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2006 Archived Messages


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Links to all the Photos and other images accompanying the list messages can be found on the Images page.

MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

December 15—21

From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: STENOGLOTTIS longifolia
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 15:50

I bought STENOGLOTTIS longifolia last May and it has done very well with lots of spikes. It is now dying back and I am not sure what needs to happen as I am unfamiliar with its growth rhythm,. Any advice gratefully received

Andy

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Paphiopedilum Colorkulii
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 16:00

This is my first flowering of Paphiopedilum Colorkulii ( sukhakulii X concolor) I rather like it and hope I can get it to clump up − A pot with several of these would be rather nice

Andy

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cycnodes/Cycnoches/Mormodes/Catasetum
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 16:05

I have been looking at my cycnodes today. A lovely fan of leaves and two spikes with nearly 40 flowers. I think I am going to do the same this year as last That is let it dry after flowering and do not water until the new growth is at least a few cm tall next spring.

On the subject of resting or not however, I never rest my cattleyas and they do not seem to suffer. Quite the opposite in fact.

Andy

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] orchids
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 16:10

Whatever you want to call this it is really something. Can we see a photo of the plant and flowers?

Andy

P G Hieke wrote:

here is a picture of the first time flowering of
Vanda lilacina (Syn: V. laotica).
Andy

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From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cycnodes/Cycnoches/Mormodes/Catasetum
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 18:45

Hi Andy: Will you stop watering now or wait until the flowers die? If you wait, then what will you do if new growths begin?
Sharon

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Plant wanted.
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 22:05

Hi Rocky

This is available from Grossraschener in Germany. I have bought from them before and had good plants and service. Here is a link:

http://www.orchideenwlodarczyk.de/shop/catalog/product_info.php?products_id553&osCsiddd45436121c9d54824c119e2d4bd5330

Andy

Roger Grier wrote:

Peter has got me to definitely go for another Rhynchostylis retusa, or one of the Genus, so where can I buy one?

Does anyone in the U.K. or Europe know where I can buy a good plant.

Thanks, Rocky.

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cycnodes/Cycnoches/Mormodes/Catasetum
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2006 22:35

Hi Sharon

I will stop now. I do not think it will start new growths now with the lower light and lots of flowers. It didn't last year til about April as I recall.

Andy

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From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] STENOGLOTTIS longifolia
Date: Sat, 16 Dec 2006 06:55

Reduce watering, but do not let it dry out completely. Just keep
the mixture barely damp. Remove all yellowing leaves and twist
out the dry inflorescenses. When everything has disappeared, just
wait for the new green tips appearing and then water and fertilize
until the plant is in flower again, which will be in autumn.
Rotate the plant by 1/3 turn every week to ensure even flowers
around the inflorescense. If you don't do it then the flowers
will look all in one direction, towards the light.
When it becomes crowded in the pot, then remove all the tubers
and plant in fresh mixture. This will set the plant back for one
season with fewer flowers. Thats all.
Attached is a picture of my plant which was Best SA Species at the
Autumn Show this year.
Kind regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

Andy Mckeown wrote:

I bought STENOGLOTTIS longifolia last May and it has done very well with lots of spikes. It is now dying back and I am not sure what needs to happen as I am unfamiliar with its growth rhythm,. Any advice gratefully received

Andy

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] STENOGLOTTIS longifolia
Date: Sat, 16 Dec 2006 09:30

Hi Andy,

I also bought this plant for the first time this year,
and did very well with it... As I got two spikes to
grow on the plant. One of my orchid books say 'after
the flowers fade, the above-ground body parts die,
which is why the plant should be wintered in a cool
and dry environment'. I'm not sure how cool and dry it
needs to be though, but it is native to the
semi-deserts of South Africa.

I would also appreciate any extra advice, as my
plant's leaves are all now looking brown and manky!

Francis.

