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2008 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-29
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

June 15—21

From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Peterborough
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

Hi Brenda,
We probably passed each other yesterday, but your email arrived after I
had left for the show!
It (the show) certainly lived up to expectations and my wife did not put
too much of a brake on my wallet! What an amazing variety of plants and
flowers! And a beautiful day for the show too!
I noticed your 'Fenland' display along with the others. I suspect I am
one of the few members of this group who is not a member of an orchid
society. It is such a long way to travel to the nearest group from North
East Lincolnshire. However, it is always useful talking to the members
manning the stands and getting advice at these shows.
Hope you enjoyed your visit. Maybe we'll meet up next year!

Regards,
Tony G ........off to unpack the new specimens!!!!

"Brenda Beale" wrote:

> Hello Tony
>
> I will be going on Saturday, look out for a small lady wearing
> glasses with an emerald green Fenland Orchid Society badge,I might
> be wearing a pink jacket. It would be nice to meet up with some of
> the group.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: This and That.
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

Mornin' all,

Pleased to hear that the Peterborough Show went down very well.

Loved Tony's comment..........It (the show) certainly lived up to expectations and my wife did not put
too much of a brake on my wallet!

And then what Francis had to say about the 'Pickled Onions'..........Got two lepanthes in flower which I have already tuffed into two air tight
pots of pickled onions (I saw this method suggested for really small lepant hes in a website, so I am gonna give it a go).

What the hell is all that about Francis, I am totally amazed, so please tell us more, burp, burp, [could not resist that].

Going back to Paul's 'Ornamental Park' in South Dakota, and he sure does grow some excellent orchids, I had a look at the Latitude readings for his area. He lives about 43 Degrees North, same as Marseille in France. It just goes to prove that we Orchid Hobbyists have some very strange and diverse climates to battle with.

Cheers, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Different climates.
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

Hi Paul,

When I saw your mention of the Catalpa tree I thought..........Catalpa bigninioides. My friend has one growing in his garden next to me. The Indian bean Tree sure is a beauty.

So the Humming Bird has already passed through, hell, if only !!!

And as my friends in Barbados say.....wish we could grow Odontoglussums.

Different climates, yes, but then if we were all the same...................

Thanks Paul, regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Brenda Beale
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Peterborough
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

It sounds as though the group members that went to Peterborough enjoyed the
show, I certainly did. I was very impressed at the number of specimen plants
there were on the stands, truly magnificent. I also dug my hand into my
purse several times, and as I went round for the third time I had to curb my
spending. Sorry I missed you Tony as you say I expect we passed each other.

Regards Brenda

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] This and That.
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

Rocky,

What I was talking about is Lepanthes culture. Searching the web a while ago, I found that some Lepanthes, like it intermediate to warm, yet very humid. It was suggested in this website to get your lepanthes, a wad of moss and get everything in an air tight container (i.e. a jam jar or any other jar that you can close). I had saved this two jars that close with one of those tight seals that have a rubber band on it, and don't let air in or out. The idea is that the moisture of the moss should keep the inside of the jar very humid, and the Lepanthes should just love it there. You only need to water occasionally, as the moisture does eventually escape when you open the jars to let fresh air in every now and then.

If I have time during the next week, I shall take some photos of the jars to show you all.

Francis
>
> And then what Francis had to say about the 'Pickled
> Onions'..........Got two lepanthes in flower which I
> have already tuffed into two air tight
> pots of pickled onions (I saw this method suggested for
> really small lepant hes in a website, so I am gonna give it
> a go).
>
> What the hell is all that about Francis, I am totally
> amazed, so please tell us more, burp, burp, [could not
> resist that].

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] B.Lynchmere
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

I think the only way you will find Jack K ings Biffrenaria hybrids is through the Wessex Orchid Soc. where Jack was a member for many years. Regards Dennis

Brenda Beale wrote:

> Thanks for the info. Dennis, just going to look on my Orchidwiz to
> to sse what Bifs. made it.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Different climates.
Date: Sun, 15 Jun 2008

Hey Roger,

Ours is Catalpa speciosa. The Southern Catalpa is C. bignonioides;
they are very similar. A good choice for the introduction to Britain
in the early days; dumb choice to take the gray squirrel, however!

Curious. Something is amiss with a timekeeper somewhere. Your
message has the time stamp of 11:11:26 A.M. for tomorrow!

