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2006 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

January 22—31

From: Anguel Iordanov
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Help with a duying nun orchid
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2006 12:00

Hi Everyone and Happy New Year.

Some time ago I bought this nun orchid. It was doing very well but in the
last few months the plant has almost died, because I didn't have time to
look after it properly.

I would like to save this plant if possible but have no idea where to start
from. Therefore your help is more than appreciated on this. I need to know
the humidity, medium, temperature, sun exposure and so on. Basically
whatever you think is relevant to save this beautiful plant.

The pic Nuns Orchid (Phaius tankervilleae) − 018.JPG is of the actual plant
two years ago. Also the flowers of this variety are highly scented.
Something like vanilla and coffee.

Anyway, I hope to hear from you soon and thank you very much in advance.

Best regards,

Anguel Iordanov

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: B & Q rescue.
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2006 12:45

Hi all,

Last year I rescued this plant from B & Q. It flowered last year, and again this year with five spikes. It was ravaged with red spider mite, but it is now under control and the plant is looking to the future.

It is Odontoglossum Violetta von Holm.

Later I will photograph it with the grey background that I spoke of, but spare time is at a premium at the moment.

Rocky.

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From: JIM MATEOSKY
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: mounting orchids on wood − teak OK?
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2006 12:50

Hi all,

I have some new seedlings, cats, onc, brassia, ondoglossoms, rodriguezia. I want to grow them on pieces of wood. I happen to have some Teak piecs. (and others types as well). Does anyone know if there is any issues with Teak and Orchids growing on them?

Also Any recomendations for which Orchids that like wood mountings more than others.

Any and all Input is appreciated.
Jim

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From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Phaius and mounting orchids
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2006 19:35

Anguel here is a url that gives some information you may find useful: http://www.orchidspecies.com/phaiustankervillii.htm

Jim at one time I grew a few miniature orchids on bark − a tiny orange flowering dendrobium and also some Haerellas − jewel orchids. They were successful for quite a time but had to be sprayed each day. They perished on summer when it was unusually hot here. I know nothing about growing on teak but I feel sure one of our members will know more about this. Good luck with them. Jean

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From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: rescue
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2006 19:35

Beautiful orchid Rocky and quite a success story. Thanks for the photo. Jean

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Dr Lim
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2006 20:20

I find it difficult to understand what went on here ;I read the piece in The
Times which suggested at one point that he made a mistake in completing his
CITES application , copying what his supplier had put on the export permit,
and hence putting a T in a box suggesting he was importing orchids for the
purposes of trade.

Now I have not made an importation ( as far as I can remember) since I went
to Thailand just over 3 years ago , and the system may be different − but I
doubt it , in this respect. If he got a permit, then how come he had his
plants seized ?

The Times illustrated P.rothschildianum and P.sanderianum. A permit would
not have been granted for either of those !

There were said to be over a hundred orchids involved ; rather large numbers
for a personal importation I would have thought ( at least by way of Paph
species) − a 100 Vanda hybrids − well maybe − but it needs a big greenhouse
for these numbers !

Of course we all know that if the seized orchids are still in the possession
of Customs and Excise, they are dead ; and we all complain that this
procedure ( if it is true) makes nonsense of CITES being about saving
endangered species. I did a telephone interview for a horticultural trade
paper about this case , and I made this point quite strongly.

Incidentally, as the holder of the UK National Collection of Paphs I am ( or
at one time was told that I would be ) offered any paphs which had been
seized. In the 15 (?) years I have had the National Collection , the total
number of plants I have been offered is zero...

A few years ago , I had an e-mail from some one talking about buying
P.rothschildianum ( you absolutely cannot have a permit for this − no way -
there are pr0obably less than 100 plants in existence in the wild ( if the
Tourist Board in Kota Kinabulu has not planned another golf course , and
bull-dozed them away ) − which my correspondent said were obtainable, bare
root, jungle collected, from a source in Singapore. Having been told that
Kew would really like to do something about illegal importations, etc., I
e-mailed Dr Cribb and gave him all the details. I never hear anything
officially, but I heard on the grapevine that nothing could be done, because
Singapore has not ratified ( signed up to) CITES so it is not illegal to
sell and export from Singapore.

And the last time I was in Hong Kong = a bit less than 2 years ago , I
visited the flower market , and saw half a dozen paph species on offer -
including the one which is native to Hong Kong , and I would have been
willing to swear on oath that they were wild collected ; but then again , it
is not illegal to collect them ( unless Hong Kong has a National Law against
it, as we have in UK against wild flower plants − don't dig up a bluebell ,
or a primrose − its illegal;) it was just illegal for the dealer to sell
them to me, so that I could bring them home and use them to seed raise a
batch. ( I ddn't buy ; I wasn't tempted − and anywayt , it was thye at the
start of a holiday lasting some weeks, not the at the end , so they would
have been dead when I got home anyway ). But it explains my point that CITES
is a total nonsense.

Of course Dr Lim was importing from Malaysia acording to the story , not
Singapore ; and whatever the truth of it, I wonder how his collection will
fare whilst he does 4 months porridge ? Maybe everything he had to start
with will be dead too − another scalp to CITES ..

I guess that if we had all the facts right we might understand it a bit
better. Ar present, the news item raises more questions than it answers.

Geoffrey Hands

Ps whilst mentioning P.sanderianum − I had a flask a few years ago ; they
have been very difficult to grow ; just starting to get somewhere − and I
wonder what my plants actually are ! They are producing a zig-zag stem with
alternate leaves .almost circular . A recent visitor to the greenhouse said
they looked like a Diaphananthe species .

It would be a curious irony if Dr L. went to pris9on for importing something
labelled as a Paph species , which wasn't , although I doubtr if that would
have been the case.

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From: Dr Chong-Yee Khoo
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sian Lim and CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 00:05

First things first: Big Factual Error. Singapore is a signatory to CITES − no question about it. I know, as I have imported plants from home.

According to http://www.cites.org/eng/disc/parties/index.shtml, Singapore was the 91st country to have signed up − as long ago as 1986!!!!

Now for the conjecture:

My understanding is that Sian Lim did not have a permit for the plants he was caught with − he apparently admitted to the charge of bringing in plants without permit.

However, it appears that he claimed that those plants were not going to be traded (my understanding is that this is no defence − it matters not whether an orchid is to be traded or not, a permit is still needed). Furthermore, it appears that he might even have claimed the he wasn't a trader himself.

However, I know that he has attended several RHS and Newbury Shows as part of the Creative Orchids / Orchid Inn stand, from which he has sold plants. There is some mention in the articles that he tried to distance himself from Creative Orchids / Orchid Inn, saying he was not employed etc by these outfits. When faced with the fact that he had previously been granted permits to import 8000 plants, it seemed that he was claiming that he did not know that these permits had been made for trade imports − that he had ticked the box marked "T" without realising that it stood for "trade".

My personal take on this? [These comments are not specifically directed to Geoff's arguments in his email]

CITES may be imperfect, but it is not a nonsense. It regulates international trade, not trade within borders. The issue of enforcement of local laws against wild-collection clearly affects how effectively the trade as a whole is regulated, but it is not an argument against CITES per se. A four month jail term would I think be a pretty strong deterrent for anyone (trade or otherwise) to smuggle endangered plants. The message from Sian Lim's sentence is clear − don't be tempted.

To me, the argument that we should be allowed to freely import wild orchids, because they are being lost through habitat destruction anyway, is a complete red herring. The threat from habitat destruction is real − but there is absolutely no reason to add to it by allowing wild-collection or free-importation.

The argument that orchid growers in the West can save orchids (usually from an ignorant Third World which doesn't know or care enough to do anything) from extinction by growing them in the greenhouse is equally false. Plants will only thrive and survive as long as the growers do − death, illness or incapacity, loss of interest, lack of time, accidents: loss of power, storm damage, fires, going to jail for four months, etc − all of these can and do lead to collections perishing. I don't think any one of us can guarantee that our plants can survive, let alone thrive, beyond our lifetimes − witness the sad state of collections being put up for auction at orchid societies (usually long after the owner has passed on).

This is not to mention the loss of genetic diversity in captive populations. Once you take an organism out of the wild, you are preventing the generation of this diversity which is so essential for the survival of the population. Any book on basic population genetics will explain this point. I have nothing against setting and growing from seed, even selfings. To me, however, the main benefit of this is to produce plants which can be sold on, reducing pressure on wild-collected versions. We should disabuse ourselves of the romantic notion that we are "saving the orchids" by growing them in our greenhouses.

