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2010 Archived Messages


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Links to all the Photos and other images accompanying the list messages can be found on the Images page.

MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

March 1—7

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 08:30

Hi John ; I followed your procedure − but no luck.

Then I went direct to Help , which told me to do something similar but
starting from Tools/Options/Mail Format/. . but that didn't work, either.

I'll take it up in the WindowsdBBS forum to see if anyone has any ideas.

But thanks anyway.

Geoff

John J. Rupp wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?

Geoff,

I had the same issues with MS Word, and just recently found how to change
these defaults, which were the same as yours.

Press the F1 key to acces Word's help, then enter "default font" in the
search box. The procedure is summarized here.

On the "Home" tab, click on the "Font Dialog Box Launcher" (the tiny, barely
visible icon at the far right of the box saying Font), and then click the
Font tab if it does not come automatically. Select the options that you want
to apply to the default font, such as font style and font size, and color.
Click "Default", and then click "Yes".

This did work for me, and I am much happier. Good Luck

John R

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 09:25

Geoff,

You could always tell Microsoft that a light blue text on white
background as default is a very poor choice − after all, they
apparently listened to all those people on the adverts for Windows 7
:-)

Yeah, right.

--

Tricia

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 09:50

Did you really come up the Clyde on a banana boat last night, Tricia ?

Or another way of putting it , pigs might fly...

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 13:40

Hi Geoff,

This email is Calibri font size 14 which I have re-set as follows:

In Microsoft Outlook Windows 7

click on Tools

Click on options (at bottom of list)

Click on Mail Format

Click on Stationary and fonts

Click on each of the 3 'Font' tabs in turn and choose the font style and
size .

Then click 'OK'

(this click returns you to the window showing the 3 font tabs so you can
repeat the process for the 2nd and 3rd 'Font' tabs.)

Then click 'OK' to close each of the windows.

It seems to have worked for me!

Your ' Phaius Tankerville' is blooming well at this point in time. I say
'your' as I bought it from you a few years ago! Great plant.

Regards from a damp but sunny Lincolnshire!

Tony

Geoffrey Hands wote RE: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?

Hi John ; I followed your procedure − but no luck.

Then I went direct to Help , which told me to do something similar but
starting from Tools/Options/Mail Format/. . but that didn't work, either.

I'll take it up in the WindowsdBBS forum to see if anyone has any ideas.

But thanks anyway.

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 19:20

Thanks Tony − this has almost done the trick − its got me to the right font
and size, but not colour ; I'll have another go.

(What I had been doing was similar but on 'personal stationery' . But with
computers you have to get it dead right ; not just right, but dead right. if
I address your mail to Tony Garthwait − minor mis-spelling which the human
brain would gloss over − the message will bounce. Shows how stupid computers
are.)

Whatever . thanks for all that.

Glad to hear one of my plants pleases. This year, on a division a year or
three ago from my plant , I have had a spike of 10 flowers ( Phaius
tankervilliae) which I don't think I have done before. Of course I broke a
bud off getting it in the car to take to Bournemouth Show , but that's just
an old man being clumsy − ( truth is I always have been too fast for my own
good, as my mum used to say ) − but in any case, someone else had one with
several spikes on compared to my single spike..

A damp Lincolnshire ? When I go out with my walking club in the New Forest
this year , I don't wear boots ; don't wear wellies, don't wear waders − a
diving suit is best.. What a horrible winter − or is this just another
aspect of old age ?

Does anyone know whether I go to Zurich or Basle to ring the door-bell of
Dignitas .?

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2010 19:20

2nd try. As Eliza Doolittle said, 'I think I've got it, I think I've got
it '

I will spare you the rest of the song.

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 2010 17:40

Geoff,

My wife likes Cliff Richard songs.........

"Congratulations and celebrations......" I'll spare you the rest of the
song!!!

Tony G.

P.S. You'll notice I'm still 'Blue'!

Geoffrey Hands RE: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?

> 2nd try. As Eliza Doolittle said, 'I think I've got it, I think I've got
> it '

> I will spare you the rest of the song.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Emailing: 003 (2), 006
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 2010 16:50

This plant has flowered at last. I was given it about a year ago by
Norma who was unable to flower it. They always flower when you give them
away!! It is Sophronitis cernua, or is it now a Cattleya?
David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: 003 (2), 006
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 2010 20:15

Nice one. A cattleya so I believe − but it seems odd to label it thus. Such
is habit.

