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2008 Archived Messages


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Links to all the Photos and other images accompanying the list messages can be found on the Images page.

MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-29
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

February 1—7

From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: mail
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: rumor has it reclassification going on in the Cattleya family
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

Hi,

I heard some rumor that they are talking about a reclassification of Brazilian laelias ( at the Miami Show), any news on this?

Thanks,

Jim

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From: jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

Hi Rocky et al,

I've really no idea why the Phallys are doing so well in see through pots except as I said before the amount of light they get. I used to grow some of them in long Tom pots which took care of the wobbling factor. Now I use large clear plastic pots and I find I'm increasing on the look out for larger ones still as they are growing at a rate I've not seen before. It's just one of those things I guess and as always depends on everything else − location, heat, light and humidy etc. As sec of our local society I honestly think I've tried about every medium known to man over the years and am always willing to try new things but when I find something doing this well I'm sticking − for a while anyway:) − Jean

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: mail
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

Jim, I'm guessing the blank message was meant to be a request to subscribe
to the List since you have unsubscribed from the Digest, so have transferred
you. Hope that's OK :-)

Regards,

--

Tricia

Even a blind squirrel finds a nut sometimes.

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From: Tim
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: mail
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

can you tell me how to unsubscribe?
Tim

"Tricia Garner" wrote:
> Jim, I'm guessing the blank message was meant to be a request to
> subscribe to the List...

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: mail
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

Oh bother, that message to Jim was meant for him only − it's been one of
those days!

I used to add instructions for unsubscribing to the bottom of the messages,
but some ISPs (particularly Comcast who are un-cooperative at the best of
times) won't accept it unless the emails are plain text without any HTML.

If you examine the headers you will see I put it there instead. Basically,
send an email with unsubscribe or signoff in the Subject line to the usual
address.

Best wishes,

Tricia

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

Plested Orchids have had relatively clear pots in sizes from about 2.5 inch up to 7 or 8 inch on their stand at the last BPS day I went to in the summer 07. Presumably will supply by post.

geoff

jean Lewis wrote on 01 February 2008:
[RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008

> Hi Rocky et al,

> I've really no idea why the Phallys are doing so well in see through pots
> except as I said before the amount of light they get. I used to grow some
> of them in long Tom pots which took care of the wobbling factor. Now I
> use large clear plastic pots and I find I'm increasing on the look out
> for larger ones still as they are growing at a rate I've not seen before.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: mail
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2008

yes I want to see the photos. I assume this is the only way.

Jim

Tricia Garner wrote:

> Jim, I'm guessing this was meant to be a request to subscribe to the List...

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: mail
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2008

Yes, it's the only way to see them promptly. I think they are handy for
reference on the website, but by the time they get put on there most folks
have forgotten the original context.

Tricia

On 01 Feb, JIM MATEOSKY wrote:
> yes I want to see the photos. I assume this is the only way.

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2008

Plant pots which are clear, ranging from opaque to virtually transparent
are available in small to large sizes from many sources in the UK,
including Plested Orchids, Ratcliffe Orchids, Laurence Hobbs Orchids, Peter
White and Burnham Nurseries.

I use them for my Phals, which do seem to like them. As I see it they are
not however suitable for semi-hydroponic culture as they all have holes in
the bottom. What I am looking for are plastic containers around 5-inch and
7-inch diameter *with no holes* so I can make holes in them where I want
them. It isn't clear on the site which Jean kindly mentioned whether their
pots have holes or not.

--

Tricia

I took a course in speed waiting. Now I can wait an hour in just ten minutes...

