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2010 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

April 1—7

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Fw: Emailing: 002 (3), 003 (2), 004
Date: Thu, 01 Apr 2010 16:20

Two of my plants just in flower.

1) Aerangis fastuosa

2) Dendrobium margaretaceum, plant looks almost dead but new growths
starting.

3) Dendrobium margaretaceum, the flower is upside down, that's why I
held it. Bought it at the London Orchid show.

David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Aerangis fastuosa and Dendrobium margaretaceum
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 12:45

That is a great looking Aerangis − both flowers and leaves. Are those
flowers on 1 or how many spikes? And what of the temperature for growth. I
thought it would need more heat than I provide ( MNW 15ºc) I have several
other related species that do fine.

I have D bellatulum, which is similar to the D margaritaceum. It has done
very well for a couple of years but is now looking like it's declining a bit
though in bud at the moment. I believe it has a reputation for being
difficult. Does anyone have any tips for success?

Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: D anosmum
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 12:55

Hi Alex

I just noticed today that my D anosmum is showing the first signs of flowering − pic attached. I have also found a set of records I kept for flowering in 2004. That particular plant flowered in June of that year.

Andy

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From: Bill Haldane
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Coping with a Hard Wter Supply
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 15:20

I have moved to west Suffolk which has a very hard public water supply and a relatively low rainfall.As I have limited opportunity to collect rainwater I am looking at the potential for using a reverse osmosis system to provide clean water and would appreciate hearing from anyone with experience of such systems with any useful advice they may have.
Fortunately my orchids are still enjoying a soft water supply in Devon but they are due to join me in a few weeks time.
Bill Haldane

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coping with a Hard Wter Supply
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 21:05

Yes ; I used RO for some years when I moved to an area in a "rain shadow
zone" and the public water supply proved to be fatal to my orchids ( water
from bore-holes in the very deep clay − ca 1000 ft deep − in the Vale of
Evesham, Worcestershire − and my house was surrounded by miles and miles of
vegetable growers, all producing wonderful cabbages etc, by pouring nitrates
on the soil, which ended up in the water as nitrites etc. − quite poisonous
to epiphytes. Watering equipment had to include a wheelbarrow for the latest
crop of corpses.until I tried RO)

My greenhouse then − a 40 x 10 , was made from metal extrusions which used
to be sold by a firm at Bristol (?_Alitex ?) but the gutter they provided on
the eaves bars was about 1cm sq, and in conjunction with an annual rainfall
of about 16 inches, made rain water a very rare commodity.

The problem with RO is that you have to throw away 4 gallons (say) for every
1 gallon you keep. When you get into it you will understand why, and save me
a lot of explanation. Perhaps you know already. I ran my RO constantly − but
the usage , although metered, was not very expensive. RO works on high
pressures and low volumes. Maybe this is useful info, since you may be able
to choose which tap you run your RO from. ( In my present bungalow,
surrounded on all 4 sides by garden, I have outside taps on two walls, and
can easily run hoses through windows on the other two ; but because of the
way the pipes are laid out in the house, the water pressure is much high on
one side than the others ; that's the side to connect the RO.

I also saved the "waste water" ( I have now forgotten the technical terms, -
'solute', etc,) I used the waste for watering my garden, and washing the
car.

I had been taught − by the late Bob Dadd ( Greenwaway Orchids, near
Weston-super-Mare − himself an industrial chemist before he retired and
became an orchid nursery owner ) that having "taken everything out" of the
tap water, I had to put it all back. I started using Calcium Nitrate/RO
water mixed to 500 mS , Maxicrop seaweed-originated fertiliser the same, and
a general purpose 6:6:6 fertiliser the same, combined equal parts of all
three, and corrected the pH to 6.0. After 6 weeks or so, I noticed
something strange on my Phal seedlings ( this was circa 1984 , long before
the days of phallies from the garden centre − if you wanted them you
imported compots from USA) − they were growing aroid leaves ; that is to say
a leaf which had started out growing say one inch wide, suddenly developed a
step and the growing part − next to the stem was 2 inches wide. They really
were this weird shape. Of course new leaves starting from scratch were 2
inches wide too. I also found that my paphs − which I had been struggling
with for 20 years were bigger every time I watered them. I could see them
growing.I had never been there before !

