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2008 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-29
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

June 1—7

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Wild orchids.
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

On 31 May, in article

geoff hands wrote:
> The word is also used in the north of England − which was once
> Viking Country.... the men on the weather forecast speall it harr.

Erm... I think they spell it haar, Scandinavian style.

--

Tricia

By the time you can make ends meet, they move the ends.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catts
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Thanks Roger. I actually do have several of them in alpine grit and a mixture of dynarock and now they are in the house they are doing well! It's something to do with the atmosphere in the greenhouse I feel. They all start to get black patches so I think it's a too low temp together with the level of humidity. Something of a mystery but the other things I mentioned are doing so well I think I've more or less settle on keeping a few catts in the house and using the greenhouse space for things that do well there. − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: photos
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

These are wonderful photographs Gavin. They really cheered me up on a disappointingly cloudy day. You must be really pleased with them. I know I would − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catts and others
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

My computer is very sick. It is with the consultant who will examine it next teusday. I am using someone else's machine and have caught part of the discussion on Cattleya. I have also had a problem with my Cattleya, Coelogyne and Odontoglossum allaince (kept in two green houses)
I eventually discovered that for one night we lost power for 6 hours-midnight till 6 am. As all was running at 9 am and the temp. had dropped to 4C. It was not untill the plants started rotting that I realised I had a problem.
They all seem to be recovering other than Coel. xyrekes.
Regards Dennis

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Fog (was Wild orchids)
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Well, maybe they spell it harr if they have ten thumbs, as I often do when
at my keyboard ?

BTW I'm back home again after my travails in the far frozen north − which
actually was quite sunny and warm − I even saw one of these miserable
runt-like English native orchids ( in Co.Durham, not in Scotland − or it
would have been miserable runt-like Scottish native orchid ) which Roger and
others rave about . Can't think why , they are no more attractive to me than
any other English native wild flower − less so, since I have to lie on the
ground with a magnifying glass in order to be sure that it is a flower, and
not a flung toffee paper . What I also saw which did get me excited , was
some of the pre-ice-age remnant flora , whilst in Teesdale − whole fields
covered with what looked like giant dark golden buttercups − now considered
to be a sub-species of Marsh marigold I think ( but am not too sure − too
rare to be in my pocket flora) .
All the while my garden was being drenched with the heavy showers which
Southern England had ; very well arranged on my part ! ( I give credit to
the brand of joss sticks I get from Harrods, you know ).

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] In my garden.
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hello Rocky − nice pictures of your terrestrials. Attached is one of my D. praetermissa, clear light green leaves, no spots, 9 spikes of lightly darker spotted lilac flowers. The bee orchids look attractive and I think I will have a look at Lanesides stuff when at Tatton (2 day event this year, 12 dealers, one from the Phillipines for first time) next weekend, I have never seen one live.
BTW − The cattleya back bulb in rocks is putting up another shoot!

Regards
Alex Scott

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Fog (was Wild orchids)
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Haar is a Scottish word for fog or Sea mist.
Ex Meteorologist, David

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catts
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Sorry to hear about your Catts Dennis but I'm glad they are recovering. I can quite see they wouldn't like the heat suddenly going like that. One year the oppostie happened here − the thermostat gave up the ghost and on one day I missed going in to check things − the following day I went in to find the temperature over 100F! Believe or not nothing suffered so I got away lightly that time. − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Alex
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

What a beautiful orchid Alex. Do you keep it inside or outside and what is it growing in please? Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Alex's pot of Orchids.
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hi there Alex,

And what a very nice pot of Dactylorhiza praetermissa that is. Of course, the common name for that orchid is Southern Marsh Orchid, but I hate geographical names, as the same orchid [as I have said before] grows in the NORTH of France. I always think that is better to call it the Common Marsh orchid.

I especially liked to see the leaves that were about right angles to the main stem.

In the Early Marsh orchid, the leaves tend to grow quite upright close to the main stem.

The Early Marsh stem is very HOLLOW. The Common marsh orchid's stem is almost solid, with just a small hollow.

Alex, how about a close up of the flowers please. Just to show the shape of the lip and the type of markings.

Great news about your Cattleya backbulb.

As we must keep reminding ourselves and telling others, orchids do not grow in what gardeners commonly call 'Compost'. Orchids do not grow IN, they, the epiphytes, grow ON.

Regards, Rocky.

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From: jan
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Fog (was Wild orchids)
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Tricia Garner wrote:
> On 31 May,
> geoff hands wrote:
>> The word is also used in the north of England − which was once
>> Viking Country.... the men on the weather forecast speall it harr.
>
> Erm... I think they spell it haar, Scandinavian style.
>
Actually, the Danish word would be 'gus' (pronounced rather like
'goose'); it was the context that made me think of this meaning rather
than the word itself. The spelling 'haar' is more like the was the
Danish word for 'hair' would have been spelled a century ago. The 'aa'
is now written 'å' (an 'a' with a circle on top, I wonder what it comes
out as on people's computers), and 'haar' or 'hår' is pronounced a bit
like the good, old English word 'hoar', which I belive means more or
less the same.

/jan

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Gavin's Safari.
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hi Gavin,

Seems as though you had a nice day. I like the photos, especially the one of the Common Spotted orchid.

I am sure that you were really chuffed with finding the Bee orchid.

The Fragrant orchid..........keep a good photo of the lip shape, 'cos later on you might just be able to see the other two Fragrant orchids..........the Laxiflora type, and the Marsh Fragrant.

Keep the photos coming.

Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Another fine day
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hi all, had another fine day today out on safari virtually in my back yard.I bumped into a sheep farmer who kindly put me onto a field absolutely stuffed with common spotted orchids, but much better than that around thirty Greater butterfly orchids and something else that caught my eye was some early purples going over but packed with seed pods. Here are some piccy's for you to enjoy, until next time,happy growing.Gavin

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From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] A lot of nonsense about.
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hi Rocky,

I realise that nearly six months, S-i-x m-o-n-t-h-s !, have pasased since we last communicated over rocks.
That's an awful lotof spam been deleted!

Haven't forgotten 'bout the promised specimens . . .. honest!
Cheers
John

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From: Kenneth Bruyninckx
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catts and others
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hello Dennis,

4°C is low indeed however depending on the state of the plants AND most
importantly the amount of moisture!

We've once had the greenhouse temperature go down during wintertime to
similar figures (and in fact a bit colder in the cool greenhouse), we got
away with it (and so did our plants) because they were dry at the time!

Plants can take a lot but if they would have been wet then it would have
been a completely different story.

Kind regards,

Kenneth.

Kenneth Bruyninckx

Akerne Orchids

Laarsebeekdreef 4, B-2900 Schoten, Belgium

tel. +32 (0)3 651 40 36 fax +32 (0)3 653 06 76


www.akerne-orchids.com

See us at the following shows and events in 2008:

· Peterborough International Orchid Show, Peterborough, UK (14-15/6)

Dennis Read wrote:

> My computer is very sick. It is with the consultant who will examine it next
> teusday. I am using someone else's machine and have caught part of the
> discussion on Cattleya. I have also had a problem with my Cattleya,
> Coelogyne and Odontoglossum allaince (kept in two green houses)

> I eventually discovered that for one night we lost power for 6
> hours-midnight till 6 am. As all was running at 9 am and the temp. had
> dropped to 4C. It was not untill the plants started rotting that I realised
> I had a problem.

> They all seem to be recovering other than Coel. xyrekes.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Kenneth Bruyninckx
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catts
Date: Sun, 01 Jun 2008

Hello Jean,

It is indeed a bit of a mystery.

Two things which I find curious are that you permenantly have a fan on AND
that during wintertime your watering schedule is like every third week

In our greenhouse there is no need for a fan due to fact that:

1) it is a big greenhouse (700 m²)

2) it is an old greenhouse (yes 'our' wrens have found some openings
somewhere to get back in and out all the time) so there are bound to be
openings and

3) we, like everybody else, shift plants according to changing environments
and changing 'size' of plants to prevents stale pockets of air.

In smaller greenhouses there is sometimes a need to install a fan because
you have completely closed all the gaps that could help in refreshing the
air naturally, but having the fan on permenantly? Is the greenhouse that
crowded? Bench and airspace completely filled?

Concerning the watering schedule, is it really every third week during
wintertime as this would mean that the pots stay moist for up to 3 weeks?

Our watering schedule during summertime is every 3 days roughly (unless when
we have a very, very hot and dry summer), during wintertime it could be less
depending on the weather: wet, dark and gloomy for days on end or the other
extreme: clear open skies and severe frost for days on end the first one
means less water maybe once a week (I should check with my father but I
doubt that we have the luxury to not water for more than 1,5 weeks), the
latter one means resuming almost our summertime regime because of extensive
heating leading to drier conditions.