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From: jean Lewis
Subject: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2008
Source: mail

Thanks Geoff. I like dealing with Ratcliffe. I've just had some bark from them and they seem reasonable, quick and efficient. I'll have a look at the pots. I find I can buy transparent ones from Harold Horticulture and they are reasonable and efficient too. The beauty with their pots is that they have plenty of holes around the whole bottom edge of the pot while the translucent ones only have either two or four and on trying to make more I have split the pot several times. If anyone is interested in clear pots have a look here:

http://www.harrodhorticultural.com/HarrodSite/pages/product/product.asp?prodGPR-191&ctgryGreenhouse+Equipment%5FPotting+and+Timber+Potting&searchtrue&cookie%5Ftest1

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From: Gordon Walker
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Fwd: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2008

Jean,
I use an electric soldering iron and make holes all the way up and down and round the pots also on the bottom. It doesn't take more than a few minutes to make the holes. Watch the fumes however.
Gordon.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] rumor has it reclassification going on in the Cattleya family
Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2008

Hello Jim,

I am very interested in what you here. One because I grow my epiphytes in stone chippings, and two because I wonder if they are thinking about the true lithophytes that grow on the smooth rock formations.

I will keep my eyes very wide open.

Regards, Rocky.

P.S. Any talk about CITES and how they have it so wrong on some aspects of trading non-endangered orchids.

JIM MATEOSKY wrote on Friday, February 01:

> I heard some rumor that they are talking about a reclassification of
> Brazilian laelias ( at the Miami Show), any news on this?

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: making holes
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

Jean,

We use a 1/2 inch metal pipe heated over a fire ( my BBQ grill) get it good and hot and we put 10-15 holes in the sides and bottom. I like the larger holes it provides more airmovement.

Jim

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Nice paph.
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

No more to say, is there ?

geoff

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Name, anyone ?
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

Any suggestions ( of a name ! ) for this orchid will be appreciated

geoff

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Good Coelogyne-
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

My plant , currrently in an about 15 inch saucer has 30+ spikes.

Very similar to C. cristata , but maybe a month earlier for me − this year -
at least.

I'd like to take it into the house, but its too big for most sites ; the
usual one for large plants or arrangements, is my hall table, currently
full of a very large jug of mimosa ( which here grows so fast and so large
that I fear it will have to go − it's that or the house ! ) So I cut and cut
, but you can't see where from- but this is of course not an orchid so I'll
say no more.

Geoff.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: transparent pots
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

Paphs grow in them too − very well in fact. Here's some pics of my P.Marilyn
Hansen , one of which shows the roots coming out through the bottom. It's
rooting so well that I wonder if at last I shall actually flower this plant
, which is a real b****** in this respect. In fact I've never seen it
flowered by an amateur ; the only three times I have seen it in flower were
on sales displays , and I always bought those plants, but not flowered them
again. I've tried them everywhere − as you can see from one of the pics,
I've even hung them up with the Vandas !

Any suggestions from anyone who has flowered Marylyn Hansen will be very
much appreciated.

geoff

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Holes in pots.
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

Hi all,

As my 'Subject' says; 'Holes in Pots'. So, are some of you beginning to see the light ??? No doubt the 'Boss' will clip me round the ears for that pun when we next meet up!!!

But in truth, I do hope that many of you orchid growers will begin to see that holes in pots can be a very good thing.

Let's face it, in bygone years, all of the clay pots had holes in them, and how smart they looked.

Some of you may remember the image that I posted from an old book showing just the type of pots that were used. And again I tell you that in Malaysia and other parts of the 'East' they still have them. Also in the Caribbean and in the United States.

Question for Jean and Jim..........have you ever thought of buying a couple of the clay pots that are found so easily in Garden Centres these days and drilling holes in them? I ask this question because if you do give it a try I am sure that you will find them a better home for your orchids than plastic pots.

I will await your answers..........or maybe another clip round the ear!!!

Kind regards, Roger.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Coelogyne mossiae
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2008

By a coincidence , shortly after posting my pic, I sat down to start going
through a pile of journals which have been piling up on my coffee table, and
soon came to Orchid Digest − the Jan-Mar 2008
a piece on this species.

