandira x Dona Nega) 3'' 16
Cattleya walkeriana (Serveriano x Rosita) NFS 16
Cattleya walkeriana (tipo x alba) 4" 12
Cattleya walkeriana (XXX x Bou Khazen) 3" 16
Cattleya warneri (Rubra x orlata) FS 20
Cattleya warneri alba 4" 12
Cattleya warneri concolor (Elvia x Roberto Kauskyi) FS 20
Cattleya warneri suavissima 'Sta. Teresa' x self FS 18
Christensonella juergensi NFS 20
Coelogyne flaccida FS 12
Constantia cipoensis FS 16
Cryptophoranthus schenkii FS 10
Dendrobium anosmum FS 15
Dendrobium lituifolium FS 18
Dendrobium pupureum album 3" 20
Dichaea pendula NFS 15
Encyclia albo-xanthina NFS 16
Encyclia bractense 2" 17
Encyclia cordigera white lip x self 3" 15
Encyclia cyperifolia NFS 16
Encyclia diurna NFS 15
Encyclia edithiana (maderoi) FS 18
Encyclia fowleyi 3" 16
Encyclia gonzalezii FS 16
Encyclia leucantha NFS 15
Encyclia linearifolloides NFS 15
Encyclia odoratissima NFS 12
Encyclia osmantha FS 18
Encyclia randii NFS 18
Epidendrum cristatum NFS 15
Epidendrum revolutum 3" 15
Epidendrum rigidium NFS 15
Epidendrum veroscriptum NFS 20
Epidendrum vesicatum NFS 18
Eurochyne rotschildiana NFS 30
Galeandra stangeana NFS 20
Gomesa crispa FS 20
Ida fimbriata NFS 22
Isabelia (Neolachea ) pulcherrima alba FS 25
Isabelia pulchella (Neolachea pulchella) FS 16
Isabelia virginallis Large FS 20
Laelia alaorii FS 18
Laelia angereri NFS 16
Laelia bradei FS 16
Laelia briegeri FS 16
Laelia cinnabarina NFS 16
Laelia crispa (Vinicolor x flamea aquinada) FS 30
Laelia crispilabia FS 16
Laelia dayana NFS 20
Laelia endsfeldzii FS 16
Laelia esalaqueana FS 16
Laelia fidelensis 4" 20
Laelia flava FS 16
Laelia fourneri FS 12
Laelia ghyllanyi FS 16
Laelia harpophylla NFS 20
Laelia jongheana FS 20
Laelia kautskyana (sny L. cowanii) 3" 15
Laelia kettieana FS 16
Laelia lobata alba boa forma x self 4" 12
Laelia lobata tipo FS 18
Laelia lundii FS 15
Laelia mantiqueirae 3" 12
Laelia milleri FS 16
Laelia pfisteri NFS 16
Laelia praestans FS 15
Laelia purpurata (a x a ) FS 20
Laelia purpurata (estriata x estriata) 4" 10
Laelia purpurata (rubra x sanguinea) FS 22
Laelia purpurata a 'Brissiano' x self 4" 12
Laelia purpurata a x a 5" 20
Laelia purpurata carnea ('1012' x dk lip) 5" 12
Laelia purpurata carnea (dk lip x '1012') 5" 12
Laelia purpurata carnea (dk lip x '3122') 5" 12
Laelia purpurata carnea (dk lip x 'St. Nicolau') 5" 12
Laelia purpurata estriata 'Doracy' x self 4" 12
Laelia purpurata estritata x estriata 4" 12
Laelia purpurata rosa cereja 3" 15
Laelia purpurata roxo-bispo x self 4" 18
Laelia purpurata roxo-violeta x self 4" 18
Laelia purpurata werkhauseri x sibling 4" 15
Laelia reginae FS 15