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From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Peterborough
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 15:05

The attached flyer has just been sent to me. I think Don Smallman and his team need all the support we can give after the way The Newbury Show treated him and us.
Regards from a sunny and not too cold Devon

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Peter's fertiliser
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 16:50

Hello Peter,

It took a little while until I've got the time to write my response. But
in my view I've got to contradict your statement (see below).
Plants take in feed/nutrients from outside in their roots by osmosis and
transport all their saps from bottom (roots) to the top by osmotic
pressure (please see more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osmosis).
Osmosis is the movement of a solution through a selective permeable
membrane from a region of low solute potential to a region of high
solute potential. In this case ALL compounds (ions) of the solution with
lower potential (potting medium) move through the selective permeable
membrane (skin of the root) into the solution with higher potential (sap
inside the root) as long as there is a gradient in concentration. As
soon as a balance is reached the movement ceases.
The plant is unable to pick out distinct ingredients of the solution -
it happens by the principle − ALL OR NOTHING (except molecules that are
too big for the openings of the membrane)!!
Due to this knowledge it is necessary to create different fertilizers
for different purposes (blooming/flowering etc) because the plant needs
different nutrients in different stages of growing (if you want to
provide your plant optimally). It is unable to pick out what it needs.
The other extreme is − the concentration of the outside solution is
higher than inside the roots. Than the osmosis system reverses and the
root withers.
Most orchid growers say the roots rot but this is secondary in case of
too high nutrients concentration − primary it is withering because of
reverse osmosis.
That's the reason why we should measure (sometimes) the electrical
conductivity of the water we use for plants watering. The EC is a marker
of the salt concentration within the solution (water).

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf

Peter wrote:

...we cannot feed the orchids. We can only provide the ingredients and
the plants decide what they want to use from it, with other words, they
cook their own meal. If the plant does not want any phosphorous then it
stays in the pot unused and over time could harm the plant. So, it is
always important to flush out with clean water inbetween.
Kind regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cycnodes/Cycnoches/Mormodes/Catasetum
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 17:10

Hello Sharon,

I grow two Catasetums indoor and both of them in pure hydroculture. The
level of the nutrients solution (water) is permanently about 4-5 cm
high.
I act by the principle − THE PLANT SHOWS ME what to do.
They get water as long their leaves are green. As soon the first leaves
turn to yellow I don't water again and when the last leaf has fallen
down I throw away the remaining water and keep the plant dry until new
growths emerge in spring.
Then I fill in new solution and the circle starts again.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf.

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Merry X-mas and some Paphs photos
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 17:35

Hello everybody,

I wish you all Merry X-mas − if Christians or not.
I attach some photos of recently flowering Paphs (the last ones in 2006)
to avoid that purists raise their fingers and say `this is not an orchid
topic`. :-) :-)
Also I wish everybody a successful, happy and especially healthy New
Year 2007.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf.

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From: Tina Stagg
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: Bowl full of Westland Orchid compost, Westland Orchid compost
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 22:00

I find Westland orchid compost quite useful. For the past two years I have been adding a handful or two to (mostly) inert composts to 'provide a bit of meat in the sandwich'.

For instance, lycastes and idas get it with perlite and moss, pleiones get it to 'firm up' small bark so that the fine roots can take hold and zygos, together with their hybrids, get a small amount with the leftover odds and ends they tend get potted in − usually foam, coco chips or Rockwool cubes. In other words, I use it for orchids that are potted annually.

I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner though!

Tina

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From: Tina Stagg
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Christmas greenfly
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2006 22:10

One of my greenhouses has accommodated a few greenfly, or greenflies if you prefer, since it was built. I don't get them in the other two − no idea why not.

I used to use smokes but these have been Maffed so are no longer obtainable. I don't like Provado because I find that I cannot get the spray fine enough to avoid damage to new leaves.

The problem manifests itself on some new budding spikes. Today the ornithorhyncum spikes were infested. There were too many to rub off without rubbing off all the buds so I held the spikes under water for two minutes each. I will find out later in the week if this has been successful.

The question is − does anybody know for how long an underwater greenfly can hold its breath?

While you ponder this, or experiment, I will wish everybody a very Happy Christmas and get back to my present wrapping.

Tina

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From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 04:05

Hello Rudolf,

You mentioned growing Catasetums in hydroculture. May I know what you pot
the bulbs in? Is it perlite?

cheers,
esther

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Westland Orchid Compost.
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 10:20

Mornin'Tina,

From a very wet and damp New Forest, with no sunshine. Looking after our orchids in this typical British weather at this time of year does take a bit more care than normal.

Anyhow down to brass tacks.