Eric Christensen, writing the piece, says that all the C.mossiae which is
about are in fact C.Unchained Melody , and the true C.mossiae − a rare plant
in Burma , is perhaps not in cultivation at all. He shows a drawing of
C.mossiae when first introduced, but those old Gardeners Chronicle woodcuts
always show almost idealised flowers with little resemblance to ones I have
seen ,and the drawing (unsurprisingly) does not bear much resemblance at all
to my plant.

Unchained melody is said to be C.cristata x C.flaccida ; if so , it is a
puzzle where the C.flaccida colour went in the hybrid. Christensen says that
in other genera white in one parent suppresses colour in the other. This is
true in Paphs , where using niveum is a fair basis for a white hybrid () and
for a very small one too , since niveum is no giant ) but not often
elsewhere ; in fact in Vandas it is the other way round − white is
suppressed , but I suppose it depends on why white e.g. is it an albino
form, or the normal colour. However this is all speculation.

But the Christensen theory sounds a bit far-fetched to me, since it must be
rather unusual for so many hybrids to all look exactly the same with no
variation, especially when I happen to know that the plants in circulation
have been bred by at least three different nurseries − the one in New
Zealand whose name is two letters ( KL ? JL ? something like that ) − they
haven't been seen in Europe for a few years, more's the pity, also by Carter
& Holmes in USA , and by one of the German nurseries .

Geoff

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From: Jean-Claude GEORGE
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coelogyne mossiae
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

Hi Geoff,
I've just received the review, almost at the same moment as you mail on my computer ! I must admit that I totally agree to what Christenson says about most cristata hybrids seen at the momemt being "Unchained Melody". We have a lot of them in flower at the moment, bought a long time ago as C.albina from India. Those ones are very pale yellow coloured, but I've seen other ones rather dark yellow, almost orange. We also recently flowered a very pale yellow C.flaccida (photo enclosed) that could be the parent, giving a very clear colour to the hybrid.
The division we got last year from your plant,( the one you posted on the list today?) in flower at the moment seems to me from a different parent, perhaps could it be what Christenson calls C.Noel Wilson ? I'll write him to know more and keep the list informed whe I get an answer
Elisabeth

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From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Good Coelogyne-
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

As far as I am concerned this C. mossiae story has been rumbling on for about 4 years. I am not a ''Plant Ologist' but if a primary hybrid is self pollinated do they all resemble the parent? Inthe animal kingdom AB xAB gives A + B + AB . Does this not happen in plants? It seems to me that to have so many around they have either been mericloned or the Coel. mossiae that we have is a species. When mine flowers this year I will self it .
Regards Dennis

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Holes in pots.
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

The one thing which is different in countries in the Far East where they use
clay pots , is the compost.

It is ( arguably ! ) economic to fly orchid plants around the world, but no
way is it economic to fly compost − especially in the sort of quantities
needed by large commercial operations.

When you are used to your 20 x 10 (feet, not metres) greenhouse, which you
think is a pretty good size, and if you have not visited one of the large
operations, it must be difficult for you to realise what is needed − one
cut-flower dendrobium nursery I can think of near Bangkok, exports 4 tons of
flowers each month, and has 1200 benches growing the plants , each perhaps
15 metres long.; they grow in green coconuts − the chop off one end, and
drop a plug in − I expect its not as simple as that really ( although I know
coconut milk is an accepted additive to seedling flasks) . Their coconuts
are delivered by the railway truck load..they don't use pots at all ! And
even with labour at pence per hour, they would , I think, have better things
to do with their time than drill holes in perfectly good clay pots !

Holey pots were invented by the Victorians, using a kind of peat as compost,
no longer seen , where the peat is in lumps the size of a walnut (shell) and
as hard as nails . To provide sufficient water it almost needed a grower
standing there with a watering can , pouring non-stop. Hence the holes to
give them a chance to dry out.

Nurseries have to use material which is available locally. The places where
clay pots are used do not have e.g. Douglas fir bark !

I suspect that they use clay because plastic pots would not suit their
potting material.

I think that what I am trying to say is that the pot ain't important, on its
own. Neither are the holes ( have you ever tried growing in holes − no pot
? It works , if you can water often enough..)