So, an orchid that only survives in captivity and is not represented by a viable population in the wild is effectively extinct.

My point?

Surely if we care enough about the fate of orchids in the wild, we should focus our energies on activities which have a real chance of saving the plants. Things like campaigning against rainforest destruction, making a donation to Orchid Conservation International, understanding the Convention on Biodiversity, supporting recycling, and making sure wood products come from managed forests. And not buying plants which are wild-collected or which you suspect might be!!

I don't think any of us should be distracted anymore by arguments against an imperfect CITES − which if there was any doubt before this weeks news, IS HERE TO STAY.

Finally, I don't think any of us has a God-given right to grow any orchid we wish. It is merely a privilege. To me that privilege should only be exercised on plants which we can assure ourselves are really artificially propagated, and/or our growing it does in no way contribute to the pressure on wild populations.

Regards to all,

Chong-Yee

P.S. My MP has just resigned over some rather sordid allegations − a bright young thing, but not clever enough to avoid being caught!

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From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: UK National Collections and CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 03:30

Dear Geoffrey,
I was reading through the NCCPG website to learn something of the UK
National Collections of Plants program and was amazed to discover
nothing about that organizations role in dealing with CITES.
Further, I was impressed by the singular lack of itemization of the
benefits gained by the holders of national collections, beyond the
designation as such. Other than a bit of recognition and formal
designation, what do you and other collection holders actually get
out of the program or the NCCPG? Is there any tangible support sent
your way? Do you get a tax rebate for your social generosity? Does
Prince or Princess "X" ever come by and thank you for your efforts,
or exclaim the wonders of the plants for a TV program? Since the
CITES enforcers do not send the suffering plants your way, what is
the role of the national collections in rare species conservation?
All I see on the NCCPG website is an effort to save "garden plants";
so, okay, a nearly extinct artificial variety of a Shasta daisy was
saved, but. . . Why bother with the national collection notoriety?

Along the same lines of plant conservation, what does the RHS do with
regard to CITES? Does it rescue plants from the evil clutches of
bureaucratic functionaries? Does the RHS sit down with anyone to
negotiate UK CITES enforcement policies? Is there a training program
to educate the customs people? Or, is such a lost cause?

In sum, is there any organization that represents UK citizens to the
government agencies that enforce CITES? Is there any sympathy in the
government for making changes in CITES enforcement policies?

Just curious,

Paul

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Help wanted...
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 09:00

I have a problem with scale insects . Its been so since last Summer. At one
time I blamed the local fruit farm ( Pick-your own) which is only a mile
away , and dead down-wind, sow with open vents. But the vents have been
shut for some months now, and plants which were clean before I went away at
Xmas have now got the pests on them, so they are still here and breeding ,
and its not new specimens coming in.

Now I am more inclined to blame Dijon. 20 or 30 of my plants were there, and
rather more than that new plants were bought from at least half a dozen
dealers ( not 180 plants ! − just 1 from this guy, 10 from that , and so on
). And there do appear to be two different types of scale on my plants , if
not three − unless the sexes or growth stages of these things are quite
different looking.

I have sprayed with Provada three times at intervals of months, and also
once I sprayed twice at a 7 day interval , and I am loath to do them too
often since I have Vandas hanging up everywhere, and I have in the past had
a few cases of terminal flower spikes being produced,( blamed on
insecticide) and when that happens, the plant ceases to grow until such
time as it produces a keiki or branch, and it does not flower until that
keiki is big enough − maybe years, Phals do the same thing if sprayed with
some things ( Malathion was well known as a culprit) and they are much more
reluctant to produce keikis − and whilst I don't have phals everywhere in
the house, there are a 100 or so at one end and they too have the pests, so
have to be sprayed or whatever along with everything else..

I try to handle every plant and inspect all parts, at every watering , and
use cotton wool balls or buds and methylated spirits ( wiping alcohol to our
transatlantic friends), to wipe the pests off. But it is not getting any
better , probably the contrary.

The required treatment is really too time consuming to be carried on as the
normal practice so I must find a solution, one way or another.

Any advice ?

Geoff

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From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Chong-Yee
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 09:30

A perfect answer to the Cities argument Chong-Yee, well done and I think it should be published in the Orchid Review − Jean

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] UK National Collections and CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 09:40

Hi Paul ; you are right , the actual value to a collection holder such as
myself is nil − indeed, the contrary .

However, most of the 600 + Collections − remember that orchids are only a
tiny part − are commercial plant nurseries. They gain status and prestige
which I am quite positive do translate into sales . They also get the best
spot at some shows − for example in the tent at Hampton Court.

I did go into it, in the first place at the suggestion of Ratcliffes − in
fact we both became Nat.Colls at the same time. Ratcliffes collection has of
course been moved to Florida and no longer qualifies. But one of the ideas
was that we should get help in importing plants . It never materialised.

Nowadays NCCPG want quite detailed records kept − it was suggested that I
should log every plant , record details about growth etc., etc., − this only
required to be done, say monthly ! Rather more work than I want, and
rather pointless I think. In fact the whole set-up is designed around garden
plants, ornamental shrubs, bulbs etc., and does not work very well for
orchids at all. Frankly I only remain a Holder out of inertia, and if they
put the subscriptions up again I shall drop out.

Geoff.

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From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Help wanted...
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 10:10

When I was doing volantary work at the Living Rainforest we were given some very spikey rare palms. As we unloaded them we saw they were infested with scale and mealy bug -too bad for Meths and cotton buds so we made up a spray of 50/50 meths and water. With this we drenched the palms and left for an hour then hosed them down with water.
Next day we did it again and it cured the infestation.
We used the same system on cymbidiums and lycastes with no adverse effect.
One of the chemists at Provado is interested in orchids and would value your input.
Regards

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sian Lim.
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 11:20

Mornin' all, and what a lovely day it is after an early frost.

CITES rears its ugly head once again !!!!!

My point is this, if Sian Lim was offered some so called 'Rare Paphs', I can only think that as money is the driving force in this modern world, that someone somewhere has already started the process of cloning and or seed sowing to make much money in the near future.

For sure, the plants that Sian was offered were not the last reaming ones on this planet.

Point taken ???

Regards, Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Mounting orchids.
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 11:25

Hello Jim,

Can't remember where you live, but if 'Cork bark' is available then I would use it, as just about everyone that uses it tells of how good it is.

However, I would ask this question. Is the teak that you speak of from a natural growing tree, or has it been 'processed' for the timber trade ?

If it is a natural piece of teak and is well weathered, then I can see no problem.

PLEASE do not put a wad of mass between the orchid and the piece of wood.

Regards, Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Scale.
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 11:30

Mornin' Geoff,

I also have a small problem with scale. And like you I do every so often, pick up each plant and exam it. The ones that have scale are then taken into my workshop where I have a bowl of warmish water and Provado mix. I also have a good hand sprayer filled with Provado at the correct mix.

The scale I wash off with a small piece of sponge. Then I spray the whole plant and return it to the green house.

That's about it. Works very well.

I do also use a toothbrush and a slightly bigger brush for scrubbing in areas that have ridges, such as some of the long Cattleya canes/bulbs etc.

Regards, Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Anguel's Nun orchid.
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 11:35

Hi Anguell,

After looking at your first photo, this is what I would suggest.

With shall we say, a pair of small wire cutters [much better than scissors] cut off all of the dead roots back to the base of the bulbs.

Then, using a toothbrush and some warm soapy water, gently scrub the bottom of the bulbs, being very careful not to damage the new roots. Also, be very careful that you do not harm any of the dormant eyes/shoots. On this point I must tell you to do as I do.........always try to scrub with an upwards motion as this is the same way as the shoots grow.

You may be surprised to see how much dirt is removed from the base of the bulbs.

Next step is to try to determine if the back bulb should be cat away or not. If it has started to rot, then I would remove it. If it still looks good and hard, then leave it attached.

What to use as a compost ??? I have never grown a Phaius, but I would suggest some sphagnum moss.

Kind regards, Rocky.