I can imagine that a Cattleya with 'wet' feet for up to 3 weeks would be
very unhappy. Is your watering schedule the same when they are grown indoors
(these conditions would be less humid so I expect that your watering rhythm
would have been increased)?

What is the humidity like inside the greenhouse in all 4 seasons?

Kind regards,

Kenneth.

Kenneth Bruyninckx

Akerne Orchids

Laarsebeekdreef 4, B-2900 Schoten, Belgium

tel. +32 (0)3 651 40 36 fax +32 (0)3 653 06 76


www.akerne-orchids.com

See us at the following shows and events in 2008:

· Peterborough International Orchid Show, Peterborough, UK (14-15/6)

Jean Lewis wrote:

> Kenneth and Rocky thank you so much for your replies. Thanks Kenneth for
> that info. I am keeping them at that temp at night and am not quite sure why
> they seem unhappy in the greenhouse. I have a fan permanently on and on
> warmer days open the door and louvred windows to let plenty of air circulate
> − also two roof vents. Everything I have will flower but the plants often
> look sickly which I find very odd. I'll print out your email and study it
> more carefully. I need to spot what it is that they are unhappy with. I
> should have the watering and feeding right as I use an indicator in each one
> to alert me when they need watering which at the moment is about once a
> week. During the winter it was roughly every third week. The ones I have
> moved into the conservatory in our house seem to have more or less recovered
> and are now making new growths.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Gordon Walker
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Another fine day
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Well spotted and photographed.
Gordon.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catts
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Too low temperature and too high humidity black patches. No mystery Jean !

Geoff

Jean Lewis wrote:

> ...They all start to get black patches so I think it's a too low temp
> together with the level of humidity. Something of a mystery...

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Kenneth's answers.
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Hello Kenneth,

Full marks for what you have just said. I completely agree with you.

And if anyone, especially U.K. residents have any doubts, then ask them what they like best......................a cold, dry, clear Winters day when NO FROST appears on the windscreen of their cars, or one of those horrible wet cold days that get right into their bones.

Thanks Kenneth, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catts and others
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Kenneth, I agree, but the previous daywas bright and sunny so I watered. The worst affected wasmy Rhyncholaelia but I've recovered a bit but it is relly struggling.
Dennis

Kenneth Bruyninckx wrote:

Hello Dennis,

> 4°C is low indeed however depending on the state of the plants AND
> most importantly the amount of moisture!

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catts
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Thanks Kenneth. I'll print your letter out so that I can study it better when I am less rushed (busy day today). I have indicators in each pot which tell me when to water and yes they seem to go 2 − 3 weeks in winter whether outside our inside and I only have them in bark so they shouldn't remain too wet. As I said the ones indoors are fine and yes the it is a 8 x 6 geenhouse and insulated inside for winter and I keep the fan on to keep air ciruclating. I suppose it depends too on the temperature they are kept at? As I say I'll read your letter more thoroughly later − thanks for the reply − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Another fine day
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Good photos Gavin. The white orchid is the one we have locally. − Jean

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From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: phal fear
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

I'd like to hear some advice/opinions re the following: my lovely phal that
finally bloomed after 2 years in my care seems very healthy and happy in its
pot. It recently finished blooming for the first time since I've had it, and
has a new root starting now, as well as 4 long roots that grew, over the
past year, out over the edges of the pot and down into the water tray below.
I know I should repot it now.... but I'm in mortal fear of doing something
to change it's current happy state! Do you all think I should a) repot it
back into the same pot with the roots growing over the edges b) repot it
into a larger pot with the roots all inside the pot or c) not repot it
??? TIA Sue B

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Observation.
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Hi Gavin,

I hope you do not mind, but I have used your close up of the Greater Butterfly Orchid to ask a question. And it is this.....notice the brownish-red markings just above the opening of the long spur. What do you think it is????

Also, did you notice the way in which the two pollinia slope inwards.

And you can see at the bottom of the pollinia, the sticky 'patches' that glue it to an insects head.

Next time you are in that area, can you take perhaps a side on view showing the entire spur, and the liquid in it.

Plenty in flower in the Forest, so I may be giving you a call in a few days or so.

Cheers Rodge.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: New Forest Orchids.
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Hi all, especially our Jean,

Two 'White Ones' and a New Forest speciality.

No 7. The Lesser Butterfly Orchid. No time for a close up as the rain started to pour down, but note the PARALLEL position of the two pollinia.

No 8. Most probably a hybrid between the Early Marsh Orchid and the Heath Spotted Orchid. Note the very long leaf bracts around the flower buds.

No 9. A form of the Early Marsh Orchid. But this one is almost pure white with just a little yellow at the top of the lip.

Another 'Safari' in a few days time.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catts
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Thanks Geoff that's what I've suspected for some time and that confirms it. I'll settle for growing a few in the house and keep the cooler things outside as those that are happy there are doing really well. − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Roger
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

lol Now I've had more time to look at the photographs again I can see that the two white orchids are not the same. At first glance I was so concerned at how busy this day was going to be that I didn't look properly. They are good specimens aren't they and the photos are really good. Thanks for the info. Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Phal
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Sue any chance of a photo? I think it depends on the size of your orchid and the size of the pot. Also of course what medium it is in and how long it has been in it. This is probably the orchid I'm best at growing out of all the different genera I have and I have found that they actually do like space to grow unlike a number of other orchids which thrive in small pots. If these are arial roots it's not alot of use putting them in the compost as often they die off but if they are live new roots it may be worth covering them with compost. I used to use bark as the sole medium but nowadays I use bark and a little vermiculite and loam type orchid compost and I always use clear pots and I've have had multiple flower spikes and they flower each year − some more than once if I cut the existing spikes to the next node down. I know it's a bit worrying at first but after repotting a few you'll see how easy it is. Good luck with it anyway. − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] phal fear
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

No.( don't repot into a larger pot, or preferably at all)

They don't like being in larger pots , I find.

Usually the compost breaks down and gets washed away , each time you water
and drain ; and if its healthy you end up with a pot really full of roots.
They seem very happy like that !

geoff

Sue Brinsko wrote:

> Do you all think I should
> a) repot it
> back into the same pot with the roots growing over the edges
> b) repot it into a larger pot with the roots all inside the pot or
> c) not repot it

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: forest advice
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Hi Rocky, like the photo's, is the difference in the pollinia alignement a constant between the lesser and greater butterfly orchid?As they are very similar apart from quite subtle differences,and this makes it a lot quicker to identify it.Also i am planning to go to lyndhurst at some point, i notice on the ordinance survey map a wood that looks mainly broadleaf to the southwest of lyndhurst, would this be a good choice for a orchid safari?Also ive found where i think the old railway passed through downton so im going to have a look at some point to see if our lizard is still there. Hope to see you soon.happy growing!
Gavin

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] phal fear
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Hi Sue, I think as long as the plant is happy;and it sounds like it is;and more importantly the compost is still in good condition id leave it alone.happy growing!
Gavin

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Observation.
Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008

Hi Roger, here is a piccy of the spur,Does the plant stick the pollen to the butterfly's head or to its eyes, as ive heard talks on terrestrials in madagascar and a lot of them use a similar transfer mechanism but as questioned they stick the pollinia to the butterfly's eye 's.Why is the spur only a third full,is it to insure the plant gets the correct sized or speceis of pollinator or is it to put less strain on the plants reserves?Also ive got a few good books now so i can tackle the idents a bit easier as long as i dont meet to many hybrids just yet.Also whilst on safari i came across alot of common spotted with out the characteristic pair of red ring markings on the lip!and having more of a spot and streak marking but still having the long middle tip on the lip could these be hybrids with heath spotted?happy growing!
Gavin

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From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] phal fear
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Excellent! Thanks, Geoff. If it will be happier staying the way it is, I'll
be happy to leave it there. Good thing I asked, for I did not think that
would be the answer! Everything I've read seems to say repot every year, but
the plant is successful right now, so I was loath to risk upsetting it!Sue B

On Mon, Jun 2, 2008
wrote:

> No.( don't repot into a larger pot, or preferably at all)
>
> They don't like being in larger pots , I find.
>
> Usually the compost breaks down and gets washed away , each time you water
> and drain ; and if its healthy you end up with a pot really full of roots.
> They seem very happy like that !

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phal
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hi Jean, thanks for your reply. I'll try for a new photo tomorrow (the plant
is currently enjoying dusk) Meanwhile, I'll attach the old photo (about a
year old?) of this phal. It is still in the same pot as in the old photo,
but is now larger leaved and has more roots, and of course a spike that has
finished one bloom cycle.The compost is fir bark, which is unchanged since I
repotted it to this pot approximately a year ago (maybe a little less). Sue
B

On Mon, Jun 2, 2008
wrote:

> Sue any chance of a photo? I think it depends on the size of your orchid
> and the size of the pot. Also of course what medium it is in and how long it
> has been in it.
[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phal
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Jean, the date on my older photo, I just noticed, is 2 of 2007, so the phal
has been in this pot at least that long. Sue B

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Sue's Phalaenopsis.
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Good morning Sue................I'm damned if it aint !!!