The compost ain't important , on its own. They are both parts of a complete
growing system which will include matters of watering frequency, humidity,
and everything else. The holistic approach !

Of course, if it really turns you on to drill holes in pots , why − be my
guest as they say ( but not with my pots, thank you )

Geoff

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From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coelogyne mossiae
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

`morning Geoff,

You may wish to confer with Malcolm Perry on this issue, too. The
story actually is more complicated, with elements deciphered by David
Banks (1995, Australian Orchid Review, 60(2): 47) and Clayton (1998,
The Orchid Review, 106: 39; 1999, The Orchid Review 107:154). Dudley
also reiterated the situation in his book, p. 237. Briefly, Banks is
of the opinion that the hybrid C. cristata x C. flaccida is a natural
one and has been in the horticultural trade for many years under the
unpublished names of C. intermedia [not to be confused with Coel.
Intermedia] and C. granulosa. He made the hybrid Unchained Melody
using C. cristata var. lemoniana, which gives that nice pale yellow
band across the base of the lip. The name Unchained Melody was
applied not only to his own hybrid but also the plants marketed under
C. intermedia or C. granulosa.

Only last evening did I receive a photograph from Russell Hutton, L&R
Orchids, of what is known in New Zealand as C. mossiae. This plant is
clearly Coel. Unchained Melody. Mr. Hutton also noted that he had
received one plant years ago from Andy Easton, who originated Coel.
Noel Wilson which as registered has C. mossiae as a parent. It is
beginning to be evident that Easton may have actually used Unchained
Melody rather than the true C. mossiae, but more investigation is
needed [This is one of the little problems that Malcolm Perry and I
have joined efforts upon.] I should note that in an e-mail to me Andy
Easton admits to an inadequate recollection after 25 years of which
"C. mossiae" he actually used.

Of the numerous plants that I have seen in the U.S., and by
photographs from Japan, Europe, and elsewhere, of ostensible C.
mossiae, almost all have been Unchained Melody. The remainder are
misnamed other hybrids. The Carter & Holmes photo's show Unchained
Melody. In fact, I have four "C. mossiae" in bloom right now in my
greenhouse, all from different `reputable' dealers in the U.S., and
all in fact Unchained Melody. I am supportive of Christenson's
assertion that it is likely that the true C. mossiae is not in the
marketplace for us. If it does occur in public or private
collections, it must be very rare. Malcolm is investigating the plant
growing under that name at the RBG Glasnevin.

Coelogne mossiae is endemic to higher elevation (> 2000m) southern
India, specifically the Nilgiri Hills and Palni Hills, which are
eastern extensions of the Western Ghats. Published and anecdotal
information indicates that this is a very rare species and possibly
extinct over much of its range. Indeed, the original woodcut from The
Gardener's Chronicle and reprinted in Christenson's article is a poor
example of the plant. Most notably the lip is shown in a curled
position, which gives the immediate impression of a suborbicular and
bilobed structure, which is far from the case. The petals and sepals
are proportionately much shorter, wider and acuminate in comparison to
those of unchained Melody or other C. cristata hybrids.

Anyway, sorry to blather along − I am typing this as I have
breakfast. Again, Malcolm might provide considerable information on
his angle of the investigation. If I may, I would like to solicit
information and photos on plants grown as C. mossiae by members of
this discussion group. It would be instructive to survey the extent
of dispersal of such plants to collections and determine which ones
may most resemble the true C. mossiae.

cheers,

Paul

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Name, anyone ?
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

Could it be some sort of robiquetia?

Francis

--- Geoffrey Hands
escribió:

> Any suggestions ( of a name ! ) for this orchid will
> be appreciated

-------------------------------------------------------------

From:
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Coel mossiae
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

here is mine how can we tell?

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Holes in pots.
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2008

Roger,

ha ha ha! here it is a $1.5 for a 7 inch clay pot, a 7 inch plastic pot is $ 0.25 Yes clay is nice, I perfer to grow on "slabs" or pieces of hardwoord, even, old clay roof tiles or hanging baskets. I generally use the plastic pots for "gowing up in" then when it is of nice flowering size I transfer it.