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Help wanted...
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 12:25

Hi Geoff,

Whilst I don't have as many plants as you do, I did
have a very bad infestation of mites on one particular
phal. for a long time. I had to literally bath the
plant twice over a couple of months with that Provado
liquid. Although iit finally did the trick, the plant
was (and to some extent still is) covered by a white
residue all over the leaves. I thought it wouldn't
make it through after that, as it did look very
poorly. However, the following year it gave me a small
flower spike with 5 blooms on it. Not much, but hey
ho! When the blooms fell, I cut the spike down to the
first node before the blooms, and low and behold, some
time later a keiki developed on the spike. I was
waiting to get some nice root system on it before
cutting it down, but now, as well as roots, the keiki
itself is producing a flower spike, so I have decided
to leave it there and see what it looks like when in
bloom.

I know this doesn't really help much, as I don't think
you can use that much provado with all your plants
(that would be indeed very expensive and time
consuming), but at least, provado did it for me.

Francis.

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From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sian Lim and CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 13:55

This raises lots of different issues which seem to get conflated in the heat
of argument.. I guess most of us might agree that digging up rare and
endangered plants from the wild is not something to be allowed or
encouraged.

I think that international trade does encourage this and I agree that any
trade needs to be controlled − even if part of the price is that it's a pain
in the neck to import a few hybrids. However flawed, Cites is what we've
got and it is possible to import plants legitimately. How cites is
interpreted, the training of customs staff and what to do with illegally
imported plants after confiscation are separate issues and the last only
arises when the damage has already been done.

Habitat destruction is another matter and needs to be addressed separately.
I certainly don't think a rare plant hot-housed in London, and isolated from
the gene pool, is any substitute for one growing in the wild. The idea that
international traders in endangered species are doing it for the good of the
plants rather than for the huge profits to be made seems at best unlikely!
I wonder how many of them are active campaigners on environmental
conservation?

Personally I get my pleasure from growing the plants as well as I can and it
is of less consequence how unusual the type. A little competition to see
who can grow it best adds a little ginger to the mix. I certainly would
not want to be associated with those who would acquire a plant whatever the
consequences.

As for Dr Lim, I think his activities reflect on us all. It is cases like
this that means regulation is needed and as a result it is understandable
why anyone wanting to import an orchid will be treated with some caution as
a potential criminal. I suspect most people would understand more easily
importing something for a big profit as opposed to importing it because you
like it's colour or scent! On balance I don't have much sympathy for Dr
Lim.

Andy

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] B & Q rescue.
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 17:20

Hello Rocky,
Nice picture but to me it looks my common or garden Zygo.Have I got some thing special and did not know of it?
Regards,
Ronbow.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 17:45

I have recently become interested in tigers − the big cat kind , not tiger
orchids, and reading and listening to a lot about them . ( We are going to
India for our next holiday with a wild-life tour , hoping to see them ).

CITES was originally invented to "save the tiger" − because "the estimated
number of tigers left in the wild is down below 25000" − and that was in the
1970s or 1980s , making it an endangered species − they are of course spread
very thin on the ground, metaphorically − major predators always are − and
their minimum numbers for viability may be higher than those for a
population of say herbivores (?). India is just starting a tiger census ;
they fear that the numbers may now be below 3500 .

So CITES has not saved the tiger − alas .

The question has also been asked, has CITES ever saved any orchid from
extinction ? And the answer is again, alas, no. At least, no one has ever
said the contrary , and the question when addressed to Dr Cribb ( who was
very directly concerned with CITES in his work at Kew) apparently brought no
answer, and he walked away when challenged on this .

I now put the reverse question ; has the collection from the wild, and
subsequent laboratory production of seedlings ever saved any orchid from
extinction ?

The answer is YES . Wild sites in Borneo have been re-planted with Paph
rothschildianum , sites in UK have been replanted with Cyp. Calceolum, and (
at different sites) 9 other species of endangered orchids , Laelia species
have been planted to repopulate areas of Brazil , work is currently going on
returning some Pleurothallid plants to sites in Monte Verde, in Costa Rica ,
etc. etc. .. CITES gets in the way of this continuing work !

It would even be necessary to ask for permits in order to export seedlings
from UK to Borneo to allow for the replanting to be done , which illustrates
the well-known saying , the law is an ass...

Let me make it plain that I am not in favour of encouraging unlimited or
unlicensed wild collecting ( CITES has nothing to do with that ) , but
logic tells me that a law which cannot be shown to have done any good (
ever) and which can be shown to stand in the way of doing good , should be
changed.

Geoffrey Hands

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Help wanted...
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 17:50

Thanks for the meths/water suggestion ; I shall be off to the ironmongers
tomorrow to buy a gallon or two, and I'll try it out.

I'll also try to find the Provado site , and see if I can correspond -
unless you have a contact ?

Geoff.

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Help wanted...
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 18:25

Geoff,
On the number of plants and the size of your collection, it seems to me that your only hope of total success, is to Fumigate.I am not currently au fait with what is available or whether they have all been banned, but with your connections I would think you should be able to find some usable fumigant.
I once had about a thousand or so, big, 5 feet or so, Tomato plants crawling with Greenfly, Spraying was not on. We fumigated with Autoshreds and had total success. I do not know if Autoshreds are still available. They were as I recall Tobacco based so probably are now banned.
In my opinion, pest like Scale, Mealy Bug ect are usually carried in, and that's how I got the Mealy bug soon after I started my Orchid activities. I did get rid of them, but now every plant is inspected and isolated for at least 7 days and treated then again inspected with a glass before it goes into my orchid house.
I wish you success.
Ronbow.

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From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Scale.
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 18:55

A horticulturist for one of the local public gardens
put me on to Merit made by Bayer. I Googled the
product and maker and came up with a lot of
information. The most interesting thing was the many
names for the same thing. Now I know why you all
mention Provado (it's not sold in Florida, as far as I
know). Merit is very expensive here. But one teaspon
makes 10 gallons.

Below is a paragraph from the site further down.

Imidacloprid is currently sold under a number of
different trade names for different uses. These
include Gaucho® for seed treatment on wheat, Provado®
for tomatoes, Admire® for potatoes, Grubex® for
control of grubs, and Premise® for control of
subterranean termites and carpenter ants. It is also
the active ingredient in Advantage®, the best selling
product for the control of fleas on dogs, cats and
other pets.

http://www.rosemania.com/Pesticide_update.htm

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From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sian Lim and CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:00

I have little sympathy for the good Dr. If he had done his research a little
better, before traveling, he could have taken his orchids to places without
the dangers that he exposed himself to by coming to a country with a
sometimes over-zealous bureaucracy!

Ron

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Help wanted...
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 22:10

Geoff,
Your plea for help combat scale insects encouraged me to look up my old books from my grower days. I quote from Sanders Encyclopaedia of Gardening 1953 edition. First it points out that under glass," Orchids are favourite for attack by Scale insects".It states that fumigation with nicotine or Calcium Cyanide are effective, or DDT oil emulsion insecticide.
I am sure you know that 'Scale' covers a multitude of insects of varying size, up to 1/8th inch and various colour and I am sure that you know they are so called because the are protected for part of their life by a scale. The most common greenhouse one is Brown and it is the scale which makes them so difficult to kill as it effectively puts a sealed roof over them as they adhere to the plant sucking at the sap. You may well find a sticky substance on the plants.
As you know I am not now in commercial growing but I do keep up an interest talk to people in the trade and articles ect catch my eye no doubt as you may do regarding your profession. As I said your problem is scale, the number of your plants and the easiest way is smoke fumigation if available.
You probable have found out how difficult it is to cove every part of the plant and pot and compost
I have an idea that there are high pressure sprayers available for commercial purposes that emit liquid, insecticides ect so fine that it looks like and is a mist and gets to all parts. I believe the Fire Service use such device. So, why not use your FOGGER, but put the insecticide or whatever in the water.If I could not fumigate with Smoke, that is what I would do.You mention the detrimental effect to your Vandas and the loss of the flower is maybe a price you have to pay. Better to lose the flower but save the plant.
One thing you can be certain of. Were there to be such a scale outbreak in the giant commercial growing houses of Israel, Holland or the Far East ect, it would be taken care of PDQ. Personally, I would fancy my chances of success.
Regards,
Ronbow.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: UK National Collections and CITES
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 22:15

Geoff,
So, if the NCCPG, effectively, operates to the advantage of larger
commercial nurseries, most of which are not orchid related, then it
would seem that smaller operations (incl. orchid growers) should
benefit from the bureaucratic accommodations. How do larger
horticultural companies get treated with regard to CITES? Is there
an arrangement to explicitly deny small nurseries a fair deal on such
matters? Is there an implicit prejudice against small nurseries
because individuals can be caught and prosecuted (persecuted?) more
easily than a larger company with political connections?