Why we ever agreed to go along with all this I can't imagine ; very limited
imagination on the part of those ( who were they, by the way ? ) who spoke
up for orchid growers, at that conference they had (?) when Alec Pridgeon -
I believe − laid out the problems arising from the new DNA investigations.

But it has always been recognised that growers and taxonomists pursued
different paths ( I won't do more than mention the too oft repeated tale
of Kew putting one of the only two known plants of Paph delanatii into the
herbarium , in the interests of science ) but completely messing up the
Register with its ( by now I suppose approaching 200,000) registrations of
hybrids , to meet these changes − especially when they often seem
contradictory and are not − never are − final , seems so completely
unnecessary.

Geoff, ( name now changed officially , to "permanently grumpy old man"
).....

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: 003 (2), 006
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 07:25

How about Laelia purpurata which is just a big Cattleya? Now it's in
Sophronitis which were the miniatures.
David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tony Watkinson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Laelia purpurata
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 10:30


To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: The Good Old Days.
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 11:40

Mornin' all,

I would like to think that most of us Members from the U.K. are gradually, but very slowly crawling out of hibernation!!! Coldest Winter for thirty years or so. And I have lost maybe fifteen orchids.

Done hardly any gardening at all. No green shoots on the wild Hawthorn bushes, or no buds bursting on then 'Conker' trees.

So, emerging from hibernation I was very pleased to read what Geoff and David had posted.

> > Nice one. A cattleya so I believe − but it seems odd to label it thus. Such
> > is habit.

> > Why we ever agreed to go along with all this I can't imagine ; very limited
> > imagination on the part of those ( who were they, by the way ? ) who spoke
> > up for orchid growers, at that conference they had (?) when Alec Pridgeon -
> > I believe − laid out the problems arising from the new DNA investigations.

> > But it has always been recognised that growers and taxonomists pursued
> > different paths ( I won't do more than mention the too oft repeated tale
> > of Kew putting one of the only two known plants of Paph delanatii into the
> > herbarium , in the interests of science ) but completely messing up the
> > Register with its ( by now I suppose approaching 200,000) registrations of
> > hybrids , to meet these changes − especially when they often seem
> > contradictory and are not − never are − final , seems so completely
> > unnecessary.

> > Geoff, ( name now changed officially , to "permanently grumpy old man".

> How about Laelia purpurata which is just a big Cattleya? Now it's in
> Sophronitis which were the miniatures.
> David

First of all Geoff.....my kids call me 'Victor Mildew.

To go along with what both of you have said, I must tell you about the fact that I swapped a few E-mails with a couple of people regarding some of our Wild Orchids. Well....one person walked the same path as me, but the other person was walking along the path that Geoff spoke of.....taxonomists etc.

I was told that the orchids that I was speaking about had a double chromosome count _)*(&*&(^$^$"£*^)()(_+ tell that to anyone who is walking along, sitting beside an orchid and enjoying it, looking at it as we should. And then to top it all I was told that the strange hybrid that I had seen [ see attachment ] was a 'Hyperchromic' hybrid. First time I had heard that word in my seventy two years. Enough to frighten off all newcomers to this fantastic hobby. At least the other person who I E-mailed the photos to came up with an instant reply..............It looks like that Japanese orchid... Ponerorchis.

Hypercromic )*(*(&)*(&&^(^%*$ Hyper Extra. Chromic colour. So what, that's what it is....a very nice deep colour, with that strange design. There's many of them in the New Forest/Winchester area.

So Geoff and David, we all know that it should be kept nice and simple.....common sense.....and that we are all able to enjoy what we see without complicating it.

Signing off for now...'Victor Mildew.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Woops!
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 15:20

Apologies to you all,

I did not, or at least, the 'Computer' did not, include the rest of the images of the ......wait for it...'Hyperchromic' wild orchid.

Cheers, Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oncidium/Odontoglossum?
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 15:50

Sorry for the bother Geoff but macular degeneration is a bit of a B
Regards

--- On Mon, 1/3/10, Geoffrey Hands wrote:

> 2nd try. As Eliza Doolittle said, I think I've got it, I think I've got it.
> I will spare you the rest of the song...

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Species or hjybrids.
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 15:55

Hi all,

As I am devoting a great deal of time this year to our Wild Orchids, which includes making out a very detailed Fact Sheet for all those that I find, I would like to discuss with any interested members the so called...Heath Spotted Orchid.

Dactylorhiza maculata, or as it was once known, Orchis ericetorum has a deep rooted interest for me. So let me explain. First of all, it falls in with the other 'Dactyl' orchids. Which are those with a very similar rootstock or tuber. It looks something like a very badly forked parsnip.