I will try to remember to get some pic's of the hummer's when they
come back next month. After raising their chicks up north, they spend
the rest of summer slowly working their way south again. Last summer
we had upwards of 6 birds hanging around for almost two months.

cheers,

Paul

On Jun 15, 2008, at 11:11 AM, Roger Grier wrote:

> Hi Paul,
>
> When I saw your mention of the Catalpa tree I
> thought..........Catalpa bigninioides. My friend has one growing in
> his garden next to me. The Indian bean Tree sure is a beauty.
>
> So the Humming Bird has already passed through, hell, if only !!!

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Wed, 03 Oct 2001 10:10

I am interested in these references to 'moss poles'. Many orchids benefit from contact with or closeness to a pole of damp moss. However, in my experience, many (if not all) of these poles are simply a plastic tube with a thin mat of moss wired around it and no matter how thoroughly soaked, they dry out very quickly and don't seem to have sufficient capillarity to maintain dampness from a source in which they might be stood or connected.

I suppose we could drill-perforate the plastic tube with many holes (thought that up as I type this) and fill it internally with a moisture-holding medium as well as the outer covering of moss. Has anyone any ideas?

I suspect the flower arrangers are more interested in short term aesthetic arrangements rather that long term survival and the rigidity of the plastic core may be more important to them than to us.

John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: a few piccys
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008

And a few comments:-

B.lobbii is a very variable orchid. I have heard some experts ( taxonomic
botanists ) refer to it as the 'Bulbophyllum lobbii group' . Maybe , as they
used to say of our common blackberry, here in UK , when I went to Botanical
Soc. Meetings many years ago , 'a hybrid swarm'.

My plant in a 12inch (?) pan now , growing everywhere , although not outside
the pan yet ! has some 15 or so buds and flowers this year.

I once saw a plant with 6 flowers which got a CCC/RHS , but it's is not
worth the journey to 'Lunnon' , with all the hassle and expense that
entails, just for a bit of paper telling me it's well grown.

Dendrobium hercoglossum , when I looked at the label I happened to see the
back, with the price tag on , 25 somethings , could have been Euros , still
that's not far off £25 the way things are going , but worth every penny.
Delightful scent- and since I first showed it to you a month (?) ago , and
the first flowers are only just going off as you can see, a good buy in my
opinion.

D. sulawesii. What a super colour this one is. Big flowers too , something
like 2 inch across, and if you see them sideways , they are rather like a
pixie hat , the same kind of size there too. I have a couple of others, much
paler. I'm delighted with this one. It produces flowers in twos and threes
from some nodes , its never a nobile ( covered with flowers) but since they
make such a good display, that's not too important. ( The plant does have
other flowers, but I can't get them in the same picture and show you how
lovely they are at one and the same time.

The BLC is surely named , but my Wildcatt is on the blink, and I'm in
correspondence about a new version. In the meantime if Dennis or anyone else
can name it, please let me know.

The same applies to the Paph , in fact I'm sure I have other plants with the
same flower and with the hybrid name on , but not out at present.

As they always tell me in expensive restaurants, 'enjoy' − and an hour or
two later they take my credit card and rather spoil the enjoyment , I can't
do that to you my friends... ( it's only a joke you know ! ).

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Rocky mainly
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008

Here are some pics of D. fuchsii in Wales. The first shows the different
colours, from near white to purple in one clump, the second I hope one can
see the clump on the edge of a low sandy cliff. Next winter it will
probably be washed away, the other two show fuchsii growing about 6 feet
from he High Water Mark in almost pure sand! Surprising how they can do it.

Regards
Alex Scott

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: [OrchidTalk] Dactylorhiza Fuchsii, Common Spotted orchid.
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008

Hi Alex, and thanks for the photos.

To be quite honest, when I first saw the photos it took my memory back
to an almost identical sandy cliff at Rock, opposite Padstow in
Cornwall.

It just goes to show what differing soils this rascal will grow in.

Possibly this weekend, weather permitting, I may get some good shots of
Common Spotted in the New Forest.

Cheers for now, Rodge.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Emailing: First bloom.jpg
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008

Hi all,

You may remember me telling of a plant that was given to me some time ago, and that the sheath took ages to fatten up, and the buds, all four of them did eventually burst out of the top. This is the longest that I have ever known for buds to develop and open.