The Westland so named 'Orchid Compost' together with the others that have shown their ugly heads over the past few years should be re-named to tell the newcomers to orchid growing that they know absolutely nothing about how epiphytic orchids grow.

I am on very good terms with a person who is the boss of a very large Garden Centre. Of course they sell it. It's a business, but this person and I agree about many things. Say no more.

Recently, just this week I took a clear plastic pot and filled it with the 'Westland' product, as I did with the 'Others'. Then I poured a pint of water through it, catching what went through in a glass jar.

The collected water was BLACK and contained very small particles. It is this that clogs the wonderful honeycombed structure of the orchid root.

I agree with you entirely about using such a compost for Pleiones and maybe Lycastes.

Ever wondered why the bark of pine and fir trees was thrust upon us???

Kind regards, Rocky.

P.S. Why is your E-mail coming to me in that strange fashion???

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Where to advertise in the "Euro landia" for our Costa Rica Orchids
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 11:55

Hi all,

I realize this is a off topic question, but in the end I think it will be something that will intrest many of you. I have a lab in Costa Rica and have been collecting native species (and making some crosses). We just got permission ( a rubber stamp of sorts) to export our Lab grown plants. We are starting to aclimatate a many of them now.

My question is this in the US The American Orchid Society Magazine is one really good place to advertize. Is there a magazine (s) or Website (s) with a similar following in Europe?

Thanks,

Jim Mateosky

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From: J Morgan-Davies
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 12:20

Hi All,

We find Seramis works really well for our Catasetums, Cycnoches etc smaller
grain size will hold water better than either perlite and/or larger
hydroton/leca.

Justin
PS. Happy Christmas all.

"Esther Koh" wrote on Mon, 18 Dec 2006

>Hello Rudolf,
>
>You mentioned growing Catasetums in hydroculture. May I know what you pot
>the bulbs in? Is it perlite?

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From: Tina Stagg
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: PS
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 15:30

Does anybody know why my perfectly straightforward and coherent messages have been translated into geekspeak by Antispam?

Tina

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: PS
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 17:35

On 18 Dec, Tina Stagg wrote:

> Does anybody know why my perfectly straightforward and coherent messages
> have been translated into geekspeak by Antispam?

Try sending in plain text rather than HTML.

Regards,

--

Tricia

A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.

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From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Westland Orchid Compost.
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 18:00

Being short of memory cells I can't be positive but I seem to recall that we went around the hieroglyphics circuit when Geoff was sending us all ""s and stuff a while back. I Think Tricia evntually came up with the magical solution of plain text. I note that you seem to be similarly afflicted Roger! Clearly (or less than clearly!) Tina is receiving her own mail "corrected". Some of us seem to suffer this problem, others don't. I wonder why? Anyway it doesn't seem to get in the way of understanding the messages).
John

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 20:25

Hello Esther,

I don't use Perlite as potting medium at all.
I grow my Paphs in a mix of Seramis but I would not use it or recommend
it for hydroculture. I think it is the same with Perlite.
Both substances transport water very well and are water retentive. That
means connected with hydroculture the neck of the plants is permanently
wet. From my experience only few (except cloud forest orchids) orchids
can stand that for long.
Orchid roots get used to nearly every environment − even to live
permanently in water − but not the plants bodies.
I grow all my epiphytes in hydroculture (e.g. Angreacums, Catasetums,
Cattleyas, Oncidium, Dendrobiums and Phalaenopsis) and I use cut
Styrofoam as potting medium.
It sounds strange but it works (see attached photos).
The advantages are:
- It is an absolute inert material
- Lasts for ages not to say till eternity unless you don't heat it too
much
- It transports only little moisture to the plant neck / body
- It is warm − it doesn't cool down by evaporation of water
I cover it with a layer of pebbles − looks better than the white stuff
and increases the weight so it doesn't swim / float.
It's made from a kind of insulation wall paper you can buy here in
Germany. The thickness is 2 or 4 mm and I cut it on a paper shredder
(width of the cut 2 mm).

@ Rocky

Hello Rocky,
As you can see in the attached photo − my Catasetum fimbriatum errects
its roots upwards in the same way as that one you photographed in the
Caribbean in spring 2006.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf.