Laelia rupestris (crispata) 3" 12
Laelia sanguiloba 3" 16
Laelia tenebrosa x self 4" 12
Laelia tenebrosa 'Colibri' x self FS 25
Laelia tenebrosa 'Maria Fuma ' x self NFS 20
Leptotes bicolor FS 16
Leptotes unicolor FS 16
Masdevallia discoides FS 15
Masdevallia herradurae FS 15
Masdevallia infracta FS 15
Masdevallia infracta 'albescens' FS 25
Masdevallia infracta 'Chocolate' FS 18
Masdevallia infracta 'Marron' FS 18
Masdevallia infracta 'Yellow' FS 18
Masdevallia oscitans FS 25
Masdevallia triangularis FS 18
Maxillaria cerifera FS 12
Maxillaria cognauxiana FS 16
Maxillaria crysantha FS 15
Maxillaria picta FS 15
Maxillaria porphyrosthele FS 12
Maxillaria schunkeana /schunkii FS 15
Maxillaria vitelliniflora FS 16
Miltonia spectabilis alba FS 20
Miltonia spectabilis moorelana FS 16
Miltonia spectabilis mooreliana 4 N FS 30
Miltonia warscewiczii FS 15
Mormodes elegans 3" 18
Octomeria gracilis FS 12
Oncidium barbatum FS 16
Oncidium crispum NFS 17
Oncidium enderianum FS 17
Oncidium fuscatum (chamaeleorchis warscewiczii) FS 30
Oncidium harrisonianum FS 16
Oncidium hians FS 15
Oncidium longipes FS 12
Oncidium nanum NFS 15
Oncidium oliganthum FS 15
Oncidium pubes FS 16
Oncidium sarcodes FS 16
Oncidium varicosum FS 16
Phymatidium tillansioides FS 15
Pleurothallis grobyii FS 16
Pleurothallis leptotifolia FS 16
Pleurothallis luteola FS 16
Pleurothallis prolifera FS 16
Pleurothallis pterophora FS 20
Pleurothallis sonderana FS 16
Pleurothallis teres FS 16
Prostechea regentiae FS 16
Rodriguezia fragrans FS 12
Rodriguezia secunda (lanceolata) FS 15
Sarcochillus hatmannii fs 17
Schomburgkia crispa FS 25
Schomburgkia crispa 4" 12
Schomburgkia crispa alba 3" 20
Sigmatostalix radicans FS 12
Sophronitella violacea FS 16
Sophronitis cernua FS 16
Sophronitis roseum (wittigiana) FS 16
Stanhopea insignis 3" 16
Stanhopea litzei NFS 16
Xilobium squalens FS 10
Zygopetalum crinitum 4" 18
Zygopetalum triste FS 16
Zygostates grandiflora NFS 20
HYBRIDS
Name Size Price USD
-BLC. (SWEET ANNIVERSARY X (GOLDENZELLE X EMPRESS ELIZABETH) FS 10
Lc.Plum Perfection x Laelia sincorana FS 15
CATTLEYA SEA BREEZE ALBA FS 10
Blc. Crispin Rosales x Lc.Flor ia's Triumph 4'' 10
Lc.(Jo Antonio Nicoli x Flor ia's triumph) 4'' 10
Cattleya (loddigesii x Old Sierra) FS 10
Laelia purpurata x C.Marjorie Hausermann FS 15
C.( nobilior x Marjorie Hausermann) FS 10
C. Penny Kuroda x Lc.Jo Antonio Nicoli FS 10
C.(gaskelliana coerulea x lawrenceana coerulea) FS 10
Laelia tenebrosa x Cattleya Penny Kuroda FS 10
Lc.Plum Perfection x Brassavola perrinii FS 15
LC. (ORQUIDACEA'S ORANGE DOLL X C. CHOCOLATE DROP) X L. XANTHINA FS 10