WELL, NOT QUITE..........after all that time the four buds did in fact stand clear of the top of the sheath, but I expected them to stand upright..........nothing doing..........they hung downwards, and for a while I thought that they might break off.

Then I could see that all four buds were quite 'sticky', and eventually I had to prise the three sepals away from the other flower parts. But before I did that I was quite certain that two of the buds were not going to make it. So I cut them off. That left two.

I knew that something was amiss with one of them, and on a closer inspection..........it had no lip???!!!

However, the photo of the remaining flower is quite nice.

As soon as it has finished flowering I will depot, clean and repot it.

It is quite a large 'Cattleya' type plant, single large leaf.

BUT, IT HAS NO LABEL......................AND IDEA OF A NAME PLEASE.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: ophrys insectifera or is it orchis
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008

Hello all,two days ago i finally got my permit to go on to a hants and isle of wight nature conservation site at old burghclere near newbury,i had been waiting a week and drumming my fingers alot as the fly orchids i was going to see would be gone over soon;luckily i caught them in time.What really surprised me was the only other orchids on site were twayblade and common spotted orchid. If you get permission it is a great site to spend a day at; pristene and quiet. Hear are some piccy's for your viewing pleasure, if you look hard you can see the eyes and antennae of the fly.
p.s.if you want to see them get moving as there is only about a week left!
Happy growing! Gavin

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Gordon Walker
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: European terrestrial orchids
Date: Thu, 19 Jun 2008

To any one interested in terrestrial orchids.
Google Gardens at Post Hill and click on Gunther Blaich.
Some fabulous pictures.
Gordon.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: cymbidiums and "flower boosting fertilizer"
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2008

Good evening Orchid experts of the world,

This is a question more about fertilizer than cymbs, but here goes.... We here in the tropics like cymbidiums, but we move them around to et them to flower, i.e. we take them up in the mountains in the fall so they can get a larger change in Temp so they will flower. With that thought in mind when to start using "blossom booster" Fertilizer ( i.e. lower Nitrogen formulas...) ?..... to further confuse and complicate the question( or my life) I use and really like osmocote ( slow release fertilizer) I have recently switched to a 9 month version, from the 3 month version, but it is a 14-14-14 flavor so it will undoubtedly be fighting my "blossom booster" fert. So now you know the problems of my life ;-)

Any Ideas suggetions?

Pura Vida to all those great responders!

Jim

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Gavin'sOrchid Safari to Old Burghclere Lime Pit.
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2008

Mornin' Gavin,

Glad you liked that visit as it sure is a nice place. I was rather surprised to hear that you said that the ONLY OTHER ORCHIDS on the site were, Twayblade and Common Spotted.....bloody hell mate what more do you want, ha, ha.

So you did not see the Common White Helleborine then ??? Admittedly they would have gone over, but there are some beauties there. And I am thinking that some Fragrant Orchids are there, or is it Pyramidal???

Fly Orchid/Ophrys Insectifera. By the way, as there are so many Fly Orchids there, it is a superb place to look at their leaves to show for certain that they do not grow in the Autumn and stand all through the Winter, but come up through the soil in the Spring. As far as I am aware, the Fly Orchid is the only member of the Ophrys Genus in the U.K. to do this. We must investigate, and include our mutual friend Dick [Richard] Laurence to be ABSOLUTELY SURE about this fact.

I'm off out this morning to look for the Isle of Wight Helleborine and will keep you all posted.

Cheers for now, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: First bloom.jpg
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2008

Rocky,

I have a few laelia purpurta x chia lin that look very similar.

Jim

--- On Thu, 6/19/08, Roger Grier wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> You may remember me telling of a plant that was given to me some
> time ago, and that the sheath took ages to fatten up, and the buds,
> all four of them did eventually burst out of the top. This is the
> longest that I have ever known for buds to develop and open.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: WOC 19 in Miami
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2008

I finally finished the editing of the pictures that I took at the WOC.
I have 6 WOC movie clips on You Tube. The last clips were posted
yesterday. If you go to my site you will open with a large picture, if
you go to You Tube the picture will be smaller.

The best is: www.togofcoralgables.com Then go to Movie Clips.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Most interesting.
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2008

Hello Gordon,

After a while I did get on to the correct web site..........WOW. Now that sure is an extremely interesting website and one that I have added to my 'FAVOURITES'.

That Gunther Blaich sure has some information and photos.