RO is really the best. I'm not at all sure that the rainwater I use now (
from generous gutters on the greenhouse and water tubs all round the quite
large area of the bungalow , so that I can collect 500 litres quite easily
from a mere heavy shower ) is quite as good , although that subjective test
- " can you see the plants growing" can still be answered positively.

If you need any more info , let me know − I used RO at that first address,
quite exclusively for some 10 years, and my water supply at the next house
was not sufficient so I used it partly − with my RO machines No 2 and 3 ,
for another 10 years. )

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: 2 minis out now
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 21:10

It's been a horrible day here in the Mendips and so I have been doing a few bits in the orchidhouse − here's a couple that are out now.

Dendrobium porphyrochilum − well coming out anyway − from Sikkim through to Thailand. IOSPE says 6-10 flowers on a spike but this has 20 something. Four spikes to come. Flowers about 1cm.

Masdevallia asterotricha. I have several of these and there always seems to be a flower or two one of them though never lots at once as yet.

Andy

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] D anosmum
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 21:25

Hello Andy − thank you very much, had a look at mine but nothing yet but
its early days if they flower in June. I have given mine some water -
hope it helps!
Regards, Alex

> Hi Alex
>
> I just noticed today that my D anosmum is showing the first signs of
> flowering − pic attached. I have also found a set of records I kept for
> flowering in 2004. That particular plant flowered in June of that year.
>
> Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From:
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Zygopetalum Lovely Lady
Date: Sun, 04 Apr 2010 05:35

This is one of our crossses, flowerspikes are short, personally I do like
that as this orchid can be used not only by orchidlovers byut also for people
with palludariums. it is a very compact plant. I do not know if we still
have it available when in Peterborough, I hope so. Next week I will show
some other introductions.

If you do not know what epric is, please be so kind to visit the following
link, thats a short introduction:

http://www.epric.org/index.php?cid15

greetings
Frank Supplie
The Epric Foundation
www.epric.org

(We still have a few for sale at the moment for euro 12 including postage,
if interested please contact us at epric@telfort.nl )

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coping with a Hard Wter Supply
Date: Sun, 04 Apr 2010 10:30

Hey Bill,

Missed you at the London show, as you were the only one from our 'Ecuador' trip I didn't see!

I have recently bought a RO system to install at home. It should be supplying about 50 gallons a day, but it is actually suplying about over 5!

I've called the company, and they have told me that the tubes might have been connected the wrong way round (from the factory, not from my end). I haven't had the time to have a look, as I have people staying at the moment, but as soon as they are off tomorrow I will have about two weeks to check and sort out any problems with the system. Of course, I do not have a greenhouse, so it is connected to the pipes in my kitchen. It is not complicated to use, and it was only £99.

Hope it helps.

Francis

--- El sáb, 3/4/10, Bill Haldane escribió:

> I have moved to west Suffolk which has a very hard public water
> supply and a relatively low rainfall.As I have limited opportunity
> to collect rainwater I am looking at the potential for using a
> reverse osmosis system to provide clean water and would appreciate
> hearing from anyone with experience of such systems with any useful
> advice they may have.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From:
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchid exchange and Annual Meeting
Date: Sun, 04 Apr 2010 13:05

Hello All,

Orchid exchange and sale by hobbyists at the 8th of May 2010 at EPRIC Foundation,
also there is the annual meeting of the Dutch Orchid Society.

A lot of tables are booked and ther ewill be a lot of orchids exchanged or
sold.

Yhe place is Epric Foundation, Nieuwediep 9a, 6851 GB Huissen, The Netherlands
http://www.epric.org

greetings

Frank

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: rudolf günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Paphs, Phrag and Catasetum
Date: Sun, 04 Apr 2010 19:05

Hello all,

I haven't contributed for a longer time. That's all a matter of time as long
as you are employed and not retired.

But I'm still alive and kicking as you see.

Over the years I've got some photos in stock I want to share with you.

Paph concolor var. longipetalum and Paph appletonianum are in flower right
now. Some others of my Paphs
are spiking and some buds are about to open so there will be more photos
very soon.

Phragmipedium ’Olaf Gruss' is the very first Phrag I've flowered ever! The
first shot with just one open flower
was taken a fortnight ago and the second one today.