Paul Johnson

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dr Chong-Yee Khoo
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 00:20

Geoff, how exactly does CITES get in the way of the continuing work to=
re-populate wild sites depleted by collection?

If the production of seedlings happens in country − as we would all expect=
it should logically be − re-population of wild-sites in the country of=
origin clearly doesn't require transport across borders. Therefore, CITES=
does not get in the way.

You cite a number of examples of successful re-planting schemes, including=
of Paph rothschildianum and Cypripedium calceolus.

The only example of Paph rothschildianum re-planting I know of (i.e., as=
described by Eric Hansen at a talk in the Kuala Lumpur WOC) was of plants=
located elsewhere in Sarawak − i.e., in country. No permit would have been=
required, as CITES does not apply.

Your other example is of Cypripedium calceolus (not Calceolum, surely!)=
plants that were propagated and replanted by Kew. Again, this is an example=
of an in-country project. In neither of these examples you cite would=
permits have been required.

Did CITES get in the way of these two projects? No, of course not.

Even if the production of seedlings happens somewhere else (the West coming=
to the rescue again?), then CITES contains provisions to enable this. The=
annotations in the Annexes specifically state that in-vitro propagated=
seedlings in sterile containers are exempt from the permit requirements.

Even where seedlings out-of-flask are concerned, you ignore the fact that=
the system is one of regulation, not of total prohibition. I know from=
personal experience that it is possible for even a layman to obtain=
permits. You do too.

Does CITES make it less convenient than a system that allows free movement=
across countries? Yes, of course it does − but we know the arguments that=
justify this. Does CITES "get in the way" of re-population? I suspect not,=
given the examples you have cited of successful re-plantings.

Perhaps you are also aware of the provisions of CITES in this respect, as=
set out in Article VII of the Washington Convention?

Subsection 5 of that Article allows the management authority of the=
exporting state to issue a certificate to exempt any specimen of a plant=
species that was artificially propagated. Subsection 6 provides for the=
exemption of the certificate requirement to the non-commercial loan,=
donation or exchange between scientists or scientific institutions=
registered by the management authority.

I have no doubt at all that Kew would be such a registered institution − it=
is after all the CITES Scientific Authority for the UK. Perhaps you could=
ask the people at Kew whether they feel that their international=
re-population programmes are being hampered by CITES?

I suspect that the answer would be a resounding "no"!

Regards,

Chong-Yee

P.S. I look forward to your comments on the points I have raised in my=
earlier email.

>I now put the reverse question ; has the collection from the wild, and=
subsequent laboratory production of seedlings ever saved any orchid from=
extinction ?
>The answer is YES . Wild sites in Borneo have been re-planted with Paph=
rothschildianum , sites in UK have been replanted with Cyp. Calceolum, and=
( at different sites) 9 other species of endangered orchids , Laelia=
species have been planted to repopulate areas of Brazil , work is currently=
going on returning some Pleurothallid plants to sites in Monte Verde, in=
Costa Rica , etc. etc. =8A. CITES gets in the way of this continuing work=
!
>
>It would even be necessary to ask for permits in order to export seedlings=
from UK to Borneo to allow for the replanting to be done , which=
illustrates the well-known saying , the law is an ass...
>
>Let me make it plain that I am not in favour of encouraging unlimited or=
unlicensed wild collecting ( CITES has nothing to do with that ) =A0, but=
logic tells me that a law which cannot be shown to have done any good (=
ever) and which can be shown to stand in the way of doing good , should be =
changed.
>
>Geoffrey Hands

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: UK National Collections and CITES
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 01:00

Geoff and others,
My apologies for that last incomplete message. My dear wife gained
access to the computer (something about financial transactions with
our bank) while I was elsewhere and before I completed my notes, and
she sent the message! Yes, it is true! :) :)

Yet, the gist of what was intended was sent, if not the entire series
of thoughts.

Paul

Paul Johnson

On Jan 22, 2006, at 4:18 PM, Paul Johnson wrote:

> Geoff,
> So, if the NCCPG, effectively, operates to the advantage of larger
> commercial nurseries, most of which are not orchid related, then it
> would seem that smaller operations (incl. orchid growers) should
> benefit from the bureaucratic accommodations. How do larger
> horticultural companies get treated with regard to CITES? Is there
> an arrangement to explicitly deny small nurseries a fair deal on
> such matters? Is there an implicit prejudice against small
> nurseries because individuals can be caught and prosecuted
> (persecuted?) more easily than a larger company with political
> connections?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Help wanted...
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 04:40

Hi Geoff: Have you tried simple neem oil?
Sharon

Geoffrey Hands wrote:

I have a problem with scale insects . Its been so since last Summer. At one time I blamed the local fruit farm ( Pick-your own) which is only a mile away , and dead down-wind, sow with open vents. But the vents have been shut for some months now, and plants which were clean before I went away at Xmas have now got the pests on them, so they are still here and breeding , and its not new specimens coming in.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Law.
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 09:15

Mornin' Geoff,

And what a dull day it is in our part of the country. Damp and 'orrible !

Geoff, your last paragraph from your latest E-mail sums it up perfectly:

Let me make it plain that I am not in favour of encouraging unlimited or unlicensed wild collecting ( CITES has nothing to do with that ) , but logic tells me that a law which cannot be shown to have done any good ( ever) and which can be shown to stand in the way of doing good , should be changed.

Which only makes me say again, that the orchids that Lim is doing time have some brothers and sisters in a laboratory somewhere waiting to be sold legally to make someone a handsome profit. At least the so called rare orchids that Lim was caught with will no longer be rare. CITES are blind to this action.

Regards Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Zygo indeed !!!
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 09:20

Hi there Ron,

Zygo indeed !!! Honestly Ron I thought you knew the difference !!! You rascal you, I thought that you were winding me up, but then it may look just slightly like a Zygo to you.

But then again, I guess that some of us have not been carrying the 'Orchid bug' for thirty eight years.

Time for a bit of research Ron, ha, ha.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: UK National Collections and CITES
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 10:20

Opening the NCCPG Directory at random , to illustrate the "average" National
Collection I get :-

Hemerocallis

Hepatica

Hibiscus

Hippeastrum

Hoheria

Hosta

In many cases, several different Collections . Some 8 of the ten listed
offer plants for sale − hence are commercial collections.

As well as being an orchidophile, I am a gardener, flower lover, and
frequent attender at flower shows ( and frequent customer too). I doubt if
these nurseries are interested in wild collection of plants − seed is much
more effective as a way of bringing new plants into cultivation in those
cases , and species are generally unimportant except as providing possible
new directions in hybridising.

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 10:45

If there is the required expertise ( and willingness to take the action) in
an orchid country, then CITES does not stand in the way ; but that is a big
"if"
I know that there are orchid nurseries in Sarawak etc, but do go in for
flasking ?
In the case of the West Indian Islands I recently visited, endemic Laelias
have become rare, although my guide thought that if the peak were explored
by experts, they could still be found.
I went to the National Botanic Garden on that island, and asked to see the
herbarium − which I was told was closed, and most of the references had been
destroyed by termites.
There was no lab there .
I asked about orchids − they have a few , often Asian ones . I asked about
endemics, and was told that there were orchid collections on the island, in
private hands ( the Du Pont family were mentioned as having large estates
with permanent staff of gardeners etc ) .
If the question of re-population were to arise, the work would have to be
done in USA or elsewhere outside the islands .

As to P.rothschildianum , I have the recollection of reading oin the AOS
journal some years ago , after that first gold course was built and one of
the three then known sites was totally destroyed, and after that big raid
when most of the flowering-size plants were taken from the major site, that
it was being repopulated with plants raised in USA . I think that was before
CITES − and I rather suspect before any serious orchid raising from seed was
being done outside the commercial flower nurseries of the East , or the
orchid nurseries of the west.

And the Laelias in Brazil ? raised in Co.Durham !

Makes my point , I think ?

Geoff

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: scale.
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 11:00

Thanks for the input from all − I am replying in a single message for
simplicity.