I will have to get myself another beer and have a damned good look at it. WOW again.

I see that 'Hardy Orchids' advertise on it and I recognise the polytunnel.........must not say too much, but I do have to give Claudia and Nik a call in the morning.

Ah that's better.....another beer. I do deserve it as this morning I was creeping around a rather dark and dense wood of mixed trees just a few yards from the River Test looking for certain orchids.

Found a couple of Twayblades well past their best, but nice to see that they still grow there. Then a few Common Spotted Orchids. Only one in flower, due I think to the darkness of the wood. I had seen this before when I found a group of Greater Butterfly Orchids in a Beech wood plantation. In the plantation of Beech trees, there was a clump of blackthorn, and they just kept out the light, inasmuch that the Greater Butterfly grew huge leaves but did not flower.

Back to this mornings Orchid Safari.

What I was most hoping to find were some plants [still in bud] of the Isle of Wight Helleborine [Epipactis Vectensis], not to be confused with the Pendulous-flowered Helleborine. I have seen both and they are different.

I was very pleased to find one group of about eight plants in a space six foot by six foot. These I am fairly sure will turn out to be what I was looking for.

Then I made my way to the dark wood................hell !!!!! Many. many Helleborines, but what a mind boggling assortment. All still in the bud stage and earlier, so plenty to look forward to.

I will take some photos of the locality for you in the next few days or so.

Needless to say, this location offers much to the Wild Orchid buff, but it will also throw up many headaches.........or is it the beer, ha, ha.

A good mornings work and very rewarding.

Cheers all, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alan Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: dendrobium muricatum
Date: Fri, 20 Jun 2008

Hi!
Can anybody give me cultural instructions for the above dendrobium? I
understand that it has been reclassified as inobulbon muricatum which is a
sub-species of dendrobium with only three members. Searches of the www net
reveal references but I can find no useful details to help me grow the
plant properly. Books ,again, make reference but no detail! Help!

Alan Garner

--

Boss

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Most interesting.
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

I have a problem with my email getting through and not into the spam.
A week ago I replied to an email, others had, but my picture of C.
dowiana 'rosita' was left in the spam. Then last night I started a new
thread and it went into the spam. I wanted to invite you all to see my
three newest movie clips about the WOC 19 in Miami.
You will find it at: www.togofcoralgables.com
Then go to the movie 'movie clips'

Now I will open a new thread and send the C. dowiana 'rosita'

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: C. dowiana 'rosita'
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

C. dowiana 'rosita'
http://bp2.blogger.com/_UwGkeJ84ueM/SFgFPyfVumI/AAAAAAAABUs/immuk4bnxHk/s1600-h/C.+dow.jpg

Now you have 3 ways to see the picture if this gets through.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

I just got this email on June 20 08 9:20PM and john sent it Wednesday, October 3, 2001, 5:14 AM
There is a problem some place.

--- On Wed, 10/3/01, John W Stanley wrote:

> I am interested in these references to 'moss poles'.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Nathaniel Green
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Hi,

I have been trying to find an article on another forum which a member walked
through how they built their own moss poles. I can not find it but the basic
construction was; plastic coated wire like a fence mesh wrapped round into
the diameter that is required, using plastic rip cords to secure the two
ends together, and secure one end with rip cords so now you have a cylinder
with a closed end. One the out side coconut matting was wrapped round
covering the whole cylinder, inside was placed your choice of absorbent
material in this case was bark, then when the cylinder was full, the open
end was secured with rip cords and coconut fibre wrapped and secure round (I
believe with wire) and the end result was a pole structure with coconut
fibre exterior and an absorbent centre.

I hope this make sense to people, if not, I will try some rudimentary
drawings not guaranteeing these will explain any future!! :-)

Nat

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Nathaniel Green
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] dendrobium muricatum
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Hi Alan,

Not sure if this is the same plant but Jay pfahl has used dendrobium
muricatum as a synonym, Sorry if it is no good or you have already tried it.

http://www.orchidspecies.com/inomunificum.htm

Nat

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

On 21 Jun, in article ,
jns tropic wrote:

> I just got this email on June 20 08 9:20PM and john sent it
> Wednesday, October 3, 2001, 5:14 AM There is a problem some place.

[Snip]

I think John's computer is confused − if you look at the headers of
his email you can see it was actually sent on Friday 20 June 2008
spite of claiming the message date to be Wednesday October 3 2001.