Blc.Holiday Inn x C.Enid Buterfly xBc.Pastoral 4'' 10
C. Penny Kuroda x L. tenebrosa FS 10
Blc.Goldenzelle x(Lc.Festival de ouro xC.aurant.) FS 10
Cattleya (Penny Kuroda x Corcovado) FS 10
C. Intertexta alba (warneri x mossiae) FS 10
C.intermedia coerulea x C.(gaskelliana x lawrenceana) coerulea FS 10
Lc.(C.Mother Dominican x Persepolis'splendor) x Mildred Rives FS 10
Lc.(Desert Jewel x Irene Finney) FS 10
Blc Bow Bryce x Kings Canyon FS 10
C. Interglossa (intermedia x amethystoglossa) FS 10
Cattleya loddigesii x Schomburgkia undulata FS 10
C.Cyril x (Bc.Turandot x C.Old Whitey) FS 10
Blc.Sea Sound x Bc.Pure Spirit FS 10
Bc.Pure Spirit x Lc.Desert Jewel FS 10
Blc. (Tampico x Flor ia's Storm) FS 10
6816 Blc. Mem. Crispin Rosales x Lc Bonanza Queen FS 10
BLC SUNSTATES PEAK DOWN 5" 10
Cattleya Undine alba(intermedia x mossiae) FS 10
Blc.Northeast Passage x Lc.(Gold Digger x Trick or Treat) FS 10
C.(gaskelliana x lawrenceana) coerulea x intermedia coerulea FS 10
(L.rupestris x Pot.Yellow Hill) x Lc. Straight Answer FS 10
C.(Valentine coerulea x Cattleya intermedia coerulea) FS 10
C.Hybrida '1901' x Lc.Plum Perfection FS 10
Cattleya Claesiana coerulea FS 10
C. Penny Kuroda x C. violacea semi alba estriata FS 10
Blc.Sunstate's Peak Down FS 10
Laelia tenebrosa x Blc.Toshie Aoki FS 10
Cattleya Pedra da G ea FS 10
L.Pulcherrima coerulea (L.lobata x L.purpurata) FS 10
Lc.Sparkling Spot x C.intermedia var.orlata FS 10
Lc.Ranger Six'A-OK' x C.trianae alba 4`` 10
Blc Sea Sounds x Bc Turandot 4" 10
Blc.(Cornerstone x Floralias Storm) 4'' 10
Cattleya (Pedra da G ea x Kerchoveana) FS 10
Bc.Turandot'Guaxup x C.Ruth Gee 4`` 10
BLC. SUNSTATES PEAK DOWN 5" 10
LAELIA TENEBROSA X BLC. TOSHIE AOKI `PIZZAZ` FS 10
C. Pedra da Gavea FS 10
LAELIA PULCHERRIMA COERULEA 5" 10
BLC.(RANGER SIX A-OK X CATTLEYA TRIANAEI ALBA) 4" 10
BLC. (SEA SOUNDS X BC. TURANDOT 'GUAXUPE') 4" 10
(BLC. MARY TUAVERA X C.SIERRA BLANCA) X BC. TURANDOT 4" 10
C(labiata amesiana x trianae amesiana) FS 10
C.(WHITEI COERULEA X VALENTINE COERULEA) 4" 10
LC. TRICK OR TREAT X (L. RUPESTRIS X POT. YELLOW HILL) 4" 10
BLC. FLOR IA S STORM X SELF 4" 10
C. Cantagalo FS 10
Blc Sea Sounds x Bc Pure Spirt 4" 10
Bc.(Turandot 'Guaxupe' x C. Ruth Gee 'Diamond Jubilee' 4" 10
Lc Trick or Treat x L. kautskyi NFS 10
C. intermedia tipo boa x C. Pedra da Gavea 4" 10
Bc Pastoral semi alba x Blc Kay Franklin x Enid Moore 4'' 10
LC. ORGLADE S GRAND X C. (INTERGLOSSA X BRABANTIAE) NFS 10
LC. C. G. ROEBLING 4" 10
C.nobilior amaliae x violacea semi alba estriata NFS 10
BLC.(LC.IRENE FINNEY 'SPRINGS BEST' X FLORALIA'S STORM) 4" 10