The various solutions suggested are as follows :-

Provado ( known by different names in different places, it seems ! ) − I
have tried , and indeed I do use a high pressure sprayer producing a fine
fog − so much so that some 6 gallons will do my entire collection, I have
thought of adding it to my humidifier − which produces an even finer fog
spun out of the blades of the fan at 10,000 rpm, but I doubt if this would
give complete coverage. I have mentioned the risk in repeated use, and yes,
I think I have to take that risk again and do say a couple of sprays at a
week apart.

Neem oil. I have not tried that − I have some, in fact use it ( in
solution) to clean up plants and wipe all surfaces before showing , although
a meths and cotton wool treatment is used for spot treatment first , then
the neem oil wipe all over the leaves and bulbs. I'll try that following the
Provado treatment.

Meths − of course this is my standard spot treatment. I am loth to actually
souse everything , but am thinking of an immerse in a bucketful treatment
for any rather heavily infested plant.

I have also noted that things are much worse with plants not in any form of
hydroculture ; could it be that they enter the compost at rhizome level ,
as eggs or nymphs, so as to be able to find the growing point and then climb
up the newest most succulent growth ? And don't like moist compost to enter
? I am making this a working hypothesis and starting some new experiments
with plants known (?) to be clean, just arriving as new purchases, and if
they seem better or ( being optimistic) remain clean after a few months, it
may well persuade me to switch everything I can into the system.

Geoffrey Hands

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: James H
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: yellow phal leaves
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 17:00

hi,
i have been growing this phal for almost a year now, it just sent up a spike
that was growing very well, and was looking alot better than the previous
year. i watered yesterday and noticed that the top leaf on the phal was
turning yellow, there does not appear to be any rot in the crown and i am
very carefull to not get water in the crown. the only way it could get wet
is i have a vanda hanging close to the phal and misting the roots could
possible get tiny drops in the crown but not very much and it would dry out
before night.
i noticed that the spike had stopped growing as fast and is almost stunted
looking compared to when i got it, its about 9" long and buds are forming
where it was over 15" before.
i really like this flower as its a yellow with fine red stripes and pink
veins and looks quite nice.
does anyone know how to save this plant? i will take a pictue when i get
home from work if that will help.
James

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Help wanted
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 17:00

From my experience with scale, the only product that works
is anything with DIMETHOATE as the active ingredient.
Regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Scale ... smoked out..
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 17:50

It occurred to me to Google on the subject , and after some surfing I ended
up at Agropharm who are selling me a set of smoke things − mustn't mention
the actual word starting with B in case my e-mail triggers a raid by the
Metropolitan Police taking me for a terrorist ( they are even worse than
the Cites police if you ask me ).

Anyway , the things starting with B contain the Provado ingredient.

The other sites I looked at all agreed that Provado is the thing − other
than using a biological control , but all those only parasitise a limited
number of the 25 possible species, so might have been a waste of money.

I am surprised to get smoke B.. − maybe the dreaded EU rules on the subject
just prevent them being sold in ordinary retail shops rather than
restricting the customers . Must remember this the next time I want
something like it.

Geoffrey Hands

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: bugs in s/h
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 03:50

Hi all: Geoff's comments about his scale problem and its relation to s/h has
gotten me thinking about asking this question that has been bothering me for
quite a while. I have often noticed what I think are 'springtails'(grey long
thing bugs with antennae which skip or jump across the surface of runoff
after flushing my s/h plants) and tiny (l mm or less) black beetle type bugs
in the stones in my s/h set-ups. I don't know what these are, and haven't
been able to find them listed in any book I have read on orchid bugs. does
anyone know what these are called and if they do any damage to the orchids.
My collection is otherwise bug-free (touch wood) and I have been treating
the medium to get rid of the bugs, but if they do no damage to the plants, I
shall cease! I suspect they have something to do with algae which is often a
problem with s/h, and if they are feasting on it then I definitely want to
keep them!
Sharon
PS My venus fly-trap is about to bloom! Will post pics when fully open. My
several drosera species and my pingicula are doing a great job of
controlling the fungus knat problem!

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Den. finisterrae, hel please!
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:10

Hi group,

I wonder if anyone can offer some help with the
cultural notes of this beautiful (to me) Den.

I bought it last summer with a few bulbous canes, and
a new one developing. It had some beautiful glossy
green leaves on top of the largest canes, and it was
doing fine.

I read it was a cold species, and therefore I put it
outside for the summer, with plenty of light, and
fresh air. It was doing ok and even I got a new
growth/keiki from the top of one of the leafless
canes. Then, in winter, I brought it back inside and
placed it by the window, maximising sunlight whilst
still being cold at night.

It kept growing ok for a while, but recently, the
leaves have started droping like dead flies, and the
newest growth has started to become yellow. I tried to
look up the net for some advice on what the matter
could be, and found very confusing cultural notes,
saying that this species needs conditions closer to
phalaenopsis, with intermediate to warm temperatures
and low levels of light!

I am very confused, and don't know what to do now... I
don't want to loose this plant. Any advise?

Thanks in advance,

Francis.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] yellow phal leaves
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:55

A yellow leaf is not due to water in the crown- which justs rots out the
growing tip so that a further new leaf is not produced, or the new leaf
which is being produced rots off very quickly. But rot usually goes brown
rather than yellow, and spreads with a very clear demarcation from the dead
part to the so-far uninfected part. Whereas yellow usually has a much less
clear boundary. Yellow just it just means that the whole leaf has died
rather than there being rot spreading through and killing it. All of this
is a bit academic though , and not much help , except perhaps in your
understanding !

Sounds like a cold snap to me.

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: James's Phally.
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 09:15

Hi James,

If an 'Orchid Doctor' was given the symptoms over the phone, without having seen your Phalaenopsis I would think that he would ask these questions:

What minimum temperature does your Phally get ?

Where is it kept ?

What type of compost is it sat in ?

What is the state of the compost ?

And yes, please send a photo.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tim Fulcher
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Off topic now, Quicktime
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 10:20

Chong-Yee, thankyou for pointing that out. In which case if people
haven't reverse engineered the Quicktime format I don't hold out much
hope for it. Although I thought Apple were trying to make Quicktime
available for the majority of people. All the links to Quicktime I've
found for Linux point back to my original link.

Perhaps you should consider an alternative format that is more
accessible, otherwise you're in danger of heading down the Microsoft
route. Surely there's something that would work under X11 on your Mac
since a lot of graphics development was done with SGI machines way
back, and IRIX is a flavour of unix?

Sorry I can't help any further

Tim

Dr Chong-Yee Khoo wrote:

> Thanks for the tip, Tim.
>
> Unfortunately, the site says:
>
> "Today Quicktime 4 Linux is intended mainly for content creation and
> uncompressed movies. These usually arise during the production phase
> and not the distribution phase of a movie."
>
> My 3D orchid images are compressed (they have to be, otherwise, they
> would be enormous)... I am still looking around to see if there is
> anything else in Linux that can open Quicktime VR files.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tim Fulcher
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: CITES, Kew and confiscated plants
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 10:40

Roger,

Don't get the wrong end of the stick. Kew because of its size and the
expertise (in theory) gathered there, runs a quarantine house for the
UK government. This is something that has been described to me as a
hothouse for spreading interesting bugs, but...you could say that this
is run on behalf of DEFRA. I suppose an alternative would be for the
National Collection Holders to receive the plants, and maintain them in
quarantine, but I can't see them being that enthusiastic of more unpaid
work and expense coupled with inspections. I can't think off hand of
any alternatives, if customs ran the house, they'd have to pay
horticulturists who'd still get it wrong as they'd be generalists. And
there's enough exotic bugs freely roaming this country as it is,
personally I think that's how CITES should be repackaged, it might be
more palatable that way!

As it was explained to me, the plants will be sent to this glasshouse
which is within Kew somewhere and in 6 months or whatever the magic
figure is (rabies anyone??) they will be released. Where they go then
depends (presumably) on any prosecution and also correct identification
of the material. Assuming of course they weren't harbouring any nasties
- in which case they're incinerated, I'm not sure if they check the
plants for viruses. One question for the lawyers out there: if the
plants were exported without a permit in the first place, how can they
be repatriated since they can't be issued with permits from the UK as
they're illegal here?? Or have I misunderstood how CITES permits are
granted??

Back to the topic at hand, whether the orchids survive the quarantine
is not at issue, much like all the hot air blown up over CITES.

Source, someone who works for DEFRA as a quarantine officer.

HTH or contributes to all the hot air...