Catasetum pileatum flowered in early February this year.

Paph violascens, Paph gratrixianum and Paph tonsum were in flower in autumn
2009.

I hope you like these photos.

Best regards from Germany, rudolf

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Paphs, Phrag and Catasetum
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 07:25

Thank you for your contribution Rudolf. It's good to see pictures of other
members orchids. The one which strikes me as particularly interesting is
your concolor . It is remarkable, and atypical. I have never seen any of
the brachy' paphs with that median line along the petals. It is of course
commonplace in section insigne and then seems to carry through into
inter-sectional hybrids. The pouch is also at the extreme of the range of
shape, being almost conical, whereas every other concolor I have ever seen,
or seen illustrated, has the mouth of the pouch smaller in diameter, with
the largest diameter lower down. I suspect it is a hybrid.

But then, the range of variations in most paph species is so great that Dr.
Cribb has gone so far as to say that the whole concept of genus and species
( a man-made classification system) simply does not work very well with
paphs.

But whatever it is, it is interesting to see it.

geoff

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From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: The cold weather in south Florida helped some orchids.
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 18:30

The skinneri clones seem to be better than I have ever had.

Take a look at some of the other clones:
http://togofcoralgables.com/FlowersofApril10.aspx

C. skinneri 'Carpenteria' FCC/AOS:
http://togofcoralgables.blogspot.com/2010/04/c-skinneri-carpentaria-fccaos.html

C skinneri '66th St.':
http://togofcoralgables.blogspot.com/2010/04/c-skinneri-66th-st.html

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Aerangis fastuosa and Dendrobium margaretaceum
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 21:00

Hello Andy,

The flowers on Aerangis fastuosa are on three spikes, four, one and
four flowers. The temperature is 18C to 21C during the winter and up
to 30 plus in the Summer. I grow it very shady, no sun whatsoever.

How do you grow D bellatum? Any suggestions for growing Den
margaritaceum, I assume from the looks of the plant that it needs to
be grown very dry and cool in the winter, with lots of water in the
Summer, in bright light. I notice that it isn't attached to the slab
of composite cork I bought it on but tied round with soft wire. Is
there a better mount that might suit it?

David

"Andy" wrote re: [OrchidTalk] Aerangis fastuosa and Dendrobium margaretaceum

> That is a great looking Aerangis − both flowers and leaves. Are those
> flowers on 1 or how many spikes? And what of the temperature for growth.
> I thought it would need more heat than I provide ( MNW 15ºc) I have
> several other related species that do fine.
>
> I have D bellatulum, which is similar to the D margaritaceum. It has done
> very well for a couple of years but is now looking like it's declining a
> bit though in bud at the moment. I believe it has a reputation for being
> difficult. Does anyone have any tips for success?
>
> Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: New pics
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 21:40

344. One of several Tolumnias I bought last year − mostly hybrids − now
(all) flowering with branched spikes. Super, and it seems very easy. The
strange (?) background is the sky seen through new bubble-pak insulation -
the shot taken pointing the camera up instead of getting the plant down. As
you will gather it lives in the roof of the greenhouse.

345 . I think I showed this cattleya last year ; this year with 20+ flowers.
Very difficult to get the intense dark blood red colour right − buta pic
with the next message and a further batch, under different lighting is a bit
nearer than this one.

346 My C.Jewel Box ( 346) is labelled as var Scheherezade, and I thought it
pretty good − four flowering growths, more than a dozen flowers , but when I
took it to my Orchid Soc. Someone else had a Jewel Box − identical flowers,
but a much more intense colour − knocked my plant into a cocked hat..

347. I didn't put all the names down here, it's a nice hybrid, good size
flowers too − 4 inches or so.

348. Carter & Holmes were offering a collection of I think five different
clones of their Slc Final Touch , which I ordered from Laurence Hobbs when
he did his annual importation last year ; but by the time his order got in,
they had sold out of some of them − at least in notionally flowering sizes ;
this is one they did send as a seedling in a 2 inch pot, and to my surprise
( and maybe their's too) it flowered for me. An unusual delicate colour. But
it is an awarded form − and "Mendenhall" is the name they keep for some of
their best varieties.