Rain, rain, and more rain.

Sue, have a good look at the photo and note the wonderful amount of perfect roots.

They are dark green because ALL of the root is full of moisture/food.

I read that someone stated that Phallys do not have a storage area/bulb like some other epiphytes........................well, I would ask that person to look at all of those large roots.............that is their storage area.

Geoff wrote: Usually the compost breaks down and gets washed away. And of course he is quite correct. Others talk about the compost turning ACID like after a while..................so, for Christ's sake why use such muck?????

The pot that your Phally came in should do it for the rest of its life, unless it really does grow huge. Don't forget, Phallys are like Vandas, they grow upright. I would keep the 'See-through pot as you can SEE what is going on. As to what you put in the pot to keep the plant from falling over is up to you. If it was up to me, I would use something that NEVER rots or breaks down, and also something that was heavier than bark etc. etc.

Cheers, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Another fine day
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hello Gavin − you seem o have struck a 'hotspot' for terrestrials there. What is the name of the white orchid in the 4th picture. Is that the butterfly?

Regards
Alex Scott

gavin horne wrote:

> Hi all, had another fine day today out on safari virtually in my
> back yard.I bumped into a sheep farmer who kindly put me onto a
> field absolutely stuffed with common spotted orchids, but much
> better than that around thirty Greater butterfly orchids and
> something else that caught my eye was some early purples going over
> but packed with seed pods. Here are some piccy's for you to enjoy,
> until next time,happy growing.Gavin

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Alex's pot of Orchids.
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hello Rocky − here is a bit more detail of the marsh orchid flowers.
Regards
Alex Scott

Roger Grier

> Hi there Alex,

> And what a very nice pot of Dactylorhiza praetermissa that is. Of
> course, the common name for that orchid is Southern Marsh Orchid,
> but I hate geographical names, as the same orchid [as I have said
> before] grows in the NORTH of France. I always think that is better
> to call it the Common Marsh orchid.

[Snip]

> Alex, how about a close up of the flowers please. Just to show the
> shape of the lip and the type of markings.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Alex
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

yes Jean, its a pretty one. I bring it inside when in flower but its kept outside, in a clay pot, a mix of peat compost, sandy garden soil and home compost, very damp in a saucer of water. I put it right next to the house in winter for a bit of shelter but they are perfectly hardy.
Regards
Alex Scott

Jean Lewis wrote:

> What a beautiful orchid Alex. Do you keep it inside or outside and
> what is it growing in please?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Gavin's photos.
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hi Gavin,

Got any 'Waders' ???

The second photo that you posted is most interesting as, those who are observant will see a nice red ant crawling on the flower.

I am quite certain that the pollinia are stuck to the visiting insects side of its head, that is, on the Greater Butterfly orchid.

The marks that I asked about.................I have seen these several times and they coincide with the question about the liquid in the spur.......................which is only in the bottom half an inch or so. Because this makes the insect, Butterfly and or Moth land on the flower, crawl right up between the two pollinia and then thrust its tongue down the tube/spur to get at the liquid. And, in this position, its forehead comes into contact with the sticky stigmatic surface, hence the 'Moustache' is formed from its hairs that are left behind.

If the liquid was that much higher in the tube, the insects could hover away from the flower, stick their tongues into the top part and never do what Mother Nature intended.

Here endeth today's lesson, ha, ha.

I just so much like what Mother Nature has to offer. How can anyone ever be bored.

Bloody rain, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] forest advice
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hi Gavin,

Yes, the pollinia are the main difference, and always easy to see. The other BIG difference id that the Lesser loves acid type soils where the Greater likes the chalk soils.

You asked about the wood that you saw on the Ordnance Survey map.

And here I must tell all of our 'Members' that Gavin and I have spoken on the phone a couple of times, and we have somewhat similar 'Country dialects', so it will come as no surprise to Gavin when I say.....Bugger the map, I'll show you, then you can mark the map, ha, ha.

Hopefully the Monsoon period will not last too long.

Cheers for now, Rocky.

gavin horne wrote:

> Hi Rocky, like the photo's, is the difference in the pollinia
> alignement a constant between the lesser and greater butterfly
> orchid?

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: roger
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hi Roger, please can you give me some idea of how long it might take for the broad leaved helloborine pictured below to come into flower?many thanks,happy growing!Gavin

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Another fine day
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

Hi Alex, yes that is the greater butterfly orchid.Happy growing!Gavin

Alex wrote:

> Hello Gavin − you seem o have struck a 'hotspot' for terrestrials
> there. What is the name of the white orchid in the 4th picture.
> Is that the butterfly?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] phal fear
Date: Tue, 03 Jun 2008

I only repot if the compost is starting to decay ( which you can usually
tell − if you take a bit out, and it has darkened and softened − or if you
have access to an EC meter − and then water with pure water and measure the
EC of the drainings, If the compost is going off the EC will be up and the
pH down, as compared to the water which went into the pot. But many of my
plants are only repotted when they are too big for the pot , and sometimes
not even then. Cattleyas in particular do much better when they have one
foot out of bed as we used to say !

And again, if potted in grit and perlite, tghe compost hardly ever goes off
at all .

geoff

Sue Brinsko wrote:

> Excellent! Thanks, Geoff. If it will be happier staying the way it is, I'll
> be happy to leave it there. Good thing I asked, for I did not think that
> would be the answer! Everything I've read seems to say repot every year, but
> the plant is successful right now, so I was loath to risk upsetting it!Sue B

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: The need for repotting.
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Hi all,

Continuing the chat about Sue's question on the repotting of Phallys, I have something to say about 'Composts', and as Geoff wrote:

And again, if potted in grit and perlite, the compost hardly ever goes off at all.

Well, of course my 'Medium' NEVER GOES OFF. So we are getting there.

And now for Sue,

Sue, thanks for the very good photos, they show us all what we wanted to see.

First of all, may I say that your Phally should NEVER need a larger pot.....and where did you get that lovely pot???

Second: I would sooner see you remove the white clay saucer and just sit the pot on top of the small stones/grit, which always have water just about up to the bottom of the pot. Not too high that the bottom of the pot is in water.

Lastly.........steady Rocky.......I don't like to see those 'Butterfly/Insect' plastic thins that keep the spike from falling over.

As I pot my Phallys in the rock chippings, and as they are HEAVY, I hardly ever need to stake the flower spikes. Again, as half a Scotsman, this takes away the need to buy stakes etc. Go on Smile !!!

Cheers, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Sue's advice about repotting.
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Mornin' Sue,

You told us all what you had read: Everything I've read seems to say repot every year. Well, what an absolute load of nonsense, but of course we must all remember, as I always say, there are us folk who are the HOBBYISTS, and them what talks all that daft stuff, are the COMMERCIAL GUYS.

Maybe their medium only lasts for one year, which I guess is what they aim at. Plant dies..........customer buys another one.

Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Broad-leaved Helleborine.
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Mornin' Gavin,

How long before it will be in flower.

I normally recommend about beginning of August, but then there is no 'NORMAL' when it comes to our weather these last few years. I would say have a good look from the middle of July.

Cheers Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Alex's pot of orchids.
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Mornin' Alex,

Please excuse me asking about your lovely pot of orchids, but if you ever see the hundreds, maybe thousands of hybrids in the New Forest area, you will understand why I keep on.

Can I possibly see a closer shot of the bottom of the plants. I would like to see the leaves, and possibly a close up of just one or two flowers.

In the next few weeks I will take photos of this type and show you what we have in the Forest.

Thanks, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Alex
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Thanks Alex. I've very tempted to try them. I have seen a few very good specimens at various exhibitions and now spurred on by your photograph I'm anxious to try them. Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Sue and Phals
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Hi Sue,
Great photos! Thanks. It makes everything clear now. I love the pot it's in too − perfect for drainage. No no need to do anything. It is healthy, making new roots (let them do their own thing) and plenty of room in the pot. One general rule seems to be to repot after about 18 months as bark starts to break down a bit and there are then not enough air pockets around pieces of bark. It would be best then to use the same kind of orchid bark which you should have no problem locating on the Internet if there isn't a local orchid nursery near you. When you do come to repot I would go for a transparent pot − there will be no holes in it except for lots around the bottom of the pot. I was sceptical of these pots but after seeing our local members coming in with such splendid Phals I tried them and within a few weeks saw a difference. − You have a really sturdy healthy plant there Sue and with luck it'll be with you for many years flowering each year too. − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Roger Phals
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

What a great photo Roger of the Phals growing attached to the tree. I'll have to print this one off to show to my other half. I've explained the natural habitat to so many people and it would be so helpful to be able to show a photograph like this. − Great weather here today for once! Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Be kind to slugs week... ( give them a quick and easy death)
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Ammonia.