Jim

Roger Grier wrote:

> Question for Jean and Jim..........have you ever thought of buying a
> couple of the clay pots that are found so easily in Garden Centres these
> days and drilling holes in them? I ask this question because if you do
> give it a try I am sure that you will find them a better home for your
> orchids than plastic pots.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean-Claude GEORGE
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coel mossiae
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

I think your plant should be labelled C.Unchained Melody. I enclose a
drawings of C.mossiae, lip expanded, by Kraenzlin (Das Pfanzenreich
1907) and you'll find the type sheet kept at Kew at:
http://apps.kew.org/herbcat/getImage.do?imageBarcode3DK000078671
All the problem lies in the sheet, seems to figure 2 different spikes,
one was added years later....

Elisabeth

Bhotplant wrote:

> here is mine how can we tell?

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coelogyne mossiae
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

My plant did indeed come from L & R, and I have also grown the Carter &
Homes "Mendenhall" clone, which I considered identical.

geoff

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From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: WOC 19 movie
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

Today I put a movie clip on my city blog about the Disa that the South Africans displayed at the WOC.
http://togofcoralgables.blogspot.com/
If you open the site after today, just scroll down for Feb.6 08.
When I get around to it, I will put the movie clips on my site: www.togofcoralgables.com

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Good Coelogyne-
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

That is the classic smooth and wrinkled pea experiment by that old monk (
such is fame , I can't think of his name, but I'll blame senior long periods
, moments would hardly be true ! But what you say was what I had in mind ;
of course it may be that most of the plants in fact come from very few
pollinations. It's not the sort of plant where people are breeding it all
the time I think.

Your notion of selfing etc is excellent ; just one snag as far as I'm
concerned , will I be around d long enough to see the flowers ? .. At my
age, and with my average success rate with seedlings now that I am away for
¼ of the year one place or another, and a jobbing gardener 'looks after' the
orchids, I doubt it ! So I'll leave that to you Denis , which removes
one of the limitations on the possibility.

geoff

Dennis Read wrote:

> As far as I am concerned this C. mossiae story has been rumbling on for
> about 4 years. I am not a ''Plant Ologist' but if a primary hybrid is self
> pollinated do they all resemble the parent? Inthe animal kingdom AB xAB
> gives A + B + AB . Does this not happen in plants? It seems to me that
> to have so many around they have either been mericloned or the Coel.
> mossiae that we have is a species. When mine flowers this year I will self
> it .

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Name, anyone ?
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

Thanks Francis ; a look through Jay's encyc gives R.mooreana pretty well
spot on.

Geoff

francis quesada pallares wrote:

> Could it be some sort of robiquetia?

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From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Geoff's grey cells!
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

Here's a clue Geoff.........Greg--- Men--- !!!

Sorry!!!

Tony

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From: jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

Thanks Jim, Gordon and Rocky. I have thought of drilling holes in clay pots but abandoned that idea years ago! I am not able to drill holes in pots as I haven't anything suitable use to make them and it isn't worth me buying any expensive equipement. I have thought of heat as I used to use a knitting needle heated over a case flame but we have been all electric here for years and unless I can find a suitable source of heat it's a no-no. Thanks for the idea of a soldering iron. I may look into that and if it isn't too expensive that could be the answer. − Jean

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [RE][OrchidTalk] Digest 2008
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2008

Jean, try your local D-I-Y shop. Small soldering irons are not expensive −
I have been using them for years to make extra holes in plastic pots.
Drilling just shatters the pot in my experience.

--

Tricia

A wise old Engineer once said: "Knowledge is knowing where to hit it and experience is knowing how hard!".

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Geoff's grey cells!
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

My first belly laugh of the day . couldn't be Mendel − that's not a name,
it's the word in genetics.

Ah well − senior moments do have their moments, I find !