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From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Tue, 19 Dec 2006 04:15

Hello Rudolf,

Thanks for your informative message and pictures. This is very interesting.
I can't get the thin styrofoam here in Singapore and I don't have a paper
shredder. I can get discarded styrofoam boxes from the supermarket. I think
I'll try breaking that into smaller pieces for potting material. I've never
tried hydroculture before. What do you add to the water?

I just bought a Catasetum fimbriatum a few days ago. It has 3 small bare
bulbs and is potted in sphagnum moss. Should I repot it straight away or
leave it till it shows signs of growth?

I live in tropical Singapore by the way.

Cheers,
esther

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From: Esther Koh
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Tue, 19 Dec 2006 08:00

Hi Justin,

Since the climate here is humid all year round, I think perlite may be too
wet. I am thinking of trying out styrofoam chips or maybe leca.

cheers,
esther

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catasetums.
Date: Tue, 19 Dec 2006 09:15

Mornin' Esther,

From a very still damp and foggy New Forest. Not the sort of weather our orchids want !!!

From what Rudolph said and from what I saw in Mexico, next year, quite early, I am going to fix my Catasetums on to a piece of cork bark.

Then I will tell you all how they progress.

The reason that I am going to do this is because those that I saw in Mexico, and the ones that I saw in Barbados were growing in such a way that the upturned/vertical roots were not impeded in any way by a 'compost'. They could grow without any hindrance.

Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Message format.
Date: Tue, 19 Dec 2006 12:25

Hi Tricia,

What the hell is going on?

Rocky.

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] STENOGLOTTIS longifolia
Date: Tue, 19 Dec 2006 19:45

Thanks Peter for your advice. Yours certainly is really something!

Andy

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Tue, 19 Dec 2006 20:00

Hello Esther,

Usual the season for repotting Catasetums is in spring when the new
growths are emerging. If its bulbs are big enough (what is small in your
sight?) you should keep it in rest and completely dry until new growths
will emerge at the bulbs' side near the bottom.
Then repot it and fill in the nutrient solution. I start with a weak
solution in spring and raise the amount of fertilizer gradually.
But think of the fact − Catasetums are good eaters!! When they are
growing they need much feed − that means fertilizer. They can stand a
much higher concentrated nutrient solution than other orchids. For
instance, I water my Paphs with an EC of 250-300 µS, other orchids are
watered with 600-750 µS and Catasetums get 1200 -1400 µS.
You can use a special fertilizer for hydroculture as well as any other
fertilizer. I use only one fertilizer for all orchids in different
dilutions.
Hydroculture is easy, works well and is convenient.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf.

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From: Dennis Read
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Where to advertise in the "Euro landia" Â for our Costa Rica Orchids
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 15:10

Jim, As far as I'm concerned as it is about orchids it is not off topic. The main orchid magazine is The Orchid Review and can be found at www.rhs.org.uk and search. The address for advertising in the Orchid Review is louise.bowering@rhspublications.co.uk . The other well read magazine is the Orchid Society of G. B. and can be found at www.orchid-society-gb.org.uk and the advertising contact is Jeanette.Beaney@btopenworld.com . As far as I am concerned I order my orchids from S. America by internet and collect at the main shows that they come across to. These are the March RHS show, The BOGA Show in August and The Peterborough Show (Newbury replacement) in June. There may be others in the North but as I live in the South West corner I now do not venture much past the midlands.
Kind regards Dennis Read

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From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 16:35

Hello Rudolf
The catasetum is in a black pot and this is in a ceramic pot.
Does this mean that you use ordinary flower pots and put them
into another container to hold the liquid for hydroculture?
Please confirm or explain.
Kind regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

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From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 16:50

Hi Esther,
styrofoam chips on it's own will only work if you do it in
hydroculture. You can use styrofoam chips mixed with some
shredded sphagnum moss to keep some moisture around
the roots. This works very well. I grow my catasetums
this way.
I would not grow catasetums in pure sphagnum moss, it
holds too much liquid and this will be too wet for the bulbs.
On the other hand you can use anything to grow catasetums,
as long as it holds a balanced quantity of moisture. They
should dry out in between to get air to the roots.
Kind regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

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From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Catasetums
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 16:55

Hi Rocky,
it will work, if you can water, mist or spray them at least once every day.
It is important to make mounted plants really wet once a day, as it encourages
the plant to grow more roots. High humidity does not achieve this. I see this
every year on my plants. As soon as I start watering them every day (after
the winter) the plants produce numerous new roots and then in turn flowers.
Kind regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

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From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Message format.
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:50

On 19 Dec, Roger Grier wrote:

> Hi Tricia,

> What the hell is going on?