What proportions ?

I think 1:4 with water was suggested ( discounting all the home grown bomb
formulae ! ).

This seems a bit strong , just a gut reaction if I may be excused the
phrase.

Has anyone used ammonia, and if so in what proportions ?

Maybe I'm prompted by my intention to drench (dip) all the pots on my main
bench where I am getting an awful lot of blossom damage , and I have looked
at the four bottles I have bought ( of ½ litre each) and realised that at
4:1 it will hardly make a good bucketful, which won't go far with my
collection.

Advice ?

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Amonia definition help, agua sedativa, amoniaco
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Hi all,

Here in Costa Rica Ammonia is not an off the shelf product. it needs to be ordered from a chemical supply house. The term here is amoniaco, the do not supply it in liquid forms. Which brings me to my next concerns what is the chemical composition, strength of the ammonia you all use. Is it labeled?

I am trying to figure out how to get some amoniac (it comes in gas and powder forms) but then I need to convert it to something I can use in a strength that will not turn all my plants orange;-).

They also sell a solution of agua sedativa which has a lot of ammonia in it at the pharmacy I am trying to track that down and figure out what it really is more on this later...

I would very much like if you all could read your ammonia labels and tell me the chemical composition, strength or what ever other info is on there that may be useful to me.

If there are any other spanish speakers out there that can provide some insite to amoniaco and how I can make it into "houshold strength cloudy amonia" I would also be very grateful.

Jim

Thanks,

Jim

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: A GOOD DAY ON THE CHALK DOWNS
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Hello all, i was at a clients house doing some work and finished a couple hours early, so i deceided to go and explore the local chalk downs.It was teaming with lots of the usual butterflies and wildflowers.Next i discovered a whole hoard of common spotted orchids and a potential pyramid orchid in early spike, but the highlight has to be the burnt orchids i found after walking past them twice;as usual i have put some photo's on for your pleasure.Also i found what looks like a common spotted but the lip is wrong; im wondering if it could be a highbred with a fragrant orchid perhaps. If you can help please feel free as i would be very interested.Happy growing!Gavinp.s. i have been now told of a site at the same place where there are a whole lot of burnt orchids all together, so i will go back tomorrow and try and find them and get some piccy's for us all.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] The need for repotting.
Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008

Hi Rocky, In the current photos of this phal (taken today) you can see that
in the past year or so I've come to some of the same conclusions you
suggest. Instead of the tiny ceramic tray of wet gravel, I have a much
larger, deeper tray of wet gravel. I've also abandoned the plastic spike
clips because I actually admire the lovely, graceful curve the flower spike
gets if you don't use a clamp. (I also feared that forcing it straight with
a clamp might break the spike!) What the new photos do not show is that this
plant usually has a companion plant in the tray with it... a large African
Violet that was moved out of the way while I took the photos) The white pot
is from our local discount store "Walmart" . If I remember correctly it was
only about $5, but it's really hard to find a nice plain one. Most of them
are "cute' colors, with holes in the shape of butterflies, hearts, etc. Way
too 'cute" for my taste. Sue B

On Wed, Jun 4, 2008
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Continuing the chat about Sue's question on the repotting of Phallys, I
> have something to say about 'Composts', and as Geoff wrote:
>
> And again, if potted in grit and perlite, the compost hardly ever goes off
> at all.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tony Watkinson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Amonia definition help, agua sedativa, amoniaco
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Hi

Geoff wrote

Ammonia. What proportions ?

4 to 1 is what was recommended in the original article that I read (and posted for your info)

I think 1:4 with water was suggested ( discounting all the home grown bomb formulae ! ).

This seems a bit strong − just a gut reaction if I may be excused the phrase.

Has anyone used ammonia, and if so in what proportions ?

I have used it like that and it works for me. (not the slugs)

Maybe I'm prompted by my intention to drench (dip) all the pots on my main bench where I am getting an awful lot of blossom damage , and I have looked at the four bottles I have bought ( of ½ litre each) and realised that at 4:1 it will hardly make a good bucketful, which won't go far with my collection.

Cloudy ammonia costs around $2 per litre here in Aust. so that would be around one pound UK. I have used it as a spray into the pots and under the benches. I noticed the other day that there are lots of dead garlic snails (you may call them bush snails or some other name) in the green moss that is growing on the floor of me greenhouse.

Jim wrote

I would very much like if you all could read your ammonia labels and tell me the chemical composition, strength or what ever other info is on there that may be useful to me.

My wife gets it from the local supermarket and the label reads "20g/L of Ammonia (as NH3)" I don't have much idea what that means but I assume it means 20 grams per litre.

I just googled 'ammonia & slugsand found this...

http://www.hillgardens.com/slugs.htm#ammonia

Household ammonia at the correct dilution not only destroys slugs, at that dilution the solution actually provides a source of nitrogen which plants absorb through their foliage-"foliar feeding". Mix 1 part household ammonia (I prefer the non-sudsing type, but either works well) with 5 parts of non-chlorinated, non-softened water-for a total of 6 parts. A few others have suggested a much stronger dilution...and, yes, it'll kill slugs quicker but there's a higher risk of burning relatively tender new leaves. The 1:5 is highly effective-with far less risk of scorched foliage.

Also this

http://www.globalgardens.com/slugs-a.html

Larry Clemmons, an accomplished hosta grower from Dubuque, had an almost slug-free gorgeous garden last year while many of his friends from nearby towns were being overrun. Unlike the beer and lightweight chemicals they were using, Larry was spraying the hosta once a week or so with a dilute solution of plain old ammonia. The slugs hate the ammonia and the plants love the nitrogen. He uses a regular inexpensive tank and nozzle sprayer and went over and down into each plant-and he has a lot of them. He sprays the hostas with a dilute (4:1 or even weaker) solution of water and household ammonia in the evening once a week-more often in the spring or with a lot of rain. It would take him no more than two hours a week and there were almost no slug holes. The folks visiting from Iowa City which was being inundated by mollusks were astounded by his lush foliage just a few miles away and many have adopted his system.

And this

http://www.ghorganics.com/page13.html

Ammonia spray: Slugs like to lay eggs on the crown of hostas and then the tiny baby slugs do tremendous damage as the new growth is emerging. When using this spray on hostas it may be advisable to rinse off their leaves with water about an hour after spraying to prevent leaf burn. Some of our readers report that they do not rinse the leaves off and have no problem with leaf burn. You will need to see how your plants react to this. Make your spray as follows: mix 3 ounces of ammonia with 16 ounces of water. Cheap source of nitrogen too.

And this

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/hosta/msg0402425321998.html

a.. Posted by ken_adrian z5 Adrian,MI (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 5, 07 at 13:42

yes ... eggs are in the soil ... look like roe/caviar .... about pinhead size.. translucent ... squishy ... move the mulch around near the hosta and you will see them ...
no one really knows if ammonia/vinegar.. 10% solution kills the eggs ... don't really know why it wouldn't dehydrate them ...

the solution is contact kill for slugs.. no prevention .. so you have to keep at it.. spraying weekly or so .. until the population falls ...

but the bottom line ... at 10% ... a gallon of either will make 10 gals of solution ... WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO LOSE ... besides some good spring exercise ...

check the pickling aisle at the grocer for vinegar .. the laundry aisle for ammonia ... i prefer vinegar .. it doesn't burn my eyes at application ... and i cant seem to avoid taking a whiff for the pain .. go figure on that ...

there might be a FAQ about such ....

soooo .... what do you have to lose????

Enough??

Tony

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John J. Rupp
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [?? Probable Spam] [OrchidTalk] Amonia definition help, agua sedativa, amoniaco
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Hi Jim,

Have you tried to find household ammonia in the grocery store? It
usually can be found there in the cleaning products section.

In the pure form, ammonia (amoniac or amoniaco in spanish), NH3, has a
boiling point of -33 deg C, so is a gas at room temperature. Solutions
of ammonia in water are called aqueous ammonia or the older name of
ammonium hydroxide, NH4OH, NH3 + H2O. A saturated solution of NH3 in
water is called concentrated ammonia and is 28-29% ammonia by weight.
This is what chemists normally purchase from the supply houses.

Smelling salts are just dilute ammonia solutions − 10% ammonia.

Household ammonia is more dilute yet at 5-10% ammonia. Cloudy ammonia
just has a small amount of detergent added to help make it a better
cleaning agent.

Jim, I don't know what you mean when you say the "amoniac ... comes in
... powder form". The only thing I can think of for the powder would be
ammonium chloride, NH4Cl, which when heated would break down into NH3
and HCl, but I can't imagine using this to make anything like household
ammonia.

I don't think you would want to use the "agua sedativa" on plants. It
is a mixture of aqueous ammonia, camphor, and sea salt. Different
formulations of this have different percentages of ammonia.