So, here in the New Forest area of south west Hampshire I find a great many beautiful, wonderful, mind-boggling hybrids. Why you may ask? Because the New Forest is basically made up of several types of 'soil', gravel/sand/clay/loam etc. it is so much different than the chalk that surrounds it on all sides.

Some of our Wild Orchids love the chalky soil, some hate it and only grow in the New Forest, a good example are the two Butterfly orchids. The Greater Butterfly orchid is found on the chalk, but you won't find the Lesser Butterfly there.......only hidden in the New Forest.

So what am I getting at. Well, the Common Spotted orchid, the Common Marsh orchid, the Early Marsh orchid all grow either in the New Forest or abound it. So it is inevitable that being all 'Dactly' orchids they interbreed like something crazy.

And the offspring also have a fine time flirting around, which anyone can see when they visit the New Forest and come upon an area full of them.

My feelings have always leant to the fact that in a nice colony of so called Heath Spotted orchids that not one of them is identical to another. Hence my collection of images taken last year in an area shall we say just two hundred yards by two hundred yards.

Maybe you might like to tell me what you think?

Cheers, Rodge.

Apologies if they take a little time to download.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Species or hybrids.
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 17:35

Roger said:

"My feelings have always leant to the fact that in a nice colony of
so called Heath Spotted orchids that not one of them is identical to
another. Hence my collection of images taken last year in an area
shall we say just two hundred yards by two hundred yards.

Maybe you might like to tell me what you think?"

Roger, have you thought of putting the wealth of information and
photos you have acquired on to a website? I think a lot of people
would find it very interesting.

By the way, in what 'soil' was the Ponerorchis look-alike from your
other message growing?

Cheers,

--

Tricia

Nothing in the known universe travels faster than a bad cheque.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Species or hybrids.
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 19:00

Hear hear !
Geoff

Tricia Garner Re: [OrchidTalk] Species or hybrids.

> Roger, have you thought of putting the wealth of information and
> photos you have acquired on to a website? I think a lot of people
> would find it very interesting.

> Cheers,

> --

> Tricia

> Nothing in the known universe travels faster than a bad cheque.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Soil and Website.
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 2010 19:00

Hi Tricia and Gordon.

Website...................I've got one...it's name is.....'Orchid Talk'. Or at least that is the Website that I am part of, and If I may say so, a certain young lady does a terrific job with it.

Tricia, the soil that the 'Hyperchromic' hybrid.....what a name to put people off...a hybrid made from I guess the Common Marsh and the early marsh orchid, was growing alongside hundreds of other species and hybrids in a field/meadow that is on the eastern side of Southampton, and it runs almost down to the river near Burlsedon. I would just call it normal type soil as found in many such fields. Would you like some more detail? If so I will bring a sample home with me sometime in maybe June of this year, ha, ha.

It's not a chalk soil. I would say that it was just a normal loam???

Nothing special about it, except that these type of wild orchids seem to like it................and many other soils.

If I said that similar type fields...one near Whiteparish, and one near Bramshaw have similar colonies, I am sure you will know of the type of soil that I try to describe.

Just been speaking to a mate of mine about Bog Orchids and he said that last year one bog/wet area at Stoney Cross had about a hundred and fifty plants in it.

Cheers, Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2010 08:20

I used to go on botanical holidays in the Greek islands − wonderful
flowers in May/June. I think the one I have in mind for this note is Crete -
and in one wood, two different soils alternated − so that as you walked
through this wood, first you were walking on the reddish soil, and then on
the blackish one. One was called the testarossa as I remember. The point
is that the flora changed from one soil to the other − you could tell which
you were on by looking at the flowers. As I recall it, we found 27 different
species of orchid − lets not argue about whether they all were different or
hybrids or whatever, and I haven't got any notebook or record left anyway -
lets just say 27 different sorts − all growing on the testarossa, none on
the other soil.

Was it Professor Joad, in the Brains Trust programme on BBC , not more than
a hundred years ago, who used to say "the answer lies in the soil" ?

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2010 09:35

Mornin' Geoff,

And what a glorious morning it is, although the air is so cold.

We gardeners still use that lovely saying.....The answer lies in the soil.

And yes, if people paid more attention to it, they would find some answers quite easy to come by when looking at certain orchids and wondering if it was or that.

Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2010 13:40

Just thought I would stick my oar in.
Maybe the orchids don't mind the different soil types but possibly the symbiotic mycorrhiza don't like certain soils, therefore the orchids don't thrive.
David

Geoffrey Hands wrote RE: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.

> I used to go on botanical holidays in the Greek islands -
> wonderful flowers in May/June. I think the one I have in mind for
> this note is Crete − and in one wood, two different soils
> alternated − so that as you walked through this wood, first you
> were walking on the reddish soil, and then on the blackish one.
> One was called the testarossa as I remember. The point is that the
> flora changed from one soil to the other − you could tell which you
> were on by looking at the flowers. As I recall it, we found 27
> different species of orchid − lets not argue about whether they all
> were different or hybrids or whatever, and I haven't got any
> notebook or record left anyway − lets just say 27 different sorts
> − all growing on the testarossa, none on the other soil.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2010 18:20

Or of course the seed never germinates there. yes, maybe that is it. But of
course the soil pH would be different too.

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Soil
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2010 19:00

Maybe it is my age bit I thought that it was Percy Thrower That got his answers from the SOIL.
Regards

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 2010 19:20

Hi David,

A good valid point, but although I try to steer away from the technical points when I talk to people about our Wild Orchids, I, like you, know a thing or two about the fungi. To make matters worse,.....I know of at least one area where the following orchids grow: Bee/Common Marsh/Early Marsh/Bog/Heath Spotted/Lesser Butterfly/Helleborine.

It would be nice to know how many different fungi there are in a certain area.

Cheers, Rodge.

David Martin wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.

> Just thought I would stick my oar in. Maybe the orchids don't
> mind the different soil types but possibly the symbiotic
> mycorrhiza don't like certain soils, therefore the orchids don't
> thrive.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2010 09:25

Mornin' Geoff,

I must admit that I am totally confused by your first few words.....Or of course the seed never germinates there.

Can you tell us what you mean by that please Geoff.....I am thinking on the lines that seed which is distributed by being wind blown just falls to the ground and then the process just starts. Same as for as for all other seed, except of course the orchid seed needs the fungi.

Rodge.

Geoffrey Hands wrote RE: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.

> Or of course the seed never germinates there. yes, maybe that is
> it. But of course the soil pH would be different too.

David Martin wrote Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.

> > Just thought I would stick my oar in.

> > Maybe the orchids don't mind the different soil types but
> > possibly the symbiotic mycorrhiza don't like certain soils,
> > therefore the orchids don't thrive.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2010 15:30

Rodge said..

"It would be nice to know how many different fungi there are in a certain
area."

Answer , not above say 10,000..

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2010 19:30

Hi Geoff,

That is more than just a fair few, but as Mother Nature shows us.....some plants will grow in one type of soil, whereas they will not grow in another type of soil. That's where I will rest my case. All very interesting and wonderful.

Just looked at a Website of a Certain 'Nursery'. Wrong name applied to a certain orchid. They ought to know better !!!

And another Wild Orchid supplier....................Green Veined Orchid and others at £22 or more.

I will have to keep my eyes open and carry my walking stick with me......not that I need it, but it is a good weapon.

Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.
Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2010 20:20

Without permission − but I'm sure they (David Miller, Dick Warren et al )'d
give it if asked, let me quote from "The Organ Mountain Range, it's history
and it's orchids". ( I can't recommend this book too highly , for anyone
with a real interest in orchid science)

Mycorrhiza.One of us (RW) worked many years ago on the fungi living on plant
surfaces. among the cultures of fungi isolated were many weird and wonderful
cultures − still waiting to be named. the density of fungi, about 40 million
/ sq cm, is a clue.Certainly, our own observations about seed (orchid seed)
germination in nature would confirm that germination is high and the high
attrition rate occurs well after germination.

No typo there on my part − 40 million examples of fungi per sq. cm.
Naturally, the number of different species is very high too.

So in answer Roger, how many different fungi in a given area ? Whether you
mean separate examples of fungi, or separate species, the answer is
enormous. And moreover something we know so little about.

Years ago at a botanical conference somewhere, I met a guy who was an expert
on micro fungal organisms − he told me that he was always called in when
anyone wanted to know anything about them − because he was the only guy in
the whole of UK who specialised in them..and sometimes he didn't know the
answer anyway.

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands [mailto:geoff.hands@talktalk.net]
Sent: 06 March 2010 15:33
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: RE: [OrchidTalk] Soil and Website.

Rodge said..

It would be nice to know how many different fungi there are in a certain
area.

Answer , not above say 10,000..

Geoff.

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