C.Penny Kuroda x Lc. Amber Penny FS 10
7032 LC. FONTE DA SAUDADE FS 10
LC. ORQUIDACEA'S ORANGE DOLL X BLC.MOMILANI RAINBOW 4" 10
BLC.(GOLDENZELLE X POKAI TANGERINE ) NFS 10
C.Dipozzi Tiziano 'Blue' x intermedia coerulea '6803' 4" 10
L.DAYANA X (L. SINCORANA X LC. MEM.JACK HAYDEN) NFS 10
Blc(Capt. Pessoa x C(Picasso x Shorewood) x Bc Turandot 4'' 10
Blc Castle Princess x Lc Desert Jewel 4'' 10
Cattleya (Dubiosa x nobilior) 4" 10
C. Valentine coerulea x Lc Cornelia coerulea 4'' 10
Lc Trick or Treat x (L. kautskyi x Slc Mine Gold) 4'' 10
Cattleya Claesiana coerulea 4'' 10
Lc Desert Jewel 'May Flower' x Blc. Castle Princess No. 1 4'' 10
Blc Cornerstone x Blc Floralias Storm 4'' 10
Bc Pastoral 'Pink Pearl' x Blc Floralias Storm 4'' 10
C.Valentine coerulea x (gaskelliana x lawrenceana) coerulea 4" 10
Lc Trick or Treat x Pot Love Call 4" 10
C.(Mem Jack Hayden coerulea x C Olivia coerulea 4'' 10
BLC. (ORQUIDACEA'S PETAL FLOWER X SAKARUGARI) 4" 10
BLC.(ERICA PORTO X RECORDANDO EN BLANCO) 4" 10
BLC. (CASTLE FLARE X MALWORTH D OR ) 3" 10
LC. TRICK OR TREAT X (L. KAUTKYII X SLC. MINE GOLD) 4" 10
CATTLEYA CLAESIANA COERULEA 3" 10
BLC.(CORNERSTONE X FLORALIA'S STORM) 4" 10
C.(GASKELLIANA X LAWRENCEANA) X C. VALENTINE COERULEA 4" 10
POT.(LC. TRICK OR TREAT X LOVE CALL 'NORA) NFS 10
LC.MEM.JACK HAYDEN COERULEA X C. INTERMEDIA COERULEA AQUINII 3" 10
C. HYBRIDA 901 X C.(INTERGLOSSA X BRABANTIAE) 4" 10
LC. MEM. JACK HAYDEN COERULEA X C. OLIVIA COERULEA AQUINII 3" 10
C(Old Sierra x Blc(Capt. Pessoa x Picasso) 4'' 10
C. Olivia coerulea aquinii x (gaskelliana x lawrenceana) coerulea 4'' 10
C. OLIVIA COERULEA X C.(LAWRENCEANA X GASKELLIANA) coerulea 4" 10
(BC.TURANDOT X[ BLC.CAPT.PESSOA) X BLC. (SHOREWOOD X PICASSO)] 4" 10
BLC. TAKANAU SEKI X IDEM 4" 10
C.RAINBOW DROP UTUADO 4" 10
BlcConcordia 'Baton' x C. intermedia flamea 5" 10
LC. JO PAULO FONTES X BLC. OCONEE 4" 10
LC.(Orquidacea's Orange Doll X C. CHOCOLATE DROP)X SLC. PURPLE FANTASY 4'' 10
C(gaskelliana x lawrenceana) coerulea x Olivia coerulea aquinii 4" 10
Lc. Tahoe Rose 4'' 10
BLC. CASTLE PRINCESS X BC. PASTORAL SEMI-ALBA 4" 10
(BC.TURANDOTX (C.PICASSO X SHOREWOOD)) X BLC. CAPT.PESSOA 4" 10
BC. CAIO RAMOS X BLC. POKAI TANGERINE 4'' 10
BLC. (JULIO BARBIERO X SAINT HELENA SOUND) 4" 10
(BRYCE CANYON X JO PAULO FONTES) 4" 10
MERISTEMS
NAME PLANT SIZE Price USD
Lc.Tyl Belle`Fantasy` 4" 15
SLC. TROPICAL FLARE 'MAGIC FIRE' FS 20
Lc.Puppy Love ' True Beauty' HCC/AOS FS 20
Blc.Goldenzelle 'Saddle Peak' FS 20
Cattleya Old Sierra (large white) 4" 15
Blc.Chia Lin 'New City' 4" 15
Slc. Jewel Box ''SCHEHERAZADE' FS 15