349. I was interested to see the same species/variety in flower at the
London Orchid Show a couple of weeks ago, newly imported from Peru or maybe
Columbia ; flowering in the Southern hemisphere at the same time as my plant
.This may be due to the supplementary lighting I have been using , and the
'normal' flowering season here is Autumn ?

350. Another one where it is difficult to get the colour right ; quite a
small flower as white's often are − due to the influence of P.niveum, itself
a very small flowered paph and the basis of much white paph breeding.

351. Someone else showed this species recently, or the same plant under
another name. My plant has cmes up to say 6 inches, and I bought it as
delicatum , so that's how it stays.

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: the other half....
Date: Mon, 05 Apr 2010 22:00

352. Polystachya coriscentis. I have shown the flowers previously. Today I
thought the foliage looked poor, so knocked it out of its pot, and
discovered this unusual root system ( which apart from the colour looks very
healthy) , so I just repotted it in fresh compost. I can't recall ever
seeing beetroot coloured roots on an orchid, before !

353. Catasetum tenebrosa , I guess the specific name has something to do
with the colouring, but I can't quite bring it to mind.

354. Another member here showed a Ren citrina some time ago , it was then
new to me. I saw one at a show , I guess it was the Malayan chap , at
Peterborough last year) , not in flower , and bought it. It has grown well (
Ren's like my conditions it seems) and this is my first flowering , a well
branched spike with 40 flowers.

355 Twinkles can be all sorts of colours, since the Neofinetia falcata
parent itself can be white , the usual form , or yellow or pink, and the
Asctm parent varies too, although more between yellow and dark orange. This
accounts for the variation seen in the illustrations in Orchidwiz for
example , although most are the colour I show here, I think..

356 Another Tolumnia hybrid , I neglected to write the name down and don't
fancy a trip to the greenhouse with a torch now, but this is a very jazzy
flower I think.

357. I often have a basket of plants in my hall , this week it's Begonia rex
varieties with just three orchid plants tucked in , one of which is the
Hsiang-Yu Red Pearl, but this pic is much nearer the true colour than the
one I sent with my last mail.

358. Sedirea japonica ( used to be called Aerides, and then someone decided
it was sufficiently different to be in a different genus , and Sedirea is an
anagram of Aerides , it's a montypic genus , i.e. this is the only species
in the genus at present.). This is the best flowering I have achieved of
this species, which delights me . 12 flowers ( including a few buds still
developing at the end of the spike).

359 Nothing special , a reedstem epi , but I like them , especially if they
flower only a foot or half a metre above the bench , unlike say E.radicans
which flowers up in the roof. The deep colour is the reason it was
meristemmed I guess, and the reason I bought it too.

360. One of the few phals not packed away in my new growing enclosure after
cutting all spikes off, in attempts to grow really good plants ( the
enclosure is a bubble-pak tent in the greenhouse, with its own fan heater
and a stat set to 25 deg). This is almost a primary hybrid , at least much
nearer to species phals than the big Marks and Spencer types ; actually ¼ P
micholitz, ¼ mannii, 1/3 amboinensis and the remainder violacea. A lot of
substance, smallish flowers , 3- 4 cm , but quite a lot on the spikes ( 2
spikes). A good looking plant , but then I haven't had it very long yet to
spoil the foliage.

Cheers ,

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: The cold weather in south Florida helped some orchids.
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 10:40

Your series of pictures of skinneri cultivars is particularly interesting ;
to my regret , very few are available over here , I guess it is the one(s)
which have been meristemmed , Hetty Jacobs in particular , of which I have a
couple of examples . I also had a Casa Luna , but it was a poor plant and
did not survive the transition across the Atlantic.

When good varieties, not meristemmed, are available ( of any Cattleya) they
come very expensive by the time they are at a UK show on a dealers stand,
and my experience of such plants has not been good. It is painful enough to
lose a plant which has cost £25 , but when the cost is £250 it is more of a
disaster.And somehow or other I hardly ever lose a normal priced plant when
I buy it , but expensive ones are far more problem prone. I wonder why that
should be the case ? The last ( mildy expensive) plant I bought 2 weeks ago
, is already on the compost heap !