I hope this is some help to you.

John R

JIM MATEOSKY wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Here in Costa Rica Ammonia is not an off the shelf product. it needs
> to be ordered from a chemical supply house. The term here is amoniaco,
> the do not supply it in liquid forms. Which brings me to my next
> concerns what is the chemical composition, strength of the ammonia
> you all use. Is it labeled?

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sue's advice about repotting.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

So very definite... no room for doubt...

There are those who say, or maybe too polite to say , merely think , that
those who talk sense are commercial types ( their living depends on it ? )
and those who talk "all that daft stuff" − would they be hobbyists ?

Generalisations are odious.

geoff

Roger Grier wrote:

> Mornin' Sue,

> You told us all what you had read: Everything I've read seems to say repot
> every year. Well, what an absolute load of nonsense, but of course we must
> all remember, as I always say, there are us folk who are the HOBBYISTS, and
> them what talks all that daft stuff, are the COMMERCIAL GUYS.

> Maybe their medium only lasts for one year, which I guess is what they aim
> at. Plant dies..........customer buys another one.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sue and Phals
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

There must be a good case for saying that there are orchids, and then there
are phalaenopsis. They are so different in so many respects- what else will
give you so much flower over such a long period, even when grown as a house
plant by Mrs Joe Bloggs who knows absolutely nothing about any for of plant
?

Geoff

Jean Lewis wrote:

> Hi Sue,

> Great photos! Thanks. It makes everything clear now. I love the pot
> it's in too − perfect for drainage. No no need to do anything. It is
> healthy, making new roots (let them do their own thing) and plenty of room
> in the pot. One general rule seems to be to repot after about 18 months as
> bark starts to break down a bit and there are then not enough air pockets
> around pieces of bark...
[Snip}

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Amonia definition help, agua sedativa, amoniaco
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

My bottles say it is sold as a multi-surface cleaner, when it should be
diluted 1:20. Also says "contains ammonia solution" − irritating to eyes,
respiratory system and skin. It's called "MAX power" − web site is
www.challs.com but no further info there.

I guess I'll try that strength ( 1:20) on one or two of the worst pots and
watch for results, first of all.

geoff

JIM MATEOSKY wrote:

> Hi all,

> Here in Costa Rica Ammonia is not an off the shelf product. it
> needs to be ordered from a chemical supply house. The term here is
> amoniaco, the do not supply it in liquid forms. Which brings me to
> my next concerns what is the chemical composition, strength of the
> ammonia you all use. Is it labeled?...
[Snip]
> ...I would very much like if you all could read your ammonia labels
> and tell me the chemical composition, strength or what ever other
> info is on there that may be useful to me.
[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sue and Phals....moan , moan moan − its me that is doing the moaning.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Please , please , please − do not reply to a message after carefully
deleting the message you are replying to − or whatever. Maybe you use a
programme which is set up that way ; if so , then please, please, please
copy just a few words , such as " Roger said..." so that the message you are
answering can be tracked down.

If you don't do this − and of course Jean, you are not the only culprit -
you are simply having a private conversation. In which case, why use the
group ?

I say this because I have not seen the photo you mention ; maybe I missed
it, or didn't open up the attachment, or maybe my ISP failed to send it on ;
whatever. The point is that with no reference I can't track it down.

What we want is threads − not isolated messages out of context.

End of rant, sorry about that, but it's not the first time this week......

Geoff

Jean Lewis wrote:

> Hi Sue,

> Great photos! Thanks. It makes everything clear now. I love the pot
> it's in too − perfect for drainage. No no need to do anything. It is
> healthy, making new roots (let them do their own thing) and plenty of room
> in the pot. One general rule seems to be to repot after about 18 months as
> bark starts to break down a bit and there are then not enough air pockets
> around pieces of bark. It would be best then to use the same kind of orchid
> bark which you should have no problem locating on the Internet if there
> isn't a local orchid nursery near you. When you do come to repot I would go
> for a transparent pot − there will be no holes in it except for lots around
> the bottom of the pot. I was sceptical of these pots but after seeing our
> local members coming in with such splendid Phals I tried them and within a
> few weeks saw a difference. − You have a really sturdy healthy plant there
> Sue and with luck it'll be with you for many years flowering each year too.
> − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: photos
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Great photos Gavin − how lovely to find these in the middle of a busy day. − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: U.K. Wild Orchids.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Mornin' Gavin,

How nice to mix business with pleasure....lucky man.

The Burnt Tip orchids, were you by any chance at Martin Down ???

I can fully realise how you walked right past them as they are not that easy to find. But, wait until you try to find the Frog orchid on similar soil and site.

Why do you think that the Common Spotted orchid has the wrong lip ?????? Did you take any photos of the leaves and markings, if so, lease send them on.

Answer to the Lip problem later, ha, ha.

Cheers Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Repotting.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Mornin' Jean and all,

'Our Jean' wrote..... One general rule seems to be to repot after about 18 months as bark starts to break down a bit and there are then not enough air pockets around pieces of bark. It would be best then to use the same kind of orchid bark which you should have no problem locating on the Internet if there isn't a local orchid nursery near you.

A 'General Rule' )(*)(*&^%$%£%)*_)_+ and then 'Repot after about 18 months _)(**(^*^%£$%(*&*)_ and then It would be best to use the same kind of bark etc. !"$£"£^$£$*^%)((_++++)^%)(_()

Of course it will work, but after a while you are going to have the same problem.

As I grow in stone/rock chippings I do not have these problems, and only need to repot a Phally when it gets so tall and the bottom leaves have dropped off to leave a bare stem. Then its just take it out of the pot, cut off the bare stem and repot it with THE SAME STONES, leaves to pot rim level, and off we go again.

Bark is just the throw away item from many Timber/saw mills.

Just to get you all going, ha, ha. But it's true.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchid portraits (1) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

The first four of the snaps I took yesterday and some comments;

B. verrucosa − big, big spider orchid, faintly scented. Several spikes, but
you don't see the lovely detail if I show all the plant. Easy intermediate
orchid, fairly reliably produces double leads from each bulb if decently
grown.

Bulbo eberhardtii − I've show it before, but thought this plan view to be
interesting. Now in an about 9inch pan, and is growing into a complete
football − growths out from the rim and growing underneath the pan as well
as on top − hence flowers everywhere. Has had maybe 20 so far this year ?
More beds developing all the time. Quite big "daisies" maybe 4 inch across.
Not very easy to show !

D densiflorum. A pig to grow. Needs to be bone dry for so long you think its
dead, then you see the buds which get big and fat . Flowers not long lived,
maybe a week in photographable condition and even then only days "in
perfection" as the old books say.

D.hercoglossom. Small flowers, an inch across, but everywhere on thin canes
a couple of feet high. Plant has maybe a hundred or so, and its not a big
plant yet. Scented too.

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchid portraits (2) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

The Encyclia is a delightful orchid. So easy to grow − keep it dry in the
winter ( very hard bulb and leaves gives the clue).

I put the Epi- pseudo-epi in since it was given as a possible name for a
quite different epi recently , but this species is very distinct and easily
recognised. They all look like this with a bit of variation in the depth of
the yellow/orange even reddish-brown lip. In Central America they flower
with 30, 50 100 − who knows on a big jungle plant − flowers on each spray.
Mine produce that many, perhaps, but only 4 or 5 at a time, then when they
have dropped, another small branch opens from the same spike, and so on and
so on. Maybe one day I'll persuade one of the S.A nurseries to bring me a
really big and strong plant when they come over.... ( are you listening
Andrea ? )

Harella an enormous flower for the size of plant which measures maybe 2
inches across, and the flower 1 inch !

Hexisea, can form a swarming mass of bulbs and flowers. One day, I dream....

Laelia − well you can all sneer, and say "I can do better than that." But
when one has been growing something poorly and then it starts to recover and
does this, its just sheer delight, even if you can show me far more flowers
on a plant. Maybe next year I can... its optimism like this which has kept
me growing for most of my ( now) 47 years of orchids. Ps it's scented too.

geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Sue's Pots.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Mornin' Sue,

Ah...memories of Walmart, and some of the excellent bargains for all types of items.

If you do ever try just one Phally in those delightful pots with just rock chippings, you will find that the spikes hardly ever require staking.

By the way, just remind me how cold your Winters are please.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Mokaras are so easy , always double spiked − last and last and last too.
Those who want to grow Vandas should try them. Of course they are not big
dinner plates , but still a decent size ( nice for a button-hole if that
takes your fancy. When I was younger we all wore one ( us chaps) to the
orchid Society meeting. Of course in those days we all wore suits too − none
of your jeans and tee shirt...if you put one on yopur tee shirt its a
corsage, and that makes me giggle ( for chaps, anyway).