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2010 09:20

Yes, I guess it would work if everyone's pages were formatted the
same, but what are the chances of that? Not a lot!

I too reached the page without any problem but I was unable to log in
to leave a comment as the site was too busy. However, I did note the
comments already there (including yours) and totally agree.

On 04 Jul, in article ,
john Stanley wrote:
> Tricia,
> I used Geoff's link without any problem.
> Maybe having you email page wide enough helps in the avoidance of
> 'synthetic' carriage returns.
> John

--

Tricia

Motorcar: a four-wheeled vehicle that runs up hills and down pedestrians.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: john Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators (remembered not forgotten).
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2010 10:15

Yeah,
I know what you mean; I sometimes wish I'd a couple of USB ports on my temple but then I'd forget where I'd put the relevant memory stick. I often wonder how many Gig I have in there (cranium) and how much is now corrupted to 'thingy', 'whats-its-name' or 'y'know'!
I reckon memory declines alphabetically, ending with ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzz....!
(Just keep taking the pills!)

As for bee orchids; we often look at them at Aberffraw, Anglesey. They used to be more prolific in the sandy wheel-tracks when cars crossed the dunes to the beach. Eventually, (late 70s I think) cars were banned for the very sensible conservation/environmental reason that they were 'tearing up' the dunes and causing blow-outs. Unfortunately (I suspect), the bee orchids rather liked the disturbed sand they caused but, all these years later, they can still be found along the barely recognizeable overgrown tracks in places I fondly imagine to be where I used to struggle to avoid running them over.

Between 1988 and 2002 I used to co-lead geological jaunts to the Canaries and I became quite used to re-discovering individual plants in exactly the same spot. In one case (Tenerife), photographically precisely near the refreshment van before the winding incline to Santiago del Teide. I'm sure it was literally the same plant I re-discovered almost annually.
John

David Martin wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators.

> I have been storing away knowledge and facts for the last 70 years,
> the only problem is, I now have trouble accessing it !!
> David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Bee orchids.
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2010 16:10

Hi all,

One point that I would like to make is this. Many people think that ALL of the Ophrys species look like Bees, but this is not so. Here in the U.K. the four Ophrys species look like three different insects, namely the Bee, the Spider and the Wasp.

It gets very confused by some people some of the time, but it sure is a nice subject.

Cheers, Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.
Date: Mon, 05 Jul 2010 18:10

Went to Wakehurst Place today, and just after going through the front entrance, there is an area with lots of bee orchids.
David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 09:00

Mornin' David,

That's good news, did you get on your hands and knees??? Did you take any photos???

Thanks for the information.

Cheers, Rodge.

P.S. Many years ago I saw a group of 'Jersey orchids' that they had there. Orchis laxiflora to give it its botanical name.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 12:00

Hello Rodge,
I didn't take a camera as we have been there many times before. The area is under some large trees and has a small fence so they are safe from peoples feet. A notice had been erected saying that they have never been seen there before and they like calcareous soil, which this isn't. They also said that the bee used for pollination was extinct in the UK. I noticed that the area they were growing in was covered in deep bark litter and the grassland around the edge didn't have any Bee orchids in. My wife and I stood there a long time trying to see if there were any growing in the long grass but couldn't see a single specimen. We counted up and came to a rough 35 to 50 plants in all.
David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Cattleyas: Dry sheath "syndrome"
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 16:55

Calling all gurus!

1st let me stop and say what an increadible wealth of knowledge you all are, it is truly my privlidge to be part of this group.

Dry Cat sheaths.... "Where did the freaking flower go", I have been waiting a year for this flower.....

Are these from lack of water? too much light? lack of humidity????

Jim

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators (remembered not forgotten).
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 19:45

John said. I became quite used to re-discovering individual plants in
exactly the same spot. In one case (Tenerife), photographically precisely
near the refreshment van before the winding incline to Santiago del Teide.
I'm sure it was literally the same plant..

I'm sure it was. They are , after all, perennials !

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 19:50

If it were someone else I would think this a wind-up. But I'll believe you
David.

Any speculation would be of interest.

Of course- I think all will agree ? the plants must have been there before,
but had not flowered before/had not been noticed before. Maybe it took last
years floods/last winters freeze/this years drought,- one or all − to
trigger mass flowering ?

Geoff

David Martin wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.

> Hello Rodge,

> I didn't take a camera as we have been there many times before. The
> area is under some large trees and has a small fence so they are
> safe from peoples feet. A notice had been erected saying that they
> have never been seen there before and they like calcareous soil,
> which this isn't. They also said that the bee used for pollination
> was extinct in the UK. I noticed that the area they were growing in
> was covered in deep bark litter and the grassland around the edge
> didn't have any Bee orchids in. My wife and I stood there a long
> time trying to see if there were any growing in the long grass but
> couldn't see a single specimen. We counted up and came to a rough
> 35 to 50 plants in all.