Geoff

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From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Geoff's grey cells!
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

I wonder if that is why we use the term "GM crops".......in memory of
that scientific monk?

OK! last word on the subject from me!

Tony

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] those little numbers which suddenly start appearing in our messages...
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

I think I've sussed it.

's means " this line has been scanned by big brother and has not been
found subversive" , alternatively it means apostrophe.

probably means " we are not sure about this one"...."better keep
watching !" − I haven't worked out the alternative yet , but I 's m
working on it.

Geoff

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: cymbidium potting mix
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

Hi gurus,

This is more of a question for the do it yourselfers as I realize there are many really good commercial products available.

I am using coconut "hair" cut in small peices with small chuncks of coco ( biger plants get biger cunnks ).

What works for you all?

Thanks,
Jim

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From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coel mossiae
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

Coelogyne Unchained Melody possesses the classic sinuous and sexy form
of C. cristata, and that bright white color is typically with
crystalline reflections. Notice that the petals and sepals are
proportionately long and tapering to evenly rounded tips. On
Unchained Melody the petals are often flattened lengthwise as is
yours, but many also have a twist as shown by the lower sepals on your
plant. The sepals, especially the lower ones, have an lengthwise
obtuse ridge that is counterparted by the lengthwise groove on the
inside face. The flowers are reasonably large, with a healthy average
plant producing a floral spread across the petals of a bit more than
3.0 inches. The lip has that deep, rounded to almost square-cut
constriction at the base of the epichile, with the latter tapering to
a sharp point. The apex of the epichile, however, typically folds
under as yours does, so that in a frontal aspect you get that
appearance of bulging lateral lobes and two-horns on the outer angles
of a cut-off tip; again, just a visual artifact because of the
folding. The three keels are deeply laciniate to fimbriate. The
yellow band across the lip at the constriction varies from a very pale
yellow to luteous, sometimes with hints of orange. This coloration
also extends onto the hypochile, especially the lateral lobes and
slightly darker veining (streaking) can be seen on some plants.

On Feb 5, 2008, at 11:30 AM, Bhotplant@aol.com wrote:

> here is mine how can we tell?
>
>

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From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Tolumnia
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

Hello all,

I've had this equitant for 2 years and this is the first time it is blooming for me!!

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f359/rockhop/IMG_6087b.jpg

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f359/rockhop/IMG_6094b.jpg

cheers,
esther

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Cymbidium compost.
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

Hi there Jim,

You stated that there may be many good commercial composts, or words to that effect. I'm not so sure that there are many good commercial composts. My reasons are private, but ask if you want to.

Your idea of using coconut hair and larger chunks sounds really great to me.

I always think that there is one outright thought when deciding what to use for potting Cymbidiums, and that is..........just think what the inside of the pot will look like a few years up the road. And it's then that the plant will need re-potting. The coco mix that you speak of would not be difficult to prize apart/hack off/slice up with a large knife, or cut with a saw.

To me, that's what a good Cymbidium compost is all about.

Anybody agree ???

Rocky.

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From:
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Coel mossiae
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

many thanks

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From: tony garthwaite
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Geoff's grey cells!
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

Oh! the other famous scientific monk was a chap named Dom Perignon.
Shame I didn't know him personally!!

Hic!

Over and out.........promise this time!
Tony

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From: Max Redman
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] cymbidium potting mix
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

Hi Jim,
Out here in Sydney area we are mostly using coconut for repotting cymbidiums. There are a number who use a mix with the coconut including stone and different grades of bark.
The growth rate seems to be excellent and the cost is much less than using various commercial mixes.
I personally am using mainly coconut in different grades for almost everything and that means about 3500 plants . There are still about 1000 that will need repotting into various mixes.
Max.

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From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Geoff's grey cells!
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2008

I'll bet Geoff did!
John

"tony garthwaite" wrote:

> Oh! the other famous scientific monk was a chap named Dom Perignon.
> Shame I didn't know him personally!!

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