The Nakamotoara was meant to be registered as N Joyce Hands, but I guess I
forgot to pot the form or something , and now I've forgotten what the
parents were. Asco Blue Boy x ???

Pap Bel Royale − flowers too big to get into the camera (joke) well they are
10 inches across − I don't use the word awesome, very often, but...

Had 4 flowers, but I clumsily broke an inadequately tied spike moving the
plant.

Rudolfiella. New to me too !!

Vasco Blue bay etc − I showed this part open previously. Thought you'd like
to see the flowers all open. Lovely.

Zygonis. An impossible colour to photograph ( out of gamut) . This is as
near as I can get − needs a topuch more red , I guess it is at the UV end
of the spectrum seen by me, but not by Mr Nikon.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchid portraits − dendrobium propagation
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Dennis introduced us to this technique which was new to me − I was always
taught − we all were − that orchids don't do cuttings or whatever....Those
who have not tried it may be interested. Pic 1 shows part of a tray of
leafless backbulbs (canes) laid on compost this February ( 3 months ago).
Pic 2 show a curiosity. Will it form a new plant ? Watch this space.

geoff

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From: Alex
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Alex's pot of orchids.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Yes, I'll get the camera out and have a click or two.
Regards
Alex Scott

Roger Grier wrote:

> Mornin' Alex,

> Please excuse me asking about your lovely pot of orchids, but if
> you ever see the hundreds, maybe thousands of hybrids in the New
> Forest area, you will understand why I keep on.

> Can I possibly see a closer shot of the bottom of the plants. I
> would like to see the leaves, and possibly a close up of just one
> or two flowers.

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From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits − dendrobium propagation
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Glad it worked. I wish I could remember where I learned ir. I expect it was from an old book.
Dennis

geoff hands wrote:

> Dennis introduced us to this technique which was new to me , I was
> always taught , we all were , that orchids don't do cuttings or
> whatever....

[Snip]

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From: PG Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Phal fear
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

I just want to show what Phallies can look like after 5 or 6 years in the same
pot. The 'old' original mixture is still in the bottom of the one picture.
The other picture shows a smaller pot inside a bigger pot. Also with the
original mixture in the pot. They seem to be happy that way.

Peter from Bloubergstrand

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Chemicals and the abbreviations.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Hi John-J,

John I cannot remember if we found that we had both worked for a similar company....me, it was Esso. Then I remembered a comical situation that once occurred.

We were sitting in the Control Room listening to some prat/wally/big head talking about this and that and quoting all of the chemical make ups, i.e. H [two] O, water. etc. etc. and etc.

After this twit had stopped I remember asking if he knew what CO-CO-A was......................................he gave up and when told what the answer was, well, he never bothered us again.

Humour breaks down barriers.

Cheers Rocky.

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From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sue and Phals
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Geoff, We all start out knowing nothing, do we not? Sue B

On Thu, Jun 5, 2008
wrote:

> There must be a good case for saying that there are orchids, and then
> there are phalaenopsis. They are so different in so many respects- what else
> will give you so much flower over such a long period, even when grown as a
> house plant by Mrs Joe Bloggs who knows absolutely nothing about any for of
> plant ?

[Snip]

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sue and Phals....moan , moan moan − its me that is doing the moaning.
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Geoff,
I received Sues pictures loud and clear and very good they were. The plants looks very clean and healthy.
Hasn't the group been busy recently, long may it continue this way. Yes the pot looks lovely, but being a macho man, if I saw one, I don't suppose I would buy it.
Ronbow.

geoff hands wrote:

> Please , please , please − do not reply to a message after
> carefully deleting the message you are replying to − or whatever.
> Maybe you use a programme which is set up that way ; if so , then
> please, please, please copy just a few words , such as " Roger
> said..." so that the message you are answering can be tracked down.

> If you don't do this − and of course Jean, you are not the only
> culprit − you are simply having a private conversation. In which
> case, why use the group ?

> I say this because I have not seen the photo you mention ; maybe I
> missed it, or didn't open up the attachment, or maybe my ISP failed
> to send it on ; whatever. The point is that with no reference I
> can't track it down.

[Snip]

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From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: unusual lip
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

hi roger i haven't got any clear shots of the lip from memory which is not that good i think they were slim pointed and vaguely spotted,could this be a hybrid with a fragrant orchid or pyramid as these are numerous in the area two.Ive attached the only piccy's of this orchid for you, if it is really interesting fillme in and i'll go back and try and find it again.Happy growing!
Gavin

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From: gavin horne
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: confusing marsh orchid (Rocky)
Date: Thu, 05 Jun 2008

Hi Rocky, can you help me confirm the identity of this marsh orchid, the flowers says southern marsh orchid but the foliage looks more like a early marsh orchid, i found it quite high up on chalky downland if this helps. hope you can help.happy growin!
Gavin

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: how to make a zyglo-petium (sp) flower?
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Folks,

I bought a few zyglos (Hybrids in flask) from Deroose in belgium a few years ago. No flowers yet, but these little buggers should have flowered. Any pointers on how to et them to flowers?

Thanks,

Jim

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From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sue and Phals
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Not quite...

Venus anonymous walked out of the waves, fully formed and ready for the
supermarket , so the Greek myths say...

And haven't you ever met a kid who knew it all and couldn't be told anything
?

geoff

Sue Brinsko wrote:

> Geoff, We all start out knowing nothing, do we not? Sue B

[Snip]

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Dactyl Orchids.
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Mornin' all,

Gavin asked me to identify his photo.....well, as you know, all four of the so named Dactyl orchids hybridise with each other very frequently, but his photo is of the Common Marsh orchid.

Identifying points are as follows: First of all, the leaves are at right angles to the main stem. Then the flower's lip is a different shape than the Early Marsh orchid. Also the lip does not have complete lines/loops on it, just many small marks.

Also Gavin, next time you are sat beside on of them, squeeze the stem. The Common Marsh orchid is more solid to the touch than the Early marsh. If you can find one of last years stems you will see what I mean.

Last but by no means least.....the Early Marsh is a much lighter green in its stem and leaves.

My two photos are of a Common Marsh Orchid found growing on Mother-In-Laws lawn.

You can see why they call them 'Palmate' orchids.....like a persons hand and fingers, but upside down.

The second photo shows the markings on the flower.

Cheers for now, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Common Marsh orchid.
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Mornin' all,

Before any of you have a go at me, let me entertain you.

The photo that I just sent to the 'Club' was stated to be the Common Marsh orchid, but, some of you may say that the lip normally has a rounded bottom to it. This one has a small point/tooth.

Welcome to the Wild Orchid Identification Club. Aaaaaaaaaaaaarghhhhhhhhhh.

And as I live in the New Forest area where all four of these buggers live, it is a complete nightmare to sometimes give a hybrid a certain sure name. But as us locals would say, 'Aint they beautiful though'!!!

Rocky.

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Geoff
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Sorry Geoff I seem to be doing something I'm unaware of. Can you tell me the best way of replying? What I do at the moment is read the mail, out to 'new message' and then after it has gone I delete the original message but in my options I have ticked that I don't want the original message to go as well as it annoys me when I get my original message back − don't ask me why it just does:) I don't think if I just hit 'reply' it will go through 'the list' will it? − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Repotting.
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Very true Rocky. Could you take a photo or two or of one or two of your Phallys in the stones? I may try one:) − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phal fear
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

They do look good Peter but if I left mine like that they'd die − I'm sure
of it. Maybe you have better humidity than I do but as mine are doing fine
with plenty of room I'll leave them as they are. Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Just beautiful all of them Geoff! My vandas have done well for years but this year they all look on their last legs! Maybe it's old age like their owner. Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (2) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Geoff I've just bought an Epidendrum pseudoepidendrum from Nardotto e Capello and their photograph of it looks the same as the one you have here. Do you keep this dry in winter? Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] how to make a zyglo-petium (sp) flower?
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Jim I couldnt grow Zygos very well until a friend who succeeds year after year told me to keep them really cool. She leaves hers outside until the temperature is going to drop below 6C and then takes them in. I started to do the same 2 years ago since when I get flower spikes and am not losing leaves as I used to − Jean

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From: Gordon Walker
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] how to make a zyglo-petium (sp) flower?
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Hi Jean,
Full sun, full shade, dappled or what?
Gordon.

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Emailing: 004, 046 (2), 042, 019
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Hello All,

Here are some recent phographs. 004: Haraella odorata 046: Wisteria
sinensis on the river bank a few hundred yards from home. 042:
Phalaenopsis lamelligera 019: Cymbidium devonianum with only 2 spikes.
It has had up to 10 spikes but was repotted a few years ago when it
outgrew its pot. It's obviously sulking now.

David

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (2) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

It is a reed stem epidendrum − so no bulbs. I carry on watering all the
year, but of course water less in the winter.

By the way − this message illustrates what happens when I click on "reply" -
your message appears below my answer − that's the way I like it.