This kind of thing sometimes indicates that the computer's internal
battery which keeps the clock going is on its way out, or it could be
a program which has re-set the clock to the wrong date and time.

--

Tricia

If all the world is a stage, where is the audience sitting?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

I have done just that − drilled holes, and filled with coarse Perlite, then
stood the pole in a basin of water. It didn't work , i.e. yhe top of the
pole remained dry − I can't remember how far up it did stay wet , but not
enough for me to proceed.

Capillarity has its limits − I have never been able to find any hard science
about capillarity to know where they are ( I suspect , from Patent work I
did on fractionating and distillation columns many years ago, that the
answers lie in very fine points hard to quantify , such as the percentage
area of each particle in touch with others, and hence the available area for
capillary flow, plus electroconductivity of the surface vis-a-vis the EC of
the "water" which will affect the actual capillary spread "speed" − to coin
a phrase ).

One of my orchid growing friends at the time − a very practical chap (
gardener in charge of a small estate of a few acres, home to an
industrialist ) − laughed at my experiments and told me how to solve the
matter very simply . He put his pole beneath a tap which he left turned on,
dribbling water.... but there were no water meters in those days, and he
didn't pay the bills anyway, for his tied cottage.

Nice to hear from you again John , and nice to have some List messages which
are entirely on subject − growing orchids, as distinct from a dozen messages
a day talking about wild flowers in the English countryside !

Geoff

John W Stanley wrote:

> I am interested in these references to 'moss poles'. Many orchids benefit
> from contact with or closeness to a pole of damp moss. However, in my
> experience, many (if not all) of these poles are simply a plastic tube with
> a thin mat of moss wired around it and no matter how thoroughly soaked, they
> dry out very quickly and don't seem to have sufficient capillarity to
> maintain dampness from a source in which they might be stood or connected.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] dendrobium muricatum
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

The species is found in New Caledonia − an island in the South Pacific ,off
the coast of Australia, rather north of Brisbane − perhaps the same
latitude as the Whitsun Islands. I've been to the Whitsun Islands ( but not
New Caledonia) − quite tropical − coral reefs, all that sort of thing.
D.muricatum is said to come from altitudes of 300-1000 m − quite high. That
will lower temperatures quite a bit − my experience suggests at least 1 deg.
C for each 100m − so that will add up to making it a cool-intermediate
orchid.
Lavarock, Harris & Stocker suggest a bit warmer than that, and say all year
round watering.
Hope this helps.

geoff

Alan Garner wrote:

> Hi!
> Can anybody give me cultural instructions for the above dendrobium?
> [muricatum] I understand that it has been reclassified as inobulbon
> muricatum which is a sub-species of dendrobium with only three
> members. Searches of the www net reveal references but I can find
> no useful details to help me grow the plant properly. Books ,again,
> make reference but no detail! Help!

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

I think there is a problem in the way John's message got dated. I don't
think it has been in Cyberspace for 7 years − it would have got a bit curled
up at the edges if it was that old ! At some point in digital encoding a
few dots got misplaced that's all. We are so used to thinking these
machines are infallible, but it's not really so.

geoff

jns tropic wrote:

> I just got this email on June 20 08 9:20PM and john sent it Wednesday,
> October 3, 2001, 5:14 AM
> There is a problem some place.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

It sounds so complicated that I wonder why anyone wants to bother. There are
easier ways to grow orchids !

Geoff

Nathaniel Green wrote:

> Hi,

> I have been trying to find an article on another forum which a member walked
> through how they built their own moss poles.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

I expect you will remember when software vendors issued programmes which
were free for say 1 month, then you had to pay for them, and the trick was
to reset the computer clock every week, so that the programme thought the
original month was still running and you never had to pay.
Not that I ever tried it !
But they are more sophisticated now, and the programme time signature would
get reset with the clock so it wouldn't work.
But yes, I think you are right in putting the blame on John − he has broad
shoulders anyway.( I always used to blame John Prescott for everything − bad
weather, my horse in the Derby coming in last − everything − but since he
has retired, it's not the same.)