> David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cattleyas: Dry sheath "syndrome"
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 19:55

It just happens . I think sometimes the plant produces the sheath and never
produces buds. Or sometimes they produce buds and they don't develop.

Not a big deal − disappointing of course − but like I said, stuff happens..

For me, its usually on the plant which I think might be just right for the
next show, and I count up all the flowers its going to have. my dad used to
say, "don't count your chickens before they hatch".. how right he was.

geoff

JIM MATEOSKY wrote re: [OrchidTalk] Cattleyas: Dry sheath "syndrome"

> Calling all gurus!

> 1st let me stop and say what an increadible wealth of knowledge you
> all are, it is truly my privlidge to be part of this group.

> Dry Cat sheaths.... "Where did the freaking flower go", I have been
> waiting a year for this flower.....

> Are these from lack of water? too much light? lack of humidity????

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Tue, 06 Jul 2010 21:55

Geoff − I have emailed CANWOS and NEOS suggesting that members take a
look at your web page regarding the CITES rules. Maybe if a good few vote
'Iagree' they could be altered.
You mentioned that you have written to Sarah Rittershausen and I wondered
if she would mention it in her monthly email newsletter. It must go out
to quite a few orchid people.
Maybe OrchidTalkers in other societies could drum up a bit of support too
and we mustnt forget Australians, all still part of the Empire :-)

Regards, Alex

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.
Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2010 07:15

I have to agree with Geoff on this one. It would not be possible for so many orchids to have grown (and flowered) from seed in just one year, so the plants must have been there for a number of years and never noticed before.

It is, however, amazing proof of how resilient some of our own orchids are!

Francis

Geoffrey Hands wrote RE: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.

> If it were someone else I would think this a wind-up. But I ll
> believe you David. Any speculation would be of interest. Of
> course- I think all will agree ? the plants must have been there
> before, but had not flowered before/had not been noticed before.
> Maybe it took last years floods/last winters freeze/this years
> drought,- one or all − to trigger mass flowering ?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators (remembered not forgotten).
Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2010 07:20

I have wondered about this one, though!

Would it be correct to call them perennials when the actual tuber, corm or whatever you will shrivels up and dies after producing the next year's corm or tuber (or tuberous roots)? Or would that make them annuals?

Food for thought!

Francis

Geoffrey Hands wrote RE: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchid pollinators (remembered not forgotten).

> John said I became quite used to re-discovering individual plants
> in exactly the same spot. In one case (Tenerife), photographically
> precisely near the refreshment van before the winding incline to
> Santiago del Teide. I'm sure it was literally the same plant

> I m sure it was. They are , after all, perennials !

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we can do something about it now !
Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2010 08:35

Yes ; Sara said she would look at it when she got back from the Hampton
Court Show − which Burnham are doing this year instead of Chelsea ( "London
has got to be too expensive...") . Actually, Burnham have more of a
commercial interest than most − Brian has told me that they used to have a
good export trade, and now its all gone − at £47 per plant for the export
permit , its not surprising !

I also copied to BOGA ( via Peter White, currently Secty, or maybe he is
chair − whatever).

But as to Australia ? No − it's the UK regs which can be altered by our
current Trade Secty ,( Vince Cable ? )
To change the Ozzie regs, they need to get onto their own people. They can't
try and pass the buck to the EU either, since it has nothing to do with
their regs.

Geoff

Alex wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES − this is important − please read it − we
can do something about it now !

> You mentioned that you have written to Sarah Rittershausen and I
> wondered if she would mention it in her monthly email newsletter.
> It must go out to quite a few orchid people.

> Maybe OrchidTalkers in other societies could drum up a bit of
> support too and we mustnt forget Australians, all still part of the
> Empire :-)

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.
Date: Wed, 07 Jul 2010 15:50

It's no windup. I hope someone else goes to Wakehurst Place and confirms my observations. The only thing I can think of is that some new topsoil has been put down with the orchids contained within it, and then covered in deep bark litter.
David

francis quesada pallares wrote RE: [OrchidTalk] Bee orchids.

> I have to agree with Geoff on this one. It would not be possible
> for so many orchids to have grown (and flowered) from seed in just
> one year, so the plants must have been there for a number of years
> and never noticed before.

> It is, however, amazing proof of how resilient some of our own
> orchids are!

> Francis

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