Tim

Roger Grier wrote
>
> Hi to all of our world wide members,
>
> Having read the E-mal from Chong Yee, and looked at one of the web
> sites, I
> can only ask you to read this sentence which I have copied and pasted:
>
> The plants now belong to Customs. If and when they are handed over to
> Kew
> we will be in touch with the likely countries of origin to determine
> the
> future of the plants."
>
> Say no more!!!
>
> My question is this: If Dr Lim was stupid enough to bring in FLOWERING
> PLANTS, then he is an idiot, but, as I suspect, he would have brought
> them
> as maybe non-flowering or seedlings, who would know that they were
> highly
> prised????? Who could tell one from another???
>
> Do I smell a rat?
>
> Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:50

Sharon,
Indeed, the first beast that you are describing sounds like
springtails. Normally, they are not a health problem to the plant,
but because they prefer moist to wet conditions; they are often
indicative of old and poor potting media. Most springtails are
feeding on decaying organic matter, fungi, bacteria, and algae. Some
are predators on other small critters, such as soil mites. They are
known to feed on stressed or infected plant tissues and can be a
significant problem in seeding beds prone to damping-off fungus.

Now, speaking of mites, I would hazard the guess that your "tiny
black beetles" are orobatid mites, also called beetle mites. Much
like the springtails they are not generally a problem for orchids,
but can be indicative of decaying conditions. They, too, are feeding
on decaying organic materials and causative agents.

Both creatures are more nuisance than plant pest in most situations.
The best longterm solution for both is to try to dry out the growing
area between waterings, ventilate a bit more if possible, and check
for any plants that are in need of repotting. If you grow a mixed
collection of plants be sure to check the non-orchids, too, which are
also common sources of scales, aphids, whiteflies, etc.

Paul

Paul Johnson

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 14:15

My understanding is that Sproingtails are harmless to orchids.

Black beetles are beneficial − their diet includes slugs !

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Zygo indeed !!!
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 15:35

Hi Rocky,
A bit of a wind up as I was sitting here and feeling a bit peeved after 7 days with this coldlie, flue like bug that is going the rounds.
Actually the flowers of the 2 plants are as near identical in shape as makes no matter and it was only when I got to the orchids for the first time in 5 days that was able to see that the colours are a bit different being more purple on the lip and no stripes on the petals. The flowers have just gone over, but another spike will flower in about a week and I will send a picture. Clearly the plants are different and with more flowers on yours. My plant looks like a Aspidistra, it's in a 6 inch pot and is 25in high. Takes up too much room, I think I will have to get rid, I would rather have Phals in the space.
OK, I admit I have only had the bug for just over 6 years, but I have been a plant grower for 70++++++++++.
It's freezing up here and the grass is white.
Cheers,
Ta Ta.
Ronbow.

Roger Grier wrote:

Hi there Ron,

Zygo indeed !!! Honestly Ron I thought you knew the difference !!! You rascal you, I thought that you were winding me up, but then it may look just slightly like a Zygo to you.

But then again, I guess that some of us have not been carrying the 'Orchid bug' for thirty eight years.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Scale ... smoked out..
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:20

Geoff,
I,I'm glad that you have found a smoke as I was pretty sure that you would as there are many Fungies and Pesties available to the pro growers ect that are not available to the public. For example I am a register Green Keeper as I take care of the Green at my bowling club and as a result can obtain all sorts of Fungies & Pesties that others cannot. The one thing I cannot get is some thing that stops the worms from casting, can in Europe and USA but not in UK. You did mention that you thought your contamination had been blown from a fruit farm, in which case they will most likely be, Mussell scale which is common on fruit trees. I'ts oval in shape rather like the Mussel it is named after and should be about 1/8th inch in length. and colourd grey or black. Spaying with soft soap is said to be effective.

Perhaps you could tell me, for I don't know. Are systemics detrimental to Orchids. They are most effective and I have used them many times on all sorts of plants and in particular for Red Spider Mite. I would hesitate use them with Orchids, but Provado is systemic.
Good luck with your problem,
Ronbow.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Coelia bella divisions
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:55

In case it is not obvious, I shall defer sending any divisions out until
I'm sure that the scale thing is history.

I don't mind folk pointing to a particularly lovely orchid and saying "that
came from Geoff" but I would hate it to be that someone spotted scale on
your plants, and you said the same thing .

Geoffrey Hands

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: DEFRA − KEW − CITES.
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 17:30

Hi Tim,

Thanks very much for your reply and information. I guess that all orchid hobbyists, [First in line] and Orchid Nurseries [Second in line] as they are in it for the money only, are all in the same boat when it comes to trying to get a sensible arrangement regards orchids.

To take one point that I made a little further, I would love to know if in fact it was a customs official who could identify the so called 'Rare Paphs', and if they were in fact in flower or not.

Then, as I have suggested, could not the 'Rare Paphs' immediately upon confiscation, be hurried of to a laboratory for cloning work to be commenced. Or some similar action. The of course, in a few years the world would have many of the so called 'Rare Paph'. And my final question once more..........is this not being carried out already somewhere???

Regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: dedrobium
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 17:45

Francis I understand that your likes intermediate temperatures with moderate light so maybe the cold spell didn't do it much good. It depends what the temp dropped to. With luck it'll recover and put up some new growths so keep going with it.
James I've had yellow leaves occasionally on my Phals and have discovered two reasons at least with mine. If the plant itself becomes too wet at the roots it will happen and also I think age is partly responsible sometimes. I was told by an orchid person who owns a nursery that the Phals drop an old leave when they have four or five already and then put a new one up. If you've checked the growing medium and it's fine then with luck all should be well and you shouldn't lose any more leaves at least until the plant has made more. Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: nancy
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:15