I tried a new option in my email software which I hoped would get rid of
the pesky HTML. I have switched it off for now while I consult the author.

--

Tricia

Vital papers will demonstrate their vitality by moving from where you left them to where you can't find them.

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 20:25

Hello Peter,

You are absolute right, in this case I use an ordinary flower pot made
of plastic for potting in the plant and put it into a inside glazed
ceramic pot.
It's important that the brims of both pots fit together as good as
possible to avoid light coming in. As soon as light comes into the
nutrient liquid the problem of algae growing appears.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf

PS: Spezielle Hydrotöpfe sind auch nichts anderes, nur dass sie noch
einen Wasserstandsmesser integriert haben. Aber darauf habe ich hier
verzichtet, da ich den Wasserspiegel durch kurzes anheben des Topfes
sehen kann.

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From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Message format.
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 20:35

Thanks Tricia,
Although my codebreaking is of fair standard, I must admit that words were a
great invention. Thanks for the return to them!
John

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From: WAOS
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 22:35

Hi Rudolf


To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] catasetums in hydroculture
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 05:55

Rudolf, Peter and Rocky,

Thanks for your helpful comments.

My Catasetum fimbriatum's bulbs are each less than 1 inch high and about
half as wide.

I don't have an EC meter, but I may try with a very dilute fertiliser
solution.

I will also try the styrofoam and sphagnum moss mix for normal culture.

I like the idea of using styrofoam chips because they are so readily
available and I'm recycling what would otherwise end up in the trash.

Here, the general practice is to pot orchids in charcoal pieces. This medium
works quite well because it is free draining and has enough weight to keep
the plants upright. I guess that I would have to stake top heavy plants if I
pot them in styrofoam.

cheers,
esther

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Mounted plants.
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 14:40

Hi Peter,

With regard to mounted plants, I completely agree with you. BUT, of course is the treatment that you give them in sunny warn South Africa.

Here in southern England I different type of regime is given to my mounted plants.

I just look at the bare roots that have attached themselves to the cork bark. If the WHOLE of the root is apple green in colour they do not require any more water/moisture, but as soon as the velamen turns to a grey/white colour I know that I can water them again or within a few days.

At least both of our methods work very well. And the plants love it.

Regards, Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Newcomers to orchids.
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 18:55

Hi all,

I always try to give as much help to newcomers as I possibly can, but when I see and read some of the information on the website of 'Easy Orchids' [whoever they are] I am appalled.

I was looking at the illustrations and advise on re-potting a Phalaenopsis.

It tells of: You should remove any dead roots right up to the base of the plant and shorten any broken ones. Yes, quite true. Any overly long aerial roots should also be trimmed back as they will not function in the potting medium and may rot and kill the plant. This is because they have formed an outer skin which is designed to take water from the atmosphere rather than in compost. A complete load of rubbish.

I could pull my hair out, but I won't as I am a bit thin on top, but when are these sort of people going to stop all of this nonsense that they obviously know nothing about.

Without going into the natural common sense answer, can anyone tell me with all honesty what these people are on about?????

It's bad enough having Garden centres sell the rubbish that is labelled 'Orchid Compost'.

I rest my case.

Kind regards, Rocky.

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From: timwalker+tim
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Newcomers to orchids.
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 22:40

Hello

I am new to this list − read the archives and it is all very interesting.
I am also new to Orchids − how is someone who knows nothing (me) meant to
sort the wheat from the chaff? Or perhaps I can rely on all your expertise
and wisdom in the challenging times ahead?

Tim

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From: Ron Newstead
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Emailing: Bowl full of Westland Orchid compost, Westland Orchid compost
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 22:50

Your views on orchid potting material are well known, Roger, but it was
difficult to see, from the pictures, what was so objectionable. Can you
explain what it consisted of?

Ron

Roger Grier wrote on 14 December 2006 :

To all of our U.K. members, and possibly some European members,

About a year or so ago I noticed that yet another company who supplied
various items to Garden Centres had produced an 'Orchid Compost'.

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