Consider what happens if instead, I click on new message. Then I am saying "
its a reed stem..." but anyone reading the message will have no idea what
orchid I am talking about !

By using 'reply' instead of 'new message', then the question is seen as
well as the answer.

If the message being replied to is rather long , then it can be shortened,
by saying " Jean said − Geoff I've just bought an Epidendrum
pseudoepidendrum ...

And.. Do you keep this dry in winter? Jean − I put those bits in by
highlight/copy/paste .And the result is the same.

Geoff

Jean Lewis wrote:

> Geoff I've just bought an Epidendrum pseudoepidendrum from Nardotto e
> Capello and their photograph of it looks the same as the one you have here.
> Do you keep this dry in winter?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

I am of the opinion that Vandas - the way we grow them − are short lived
plants. I do regularly repot mine, so as to cut off bar stem and dead roots,
and stop them getting leggy , but I find I have few more than say 10 years
old. Aftyer that they are just too ugly and not worth keeping.

Geoff

Jean Lewis wrote:

> Just beautiful all of them Geoff! My vandas have done well for years but
> this year they all look on their last legs! Maybe it's old age like their
> owner.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Zygopetalums.
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

Good evening Jean,

Thanks to your piece about Zygopetalums, I have just made a New Folder and named it: 'Orchid Culture-Tips', and your information regarding them has been given first entry.

I shall definitely follow the instructions and see what happens.

I will also say that the Zygos are the cause of much hair pulling by Orchid enthusiasts the world over.

Thank you, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phal fear
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

interesting! I guess there's not just one "right" way to house phals Sue B

On Thu, Jun 5, 2008

> I just want to show what Phallies can look like after 5 or 6 years
> in the same pot. The 'old' original mixture is still in the bottom
> of the one picture. The other picture shows a smaller pot inside a
> bigger pot. Also with the original mixture in the pot. They seem to
> be happy that way.
> Peter from Bloubergstrand

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Zygopetalums.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Yes I was amazed at the difference it made to our Zygos. My husband tied his to our magnolia tree and it did so well that I then tied a couple of mine there too and they all flowered and kept their leaves. They seem to like swinging in the breeze and they are protected a bit by the branches of the tree and they get dappled sunshine. I have others which get a few hours of morning sun but it was the temperature that seemed to do the trick. − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

I think that cliches it then Geoff − it's definitely old age with my V.Rothchildiana but I have one or two younger ones that are looking a bit ropey too. I'm hoping they'll start to pick up a bit now with brighter days. We'll see. − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] how to make a zyglo-petium (sp) flower?
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Gordon you may see my reply to Roger. We keep some in sun − some morning sun and some tied to a tree where they get dappled sunshine and where they also enjoy the air circulating around them. The temperature seems to be the key thing though. I was keeping them just a bit too warm before and lost all the leaves each year. Now they retain their leaves. Our orchid friend who has wonderful success with them advised leaving them out and only bringing them in when the temp drops below 6C so that's what we did and it worked much to my surprise. I wouldn't have believed they enjoyed being that cold. − Jean

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: 004, 046 (2), 042, 019
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Great photos David. I'm green with envy. How wonderful to live in a place
where orchids grow outside like this!

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From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: 004, 046 (2), 042, 019
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

What a super Harella − much bigger than my plant as evidenced by all those
flowers and spikes. Looks like the same sp. as mine, despite the difference
on the labels.
Of course my plant is probably a young plant , now flowering for only the
second time, but maybe you grow yours better than I do. Any tips ?

Nice Wisteria too , but I prefer them as a climber trained out , rather than
as a bush − mine are mixed up with Lonicera sp., Clematis armandii and
various large flowered Clematis hybrids ( plus the odd rose or two) and
trained along trellis extending the length of my greenhouse, so that oine
thing or another is in flower for a long period; I'm not sure if I ought to
use a hedge clipper or something to reduce the volume and weight on the
timber ! − but that's all off message.

Looks like your Phally is in moss, which is going off a bit − you need to
watch that − the pH can get a bit fierce when that happens.

Nice to see a Cym,devonianum again − we used to see such a lot when Keith
Andrew was in business because he did a lot of lovely cym. hybrids from that
species using several different colour forms. Alas they have not been widely
meristemmed ( if at all) and are rarely available. I'm thinking of things
like Cym Bulbarrow etc − most have South Dorset Downs names. I wonder if
your plant has rather a lot of old backbulbs, not seen in the pic ? Twop
spikes is, as you say, not a lot for this size pot and plant ; maybe another
repot and get rid of all the old rubbish might help.

Geoff

David Martin wrote:

> Here are some recent phographs...
[Snip]

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From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Zygopetalums.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Someone may be able to remind me of his name ; a guy who was Secretary of
Cotswold Orchid Society ( what was) for many years, and was up for an RHS
medal for his orchid growing, until an idiot of a Chairman/President ( not
me − someone who followed me )- told the RHS that he was a professional ( he
was actually a professional estate manager looking after grass and woodlands
more than gardens − and with no responsibility at all for any glasshouse
stuff ) ; orchids were purely a hobby, so it shouldn't have counted-
needless to say he resigned and left the club. Anyway , that guy regularly
showed , maybe still does since I am out of that loop now, zygos with 6,8,10
spikes − in 5 or 6 inch pots.

His technique included standing the pots on capillary matting, and leaving a
tap dribbling water onto the matting. The water − Cotswold stuff − was very
high in lime(scale) and hence calcium, and built up like white slate on the
matting !

But temperatures ? His greenhouse was an ancient wooden glasshouse with the
door left open for much of the year, and I always used to joke about needing
my overcoat when I went into it in the winter.

Geoff

Roger Grier wrote:

> Good evening Jean,

> Thanks to your piece about Zygopetalums, I have just made a New Folder and
> named it: 'Orchid Culture-Tips', and your information regarding them has
> been given first entry.

[Snip]

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From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Phalaenopsis violacea 'Sumatra'
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

A non-hybrid Phalaenopsis :)
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f359/rockhop/IMG_6657c.jpg

Esther
http://www.get.live.com/wl/all

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: David's Phally.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Hi David,

Very nice photos, and I just loved the Wisteria.......don't think it get bloom any better.

As to your Phalaenopsis lamelligera with that unsightly moss at the top of the pot.....and I guess you know what I am going to say next.....why use it???

Cheers Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Phalenatics.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Hi there Jean, and all interested Members,

Just taken some photos, especially to show Jean some of my Phallys growing in the stone medium.

Also a couple of Paphs.

Photo 003. My Garden Centre Paph hybrid, second flower.
Photo 006. Move over, you look tired !!!
Photo 007. Very nice unusual Phally. Asda Supermarket........anyone seen this type?
Photo 010. An add one here. The latest spike has flowers that do not want to open fully.
Photo 011. White Phally growing in my stone medium. No stake. Been in flower for months.
Photo 014. Walked into our conservatory this morning to be greeted by a wonderful perfume........this Phally.
Photo 017. Same Phally showing stone culture, and again no stakes required. Been out for months.
Photo 018. Close shot of the business end.........and Mrs. Blackbird getting into the act !!! Her and her Hubbie are as tame as hell.

Cheers Rocky.

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] how to make a zyglo-petium (sp) flower?
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

6C ! it only gets 12C on the coldest night (in dec) for a few hours! Aghhh! any other Ideas?

Jim

Jean Lewis wrote:

> Gordon you may see my reply to Roger.

[Snip]

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From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] A GOOD DAY ON THE CHALK DOWNS
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Great photos Gavin!
Just showed them to my wife who said "Beautiful! Beautiful!"
I also passed on Geoff's comments about "having to get out his
magnifying glass" and "down on his knees to see them"! She says she
"will smack his legs next time she sees him"!
Joking apart, it is an awful day here in North East Lincolnshire or we
would be going to Cleethorpes (Yes! Cleethorpes!) to see the orchids
there. Lots of variations in shades due to the hybridisation. Maybe get
some pictures next week!

Tony G

"gavin horne" wrote:

> Hello all, i was at a clients house doing some work and finished a
> couple hours early, so i deceided to go and explore the local chalk
> downs.

[Snip]

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From: John J. Rupp
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

The recent talk about Vandas being short-lived reminded me of a recent
discussion, perhaps even on this list, about getting keikis from
Vandas. I believe the discussion went something like taking leggy
Vandas which have a long leggy stem, with no leaves, and orient it
sideways, and this would force it to form keikis along the stem. If
this is correct, it seems like a good way to let an older, well-liked
plant regenerate and continue to give pleasure.

With that thought in mind, I think I must go and lie down for awhile and
see what happens.

John R

Jean Lewis wrote:
> I think that cliches it then Geoff − it's definitely old age with my
> V.Rothchildiana but I have one or two younger ones that are looking a
> bit ropey too. I'm hoping they'll start to pick up a bit now with
> brighter days. We'll see.