Geoff

Tricia Garner wrote:

> I think John's computer is confused − if you look at the headers of
> his email you can see it was actually sent on Friday 20 June 2008
> spite of claiming the message date to be Wednesday October 3 2001.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] C. dowiana 'rosita'
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Hi, I have seen this picture recently, so presumably it got through OK. I delete emails quickly so that I don't get too many in my Inbox, but it was certainly within the last week. David

jns tropic wrote:

> C. dowiana 'rosita'
http://bp2.blogger.com/_UwGkeJ84ueM/SFgFPyfVumI/AAAAAAAABUs/immuk4bnxHk/s1600-h/C.+dow.jpg

> Now you have 3 ways to see the picture if this gets through.

subject. ----------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] dendrobium muricatum
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Hello Alan,
Dendrobium muricatum comes from New Caledonia so it would need a warm
greenhouse, moist, with tropical conditions as a basic starting point.
Try looking in the Wisley book shop at their Dendrobium books, there's a
good one, costs about £75, too expensive to buy for one plant!!
David

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From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] computer time keeping
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Tricia et al.,

On a lark, I queried one of the computer techies at the university
about this time and date stamp business on e-mails. His basic
statement was that most times and dates given on e-mails are those
generated by the servers through which a particular message passes. I
inquired because I have noticed a tremendous diversity of time stamps
and that many messages from Britain and mainland Europe are received
with time and dates indicating that they were sent 16-18 hours after
they were received. That is, they were sent the day after; e.g., I
get a message from Roger Grier on Sunday afternoon, my time, but the
time and date stamp show that Roger sent it on Monday morning! The
grand confusion comes in that the stamps may not be attached to the
message by the originating computer, or the first server, and will
depend upon which component of a messages passes through which other
servers, and, to top it off, in which direction around the globe from
GMT the packet passes. Thus, when Roger sends me a message on Sunday,
and the critical element of the packet goes eastward on the Internet,
it may become stamped in the future. Maybe someone on this list with
more techiness can provide details.

To see more information, i.e. computer gibberish, about a particular
message, on a Mac first open the message the go to VIEW, then MESSAGE,
then either DEFAULT HEADER or RAW SOURCE. On a Windows computer go
to VIEW, then HEADERS, then ALL.

BTW, just a little bias here. Anyone experiencing problems with
MicroSoft browsers or e-mail programs is recommended to Mozilla's
Firefox browser and Thunderbird e-mail programs. Both are easier to
use, faster, more reliable, handle attachments more reliably, much
more secure in countries with pathetic security paranoid politicians
and bureaucrats (e.g., the USA), and are free! I use them on all my
computers, both Mac's and Windows-based. Oh, one more thing, for
anyone needing FTP capabilities, Firefox now has an add-in program
called Fire FTP, also free, and works like a charm.

Okay, back to orchids. . .

cheers,

Paul

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Moss poles
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Hello all,
I have made moss poles in the past. Buy stiff plastic netting from a garden centre. It's normally on rolls beside the bubble plastic. Use plastic coffee jar lids to form the ends, wrap the spagnum moss around the tube with transparent nylon thread, and fill the centre with your own choice of compost. Rocky could use seramis and brickbats!! For very wet poles fill the centre with water absorbent rock wool. You could also put more coffee lids at spaced intervals up the pole, cup side up, to hold small reservoirs of water. Dunk the whole pole and plant to fill the cups. Don't forget that bark will rot in a couple of years making it very difficult to remove it from the roots down the centre, so it's better to use an inert filling like rock wool, sponge rock, perlite, perlag, Dyna Rok, Rocky's stone mix or a combination to suit your plants.
David.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid (what day is it?)
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Hi Geoff,
I have been using an antique computer for emails because I am becoming buried in spam (yummy yummy in these days of food costs eh?). The real down-side of this machine is that, even with a new battery, it has peculiar ideas about what day it is (maybe it should be defined as senile and admitted to an appropriate institution with a full-time carer).

The upside is that, clearly, I must seem to be some seven years younger than I thought!

Before sending this essay off, I will re-set this machine's perception of date (but I'll guess the time) Let me know if I've moved too far into the future − I'd rather live in the past.

Anyway, it feels like October up 'ere in Crewe.
Hope you are both OK down there in 2008.
Beam me up Scotty
Best wishes
John

geoff hands wrote:

> I think there is a problem in the way John's message got dated. I
> don't think it has been in Cyberspace for 7 years − it would have
> got a bit curled up at the edges if it was that old ! At some
> point in digital encoding a few dots got misplaced that's all. We
> are so used to thinking these machines are infallible, but it's not
> really so.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Geoff, I'm smaller the John Prescott and no use at boxing. Oh, and my
accent is Lancisha (or Manchista) and not Yorksher.