As to getting skinneri varieties, perhaps I should look on e-bay more
regularly ; it seems that plants sent from abroad are not stopped by customs
even though they have no accompanying forms, permits, or any of the other
bureaucratic nonsense so beloved of governments but I suppose this only
works if tried with an individual plant. A whole boxful would be more likely
to be stopped.

BTW Jordan, I think our mutual friend Ron Newstead visited you a year or
two ago ? You will be sorry to hear that he is in a nursing home and
unexpected to come out. He is unable to stand, due to some problem with
water on the brain, which is unoperable because of his general health, and
has put on a lot of weight so that it needs two or three nurses to get him
out of bed and back inI telephone him occasionally , and he remains
cheerful, but since he has no contact with the outside world apart from the
tv we can find very little to talk about. He asked me not to mention
orchids , and I gather that the greenhouse and whatever was in it have all
been swept away into a rubbish skip.

Getting old is so sad when this kind of thing happens; I think I would
rather avoid it.

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Aerangis fastuosa and Dendrobium margaretaceum
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 12:45

Hi David

I have been growing D bellatulum cool,high light, mounted and sprayed
daily. This is the 3rd year I've had it and til now it's been fine. Some
of the flower buds have gone yellow and dropped and the new canes don't seem
as vigorous as before. I may move it into the warm (15ºc) and see....

In your picture of D margaritaceum I can see the Aerangis in the background
and I was wondering if you were growing them together. I would have thought
a min of 18ºc would be too high from what I have read. The two species are
very similar but D margaritaceum is found at lower altitudes. It is also
called D cristyanum by some authorities. They apparently need a distinct dry
season.

As for mounts − mine is on a composite cork mount and well attached
otherwise I would move it just because I don't like the look of the
composite. It reminds me of bathroom tiles! If it's not attached it may
have been recently moved − or wild collected?

This is D bellatulum from better days last year.

Andy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchid Genera Abbreviations
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 16:45

For those of us who are befuddled by the taxonomic changes which are
afflicting our hobby or look at a label and realise we have never
heard of the genus mentioned, there is a handy set of files at:

http://www.firstrays.com/genera_abbrev.htm

which are free to download, with the stipulation that they remain
free to all and not offered for sale or incorporated into anything
else offered for sale.

Compiled by Gary Wills of South Carolina they appear to be pretty
comprehensive. There is quite a lot of free information on the First
Rays site.

--

Tricia

Age is a very high price to pay for maturity.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Aerangis fastuosa and Dendrobium margaretaceum
Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2010 20:00

Hello Andy,

I bought D margaritaceum at the London Orchid show so I have only had it for
a couple of weeks. I hung it beside the Aerangis because I was going away
for the Easter weekend and my neighbour comes in to spray my mounted
orchids. I had to arrange them so that they wouldn't drip on other orchids
below. She's a lovely lady but a bit manic with the sprayer.

I have now moved it into the brightest position up high but still in the
warm house. I normally leave that type of plant in the warm all Summer and
transfer it into the cool house with the Cymbidiums for a couple of months
during the Winter. I will look on Google to find the correct conditions. If,
as you say, it grows at lower altitudes it would need a warmer greenhouse.

Your photo of your plant looks very similar to margaritaceum. My plant looks
to have been sliced off a mount and put on that bathroom cork tile, just
wondering what to use instead. I don't have a big enough piece of cork left.
I might try a piece of tree fern.

David

"Andy" wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Aerangis fastuosa and Dendrobium margaretaceum

> Hi David
>
> I have been growing D bellatulum cool,high light, mounted and
> sprayed daily. This is the 3rd year I've had it and til now it's
> been fine. Some of the flower buds have gone yellow and dropped
> and the new canes don't seem as vigorous as before. I may move it
> into the warm (15ºc) and see....
>
> In your picture of D margaritaceum I can see the Aerangis in the
> background and I was wondering if you were growing them together.
> I would have thought a min of 18ºc would be too high from what I
> have read. The two species are very similar but D margaritaceum
> is found at lower altitudes. It is also called D cristyanum by
> some authorities. They apparently need a distinct dry season.
>
> As for mounts − mine is on a composite cork mount and well attached
> otherwise I would move it just because I don't like the look of
> the composite. It reminds me of bathroom tiles! If it's not
> attached it may have been recently moved − or wild collected?
>
> This is D bellatulum from better days last year.

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