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From: PG Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008

No, it's lack of nutrients. Feed them more often with a
balanced fertilizer and probably spray them more often
with water.

Peter from Bloubergstrand
Jean Lewis wrote:

> Just beautiful all of them Geoff! My vandas have done well for
> years but this year they all look on their last legs! Maybe it's
> old age like their owner.

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From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

But do you want a dozen clones of yourself John ?

As to the Vanda technique, I am trying it − for some weeks/months now, but
no obvious keikis yet !

Geoff

John J. Rupp wrote:

> The recent talk about Vandas being short-lived reminded me of a recent
> discussion, perhaps even on this list, about getting keikis from
> Vandas. I believe the discussion went something like taking leggy
> Vandas which have a long leggy stem, with no leaves, and orient it
> sideways, and this would force it to form keikis along the stem. If
> this is correct, it seems like a good way to let an older, well-liked
> plant regenerate and continue to give pleasure.

> With that thought in mind, I think I must go and lie down for awhile and
> see what happens.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] how to make a zyglo-petium (sp) flower?
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

The technique I have been told was used in Southern California to get
cymbidiums to flower ? Water with iced water.

Empty your ice-box, and drink your beer warm !

Geoff

JIM MATEOSKY wrote:

> 6C ! it only gets 12C on the coldest night (in dec) for a few hours! Aghhh!
> any other Ideas?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] A GOOD DAY ON THE CHALK DOWNS
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Thank you so much Tony − I thought my little witticism (?) had gone entirely
un-noticed.

Maybe my lack of enthusiasm is my hundred -year old knees . I was very keen
on the little native orchids once, even considered building a "Mediterranean
house" to grow them in ,in the days before collecting wild plants was
considered not done − in fact it was positively legal. I used to get a
permit from what was then the Ministry of Ag and Fish allowing import of 5
kg of collected plants , when I went walking in the Alps. They gave me a
list of what I couldn't import ( like Berberis sp. ) and the rest was up to
me. I never collected anything which Switzerland had on their "don't
collect" list , and never collected anything unless it was locally common -
and never collected anything unless I was sure that I had the right
conditions − limestone scree plants were not on my list for example. I never
even tried to collect orchids.
But in those days I could kneel down without a thought, and get up again
without a groan .
Different now !

Geoff

tony garthwaite

> Great photos Gavin!
> Just showed them to my wife who said "Beautiful! Beautiful!"
> I also passed on Geoff's comments about "having to get out his
> magnifying glass" and "down on his knees to see them"! She says she
> "will smack his legs next time she sees him"!
[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalenatics.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Photo 010. Our friends at Owslebury have sold a meristemmed hybrid very
close indeed to the one "which doesn't want to open fully" − explaining that
" it is a different type. I grew it for a few years, and never had a flower
open flat, at all, so clearly ( like it or not) it was "intended"

geoff

Roger Grier wrote:

> Hi there Jean, and all interested Members,

> Just taken some photos, especially to show Jean some of my Phallys growing
> in the stone medium.

> Also a couple of Paphs.

> Photo 010. An add one here. The latest spike has flowers that do not want
> to open fully.

[Snip]

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: geoff hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: off message re intrusions.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Has anyone else noticed that the amount of phishing mail has gone up several
hundred percent ? I'm getting two or three a day − often from "banks" where
I have never had an account. Needless to say they are deleted unopened,
ignoring statements that my account may be at risk unless I reply.

However I am in another discussion group ( Royal Photo Soc. Digital Group)
where our web-site was badly compromised so that the forums would not run or
pictures display , and in fact has had to be abandoned and a new one created
with up-to-date provisions , and we had thought that our private e-mail
addresses would have been taken, which may be the reason.

But would be interested to hgear any reactions to all this.

geoff

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalenatics.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Thanks so much for the photos Roger. I can see how well they are doing. It looks as though they are standing in a small amount of water − are they?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Orchid portraits (3) − some you'll know, others maybe not...
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

lol I think I might try that John − the orchid and it's owner! − Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sue Brinsko
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Phalenatics.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Stunning blooms, Rocky, how long has the yellow phal been in the same
pot? Your clay pots are very like the Italian ones I saw here, except that
the Italian ones had larger side holes, in an oblong or slit type
shape......appeared that the holes were made when the clay was still wet,
not drilled in after drying. Sue B

On Sat, Jun 7, 2008
wrote:

> Hi there Jean, and all interested Members,
>
> Just taken some photos, especially to show Jean some of my Phallys growing
> in the stone medium.

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] David's Phally.
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Hello Rocky,
I grow some of my Phal species in solid Sphagnum because by trial and error they seem to like it. Also part of the pleasure I get from growing orchids is to grow them as naturally as possible. I have yet to see pots of Seramis and gravel screwed on trees in the jungle!. There again I haven't been in the jungle recently.!! I can always cover the top of the pot with gravel then you can't pull my leg in future!!!!!!!
The wisteria has been growing on the river bank for at least 30 years. It was blown down in a storm a few years ago and the Council wanted to remove it. There was such a fuss from all the residents that they got a specialist from Meristwood to advise about saving it. See how the tow path has been diverted around it. It's a sight we look forward to seeing every year.
David

Roger Grier wrote:

> Hi David,

> Very nice photos, and I just loved the Wisteria.......don't think
> it get bloom any better.

> As to your Phalaenopsis lamelligera with that unsightly moss at the
> top of the pot.....and I guess you know what I am going to say
> next.....why use it???

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From: David Martin
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: 004, 046 (2), 042, 019
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Geoff,
I have had Haraella odorata/ Haraella retrocalla, it's the same plant, since
Nov 2000, it has 16 leaves still on the plant, so some are very old.
It has to put up with my Phals conditions, so the temperature is Min 21, and
Max up to 35. It lives hanging up near the apex of the greenhouse in quite
bright light. A good solid shadow is cast by my hand. It's as moist as I can
get it without resorting to a fogging unit. 100% in the morning reducing to
80% on most days unless its very hot, then of course as the temp rises the
humidity falls, but no lower than 60%. I spray every morning with weak
fertilizer, 100-200 microsiemens. Occasional drenches with rain water.

The phal is in moss, but it's only the top covered in algae, as under the
surface it's a nice normal brown colour. The species like it quite bright.

I agree about Cym devonianum, I think I will have to repot it. All the books
warn about repotting devonianum, I have proven that they don't like it.
There's some old pseudo bulbs in the centre but a nice group of about six
large ones to one side. I will take those off and plant them. The rest can
be separated into small groups. The spikes have just been finished so it's
the next job.
David

"geoff hands" wrote:

> What a super Harella − much bigger than my plant as evidenced by
> all those flowers and spikes. Looks like the same sp. as mine,
> despite the difference on the labels. Of course my plant is
> probably a young plant , now flowering for only the second time,
> but maybe you grow yours better than I do. Any tips ?
>
> Looks like your Phally is in moss, which is going off a bit − you
> need to watch that − the pH can get a bit fierce when that happens.
>
> Nice to see a Cym,devonianum again − we used to see such a lot when
> Keith Andrew was in business because he did a lot of lovely cym.
> hybrids from that species using several different colour forms.
> Alas they have not been widely meristemmed ( if at all) and are
> rarely available. I'm thinking of things like Cym Bulbarrow etc -
> most have South Dorset Downs names. I wonder if your plant has
> rather a lot of old backbulbs, not seen in the pic ? Twop spikes
> is, as you say, not a lot for this size pot and plant ; maybe
> another repot and get rid of all the old rubbish might help.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: rudolf günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Dendro and Phalaenopsis'
Date: Sat, 07 Jun 2008

Hello all,

Here are some pictures of (non Paphs) orchids which are flowering / flowered
in my collection in 2008.
Dendrobium lindleyi (formerly D. aggregatum) flowers reliably in spring when
it had a cool and dry resting period during winter.
Phal. bellina f. murtoniana (formerly P. violacea 'Borneo') is flowering for
the first time in my collection.
Last but not least − Phal. schilleriana was already in flower in January/
February but there wasn't the right occasion to send the picture by now.
I grow all in pure hydroculture, no flood and drain. That means permanently
water inside the pot and the water level varies in a range between 3 and 4
cm.
@ Sue
Due to hydrocultue and the fact that I use an inorganic potting medium
without decaying, rotting or porosity there is no need for repotting as long
as the pot is big enough for the plant. The Dendrobium for instance grows in
this pot already since 5 years. Repotting is always stress for a plant and
should be done only when really necessary.
@ Esther
It's nice to see your Phal violacea 'Sumatra' for comparison. I intended to
send this mail the whole week but didn't it so far. Well, today I saw the
beautiful flowers of your violacea and in the end here it is.
I use the new plant-names although I'm more familiar with the older ones.

Best regards from Germany, rudolf

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