What is s/h, please?
Shipping/handling?
sunny/humid?
Thanks − Nancy

~~~~~~~~~~~~
"A sharp tongue is the only edge tool
that grows keener with constant use."
Washington Irving (1783-1859)

-------------------------------------------------------------
From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 09:35

I was initially confused too, since in classified advertisements in the UK
s/h usually means second-hand :-) However, in this case I suspect it means
semi-hydroponic(s)...

Regards,

Tricia

You can't have everything, where would you put it?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dr Chong-Yee Khoo
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 00:00

Geoff,

You made a very clear statement that "CITES gets in the way of this continuing work", i.e., the work to produce orchids from seed and to re-introduce them into the wild. I'm afraid that I have seen nothing in what you have written so far that justifies this statement.

In support of your argument, you cited a number of examples of re-planting, but it was unfortunate that you included examples of in-country work not subject to CITES.

You did mention a project to re-introduce Laelias to Brazil, from County Durham in the United Kingdom. I do not dispute that it may be necessary in some cases for the production of seedlings to be done outside of the country of re-introduction. However, as I have pointed out in my previous email, even where this is the case, CITES permits are not needed where flasks are being shipped. Where seedlings are concerned, permits are needed − but you seem to imply that they are impossible to obtain.

I thought the whole point about the permit system was to regulate the movement of plants, not to ban it altogether. Perhaps you know something that I don't?

Perhaps you have more details of the example of Laelias raised in County Durham which you are not sharing with us. Were permits needed in the first place − i.e., were seedlings shipped in the first place, not flasks? Did the seed-raiser encounter difficulties with obtaining permits for the seedlings? Were these difficulties so extreme that they prevented the work from continuing?

I would pose the same questions with regard to your Paph rothschildianum example. Once again − can you provide evidence that CITES got in the way of this valuable work?

The work of Kew and others in propagating orchids from seed and re-introducing them to depleted sites is highly laudable, and something we should encourage and support. I don't think it does anyone any favours to claim that this work is being prevented by CITES, in the face of a complete absence of any evidence that this is so.

So, with great respect, I don't think your point has been made at all. Neither have you justified your statement that CITES is a nonsense, or that there is such a thing as "CITES police", or that CITES stands in the way of doing good.

Indeed, I am rather surprised that you have not taken the opportunity to rebut (or at least comment on) any of the points I have made regarding CITES in my emails. It's not often that you find anyone nowadays defending the Convention (flawed, imperfect and full of bureaucracy as it is). On the other hand, people seem to love taking pot-shots at CITES without bothering to fully understand its provisions, or to consider its benefits in deterring smugglers like Dr Sian Lim and encouraging seed raising to satisfy local markets. I hope you're not one of them!

Regards,

Chong-Yee

P.S. Before anyone suggests otherwise, this discussion on CITES falls squarely within the "exchange of ideas, information, hints and tips on orchids and related matters" said to be the purpose of this group (www.orchid-talk.co.uk)

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From: James H
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: yellow phal leaves
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 00:25

i checked a bit more and the leaf broke off at the spot where they usually
fall off underneith there was some rot in a long strand that looked like a
bug trail through an apple, i carefuly cut it away untill i got to the
center where the growing tip is and the entire inside was hollow and rotten.

what could have caused this to happen so fast, should i be concerned for the
rest of my plants?
James

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 17:55

I thought it meant second hand ?...soft/hard......sweet/heavenly.....the
;list must be simply/hextensive...

Geoff.

nancy wrote:

What is s/h, please?
Shipping/handling?
sunny/humid?
Thanks − Nancy

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: James H
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] James's Phally.
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 19:15

min temp is 10C but hasnt gone lower than 15C this year.
its kept on a table with the rest of my orchids under a 250w mh bulb
its in spagnum moss in a clear orchid pot (has slits down the side to let
air in), the roots are green with no sign of rot and were growing very fast.
compost is like new its about 8 months old.
im at work still so i cant get a pic till tomorrow, i have confermed that
the orchid will be dead as the entire inside is rotten but i will take a pic
of what is left after my surgery :-P

On 1/24/06, Roger Grier wrote:
>
> Hi James,
>
> If an 'Orchid Doctor' was given the symptoms over the phone, without
> having seen your Phalaenopsis I would think that he would ask these
> questions:
>
> What minimum temperature does your Phally get ?
>
> Where is it kept ?
>
> What type of compost is it sat in ?
>
> What is the state of the compost ?
>
> And yes, please send a photo.
>
> Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] James's Phally.
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 22:35

The significant question , which I forgot to ask, is which leaf turned
yellow ? The newest, or the oldest ? The answer is very significant in
terms of whether you should worry or not.

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 15:30

Geoffrey Hands wrote:
> I thought it meant second hand ?...soft/hard......sweet/heavenly.....the
> list must be simply/hextensive...

Seemingly/hendless even :-)

--

Tricia

These taglines aren't always all that interesting...

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From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 00:20

I thought you called them stove houses.

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From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bugs in s/h
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 00:45

Nancy: It stands for semi/hydro.
Sharon

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From: mojca klancic
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: algae and s/h
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 07:40

Dear orchid friends,

since recently I was convinced that algae growing in my tarnsparent s/h pots was harmful. I tried to get rid of it by repoting or using Physan 20. Well, I just read an article on growing orchids in water. I found the article on the UK orchid forum. The author affirms that alge is required for healthy root growth. I would really appreciate if you shared your personal experience with me.

Mojca from Slovenia

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From: Silvio a Beccara
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] algae and s/h
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 09:55

Hi Mojca,

well, I've never had problems with algae, apart from the fact that they can
clog pipes or water level indicators. Some people say, and I cannot disagree,
that they are beneficial to plants, since they increase oxygen levels in
water through photosynthesis. If they become too abundant, though, they tend
to eat up nutrients...

Hope this helps

Silvio from Italy

ps: would mind avoiding using HTML in mails? I think it is unnecessary, and it
can host trojans and viruses.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Provado
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 14:15

Who is the manufacrurer of Provado and what is the active ingredient?
Thanks for the info.
Peter from Bloubergstrand

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Systemics
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 14:25

Systemics work very well with orchids.
I'm using a systemic for spider mites on my Dendrobium cuthbertsonii's
2 x anuually and I have 11 plants in all colours, most of them in bloom
at the moment.
Also, I'm using a systemic fungicide without any problems on all my
orchids.
Regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: James H
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] James's Phally.
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 16:15

newest leaf turned yellow, if it was the oldest leaf i would not have to
worry because they fall off once in a while

On 1/25/06, Geoffrey Hands wrote:
>
> The significant question , which I forgot to ask, is which leaf turned
> yellow ? The newest, or the oldest ? The answer is very significant in
> terms of whether you should worry or not.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Notice.
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 17:20

Hi all,

I will be 'Away from my desk' as they say, for a couple of weeks or so.

Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Scale insects
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 17:40

Paul Johnson has drawn my attention to some pages published by the South
Dakota Orchid Society ( now defunct)which are very helpful and informative.
I have downloaded them, and maybe will scan them and Tricia can put them on
our site, with acknowledgment.

They make the interesting point that methyl alcohol − which is the basis of
methylated spirits − can damage thin-leaved orchids., I had noticed dark
patches where I had used it ( by no means always, but just occasionally )
and the explanation is given , but quite clearly it is to be avoided − the
dark patches are necrotic and likely to be invaded by bacteria/fungus with
further problems..

However, the alternative and preferred substance is isopropyl alcohol, which
is often mentioned in US publications under the name "rubbing alcohol" with
the implication that you get it from your corner drug store, or whatever the
right words are for pharmacy in USA . But I have never come across this
here.

Can anyone tell me if isopropyl alcohol is available, and what do I ask for?

Geoffrey Hands

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] algae and s/h
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 17:55

Hello Mojca,

As far as I can say from my own experiences, algae don‹t do any harm to
orchid plants / roots.
Most people don‹t like them because they don‹t look good and sometimes
they produce a little strange smell.
But you can‹t avoid algae growing due to your translucent pots (stagnant
water or damp surface + light = algae).
I‹ve got 3 Ascocendas / Vandas with roots coated by green alga and they
grow and flower without any problems.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Provado
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 08:50

Provado is a trade name used in UK by PBI ( Pan Britannica Industries) which
is a subsidiary of the Bayer Chemical Group.

The active ingredient is thiaclopid.

Its formulation and properties make it suitable for use a systemic , and it
was originally marketed as a drench for compost to be used for growing
ornamental plants susceptible to damage by vine weevil − an increasing pest
in Northern Europe due to climate change. Later it wqas ( and still is )
marketed as a systemic insecticide for dilution and spraying , also as a
ready-mixed spray , and as an aerosol , under names such as "Vine Weevil
Killer" and "Lily Beetle Specific ".

PBI/Bayer claim effectiveness against a range of insect pests, but point out
the risk of immune populations .

Like all systemics − (all chemicals ) − its is dangerous if used to excess
both as to frequency or dilution , both to animals including that well-known
species homo sapiens , and to plants , especially orchids of the tribe Vanda
tribe .

The ideal way of using insecticides in the greenhouse or garden is to follow
the instructions exactly − and change active ingredient frequently .

That's why , after using Provado 3 times on my scale insects, I am treating
them to a dose of permethrin via my Mini Fortefog Fumer today .