As for using the computer clock for software fiddles − if I set it
ten years forward could I use software nobody's yet written?

As for remembering . . I remember nothin. John

"geoff hands" wrote:

>I expect you will remember when software vendors issued programmes
> which were free for say 1 month, then you had to pay for them, and
> the trick was to reset the computer clock every week, so that the
> programme thought the original month was still running and you
> never had to pay. Not that I ever tried it ! But they are more
> sophisticated now, and the programme time signature would get reset
> with the clock so it wouldn't work. But yes, I think you are right
> in putting the blame on John − he has broad shoulders anyway.( I
> always used to blame John Prescott for everything − bad weather, my
> horse in the Derby coming in last − everything − but since he has
> retired, it's not the same.)

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] computer time keeping
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

That's fine Geoff, but you need an 'elluva long flight to lose seven years!
Cheers
John

"geoff hands" wrote:

>I love this − receiving messages in the past , coming from the
>future...
>
> That book − was it called "a short history of time" or something
> like that ? by that incredibly clever man who lives in a
> wheelchair and speaks through a speech-synthesizer − Stephen
> Hawking (?) . He explains very clearly how time travel is possible
> − theoretically -although he doesn't know how to actually do it.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From:
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Moss poles
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

ideal for the middle to hold water is green oasis,i use it quite a lot on
mounted orchids as a means of providing humidity longer,if you buy blocks you
can just push it down the tube all the way

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alan Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: dendrobium muricatum
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Hi!
Thanks chaps. I'm not sure that I am much further ahead but at least it
gives me something to work on.

--

Boss

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: N & T Burgess
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Dendrobium muricatum
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Allan
Attached are cultural instructions from a book called Dendrobium and its relatives by Bill Lavarak, Wayne Harris & Geoff Stocker − not nearly as expensive as Davids £25 or less − it will need to be enlarged.

Norma

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] computer time keeping
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

I love this − receiving messages in the past , coming from the future...

That book − was it called "a short history of time" or something like that ?
by that incredibly clever man who lives in a wheelchair and speaks through a
speech-synthesizer − Stephen Hawking (?) . He explains very clearly how time
travel is possible − theoretically -although he doesn't know how to actually
do it.

But I once flew the Pacific − LA to Tokyo non-stop − and lost a whole day ;
with a 15 hour flight I went straight from Monday to Wednesday.
And then, another year I made it up on a cruise ship going from Sydney to
Acapulco ( took several weeks − can't remember if it was 5 weeks or whether
that was the whole holiday including time spent in Sydney and Hong Kong).
But whatever − we had two successive days both called 28th march....

In short , crossing the dateline eastwards you get 2 same days, going
westwards, you miss a day.

I can see that e-mails may get the same kind of treatment.

geoff

Paul Johnson wrote:

Tricia et al.,

> On a lark, I queried one of the computer techies at the university
> about this time and date stamp business on e-mails. His basic
> statement was that most times and dates given on e-mails are those
> generated by the servers through which a particular message passes. I
> inquired because I have noticed a tremendous diversity of time stamps
> and that many messages from Britain and mainland Europe are received
> with time and dates indicating that they were sent 16-18 hours after
> they were received.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] moss poles − hollow and/or solid (what day is it?)
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2008

Ah, another Stanhopea fan! Most of my orchid acquaintances can't stand the
strong scent but I think it's great. Or at least, I did when I had a sense
of smell! I lost mine during a course of antibiotics last year and so it is
another part of memory . . some of which I haven't yet lost!

Incidentally, talking of scent and flowers; I was once told by the late Alan
Gemmel (best known on our Gardners' question Time programme) that Mimulus
lost its scent sometime in the ?50s. I've never been able to confirm his
story but I remember (sic !) that as a youngster in the mid forties, I used
to play with my wheel-less (war time) motor cars amongst the garden variety
known as Monkey Musk. True to the story, the 'Monkey' flower is no longer
called 'musk' and was without scent even before I lost smell. Can you with
your infinite botanical experience, add anything to the yarn?
John

Incientally (again) we have a few S.tigrinas, a wardii and ocellata
(ocellus).

Theyre lovely to watch opening. A pity they're so short lasting in bloom.
Cheers
John

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