Hi fellas, today is party day , come and have a fling in the fog ! Bring
your gas-masks..

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: MARK GRIFFITHS
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Provado
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 10:20

Geoffrey Hands wrote:
Hi fellas, today is party day , come and have a fling in the fog ! Bring your gas-masksŶ.

Geoff, I assume the dress code is black tie?

Mark Griffiths
Oxford, England
Zone 8
www.inspiringplants.org

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: len.handley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Iso Propyl Alcohol
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 10:25

I have a 500mL tin of this fluid, also known as Isopropanol. I bought it
several years ago for use when preparing microscope slides and now use it on
my orchid leaves. I got it by mail order from a firm called N.B.S. of 3
Betts Avenue, Marlesham Heath, Ipswich. I know that the original owner,
well known in the microscopy world, died a few years ago so I don't know if
the buisiness still exists.
Len Handley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Provado (microscopic text on a dotty background)
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 11:50

Hi Peter
On my plastic bottle of Provado concentrate, in letters very definitely not
for the poor-sighted, it says that it contains 10g/litre imidacloprid and
410g/litre of sunflower oil (the latter being (I think) mainly for spider
mite.
The manufacturers,, again in printing designed not to be read, are
pbi Home & Garden Ltd, (note that pbi is in lower-case)
Durkan House,
214/224 High Street
Waltham Cross,
Hertfordshire,
EN8 7DP
UK
www.bio-garden.co.uk
tel; +44(0)845 345 4100

they also have an advice line given as 0845 345 4100

Even better is the website;
http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/extoxnet/haloxyfop-methylparathion/imidacloprid-ext.html
from which the following was copied;
Physical Properties:
Molecular formula: C9H10ClN5O2
Molecular weight: 255.7
CAS #: 13826-41-3
IUPAC name:
1-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitroimidazolidin-2-ylideneamine.
C.A. name:
1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine.
Form: Colorless crystals with a weak characteristic odor.
Melting point: 143.8 degrees C (crystal form 1) 136.4 degrees C
(crystal form 2)
Solubility in water: 0.51 g/l (20 degrees C)
Solubility in other solvents @ 20 degrees C: dichloromethane − 50.0 −
100.0 g/l; isopropanol − 1.0-2.0 g/l; toluene − 0.5-1.0 g/l; n-hexane −
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Provado active ingredient(s) thiacloprid-imidacloprid confusion
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 12:10

Hi Geoff/Peter and anyone else interested in Provado,
Following my recent (10 minutes ago) reply to Peter about imidacloprid, I have read Geoff's reference to thiaclopid. Being curious about what is on my bottle of concentrate and Geoff's info, I looked up 'thiaclopid' on the web too and discovered that all the entries are in German. Not having found a reference there to imidacloprid, I wonder if thiacloprid is a German trade name for the same stuff.

Both seem to work on the nerve receptors and it pays to do a web-search on the names for technical data and also to see what your fate might be if you really misuse it!

The sunflower oil, I suspect, is either a surface carrier for the x-cloprid or simply to bung up the spiracles in spider-mite.

Geoff? Can you add anything re-the two names and possible equivalence? Wasn't patent law your patch before becoming a gentleman of leisure?

John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Provado
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 14:45

Active ingredient is imidacloprid and it is made by
Bayer. In the US we buy it under the name of Merit or
Premise. Merit is an insecticide and cures many plant
problems. Officially it can only be used on the
plants that appear on the list provided on the product
bag. Premise is for termites. Same product,
different uses. What we gardeners sometimes say and
do doesn't necessary jive with the written word.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: oils spiracles and stomata
Date: Fri, 27 Jan 2006 23:30

Can anyone out there help me to understand why it is that the application of oil emulsions (Neem, sunflower, mineral oil) is supposed to block insect and arachnid spiracles and yet not harm the plant leaves and their stomata? Maybe plants' stomatal pores are too big to be blocked as easily as insects' spiracle pores. (?)

Ideas anyone?
John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Provado
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2006 02:00

Sack-cloth and ashes − especially the ashes !

Geoff.

MARK GRIFFITHS wrote:

Geoff, I assume the dress code is black tie?

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Iso Propyl Alcohol
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2006 02:05

Thanks Len ; in the meantime I visited my friendly local pharmacy , and had
a chat ; they can get it on special order for £5 for 1/2 litre . I guess I
can dilute it , so that makes it not too much more expensive than meths -
buy hey, its my orchids − nothing is too good for them...

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Provado active ingredient(s) thiacloprid-imidacloprid confusion
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2006 02:30

Organic chemicals were not my scene in Patents − it was automotive and
aerospace which paid for my caviare and champagne.

Mind you , there is a whole area of organic chemicals especially protein
chemistry in biochemical matters- just one example is in relation to what
exactly happens when a suitable pollen hits the stigma and as I recall it
half a dozen different proteins come into existence , one after another,
over a period of weeks, before the pollen tubes started to grow down into
the ovary , and weeks before fertilisation actually happened, never mind
seeds starting to develop ( a lovely example of how "intelligent design" is
nonsense ) which fascinates me, but I lack formal education about this -
come to think of it , I lack formal education about most things which
interest me now.

But I lifted my info. straight from a website which looked authoritative (
what else in 2006 !! ?? ) .

I can't think that German ( technical German , not conversational ) is a
problem ?

I guess that thiacloprid is a trade name ; imidacloprid too for that matter
- after all ,
1-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitroimidazolidin-2-ylideneamine. hardly
trips lightly off the tongue does it !

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] oils spiracles and stomata
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2006 09:35

A blocked spiracle results in suffocation within x minutes (?) The oil
evaporates (?) decomposes (?) ceases to be effective in blocking the
spiracle by tomorrow − but bugsy is dead by then.

The spiracle is blocked tonight , but , by the same mechamism is open again
tomorrow ?

The stomata are certainly much more numerous ( thousands per sq. cm ) ,
maybe different dimensions ?

Its not difficult to surround bugsy with a cloud of droplets which may even
be drawn in by the normal action , whereas its quite difficult to coat every
part of the area of every leaf of a plant (?)

I have convinced myself, anyway !

Geoff.

John Stanley wrote:

Can anyone out there help me to understand why it is that the application of
oil emulsions (Neem, sunflower, mineral oil) is supposed to block insect and
arachnid spiracles and yet not harm the plant leaves and their stomata?
Maybe plants' stomatal pores are too big to be blocked as easily as insects'
spiracle pores. (?)

Ideas anyone?

John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: MARK GRIFFITHS
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Iso Propyl Alcohol
Date: Sat, 28 Jan 2006 12:40

Hi, I bought pure isopropyl alcohol from a local chemist for a few pounds recently.It's also used as a solvent for cleaning tape heads etc. No problem in getting it, it is harmful if swallowed and definately not something to work with if you have a cigarette in your hand.

all the best, Mark

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] oils spiracles stomata and demise tolerance
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2006 00:50

OK Geoff,
Anyone capable of convincing you can convince me too! My suspicion was the significance of the size difference − I confess that I hadn't thought of the relative numbers or the vulnerability of an (animal) organism that needs to have air permeate spiracles continuously as opposed to a plant's tolerance of intermittent gaseous exchange. I suppose that's how the 'leaf shine' vendors get away with it! Thanks for the ideas anyway. (Next Q;, why do your brain cells function while mine simply atrophy?)
Cheers
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] On the inebriation of under-age scale insects
Date: Sun, 29 Jan 2006 02:10

Geoff,
I bought isopropyl alcohol (for cleaning optics) with some difficulty; it was in a half-litre bottle labelled "not for sale to the public unless repacked in a suitably labelled container . . . .". However, my pharmacist is permitted to sell alcohols only in the containers in which they are supplied to him. We overcame this Catch-22 by an agreement of the mutual recognition of short-sightedness. I hope you have better luck but remember, you may also find that using it for "rubbing" onto leaves as opposed to yourself may qualify you for membership of a criminal class unless the label is appropriately endorsed! Such is life in the 21stC.
John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Cork Bark
Date: Mon, 30 Jan 2006 19:40

I have at last received the address of his UK Office from my friend who has
a cork 'farm' in Portugal. It is:-

Nick Spencer-Jones

Rankin Brothers & Sons

3c Drakes Farm

Drakes Drive

Long Crendon

Bucks HP18 9BA

Tel: 01844203100

Fax:01844203101

It has taken a bit of time to get it because my friend, Ewan Rankin, has
been spending a lot of time in London, where his wife has been treated for
cancer.

Ron

This email has been checked by Norton Internet Security

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From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] ID help − Eria aurea
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2006 12:30

We have a small bark-mounted orchid lebelled Eria aurea (image attached)
I have been unable to trace such a species although I have encountered passing references to Eria eria − could eria sound like aurea? (there's no author reference).
Has anyone encountered this species or one whose name might be confused with it?
John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] ID help − Eria aurea
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2006 17:20

It appears to be a valid species − syn Trichotosia aurea.

I found a few references via Google − even supposedly a picture, but the
link did not work for me.

Yours looks unlike any Aurea I have ever seen, but it's rather a rag-bag of
a genus, and the few plants ( have, or have had, are totally different from
one another until you see the flowers, and then a certain shape and habit (
usually upside-down compared to most orchids) is apparent.

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: No Paphs photos
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2006 20:40

Hello all,

Again it is really quiet on the list and therefore I will take the
opportunity to show you some photos of my flowering Rossioglossum
grande.
I grow this plant in pure hydroponics (I showed an image of the roots in
my mail from early November 2005) and now it is flowering with 8
beautiful flowers on its spike.
I hope you will enjoy the images.

Best regards from Germany, Rudolf

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Dr Chong-Yee Khoo
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] ID help − Eria aurea
Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2006 20:45

Hi John,

Eria aurea was described by "mad" Ridley in Journ. As. Soc. Straits, xlix. 31 (1908). It is now considered a synonym of Trichotosia aurea. Try looking under this name.

Citation:
Trichotosia aurea (Ridl.) Carr, Gard. Bull. Straits Settlem. 8: 99 (1935).

Regards,

Chong-Yee

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