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2005 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

November 1—7

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 08:40

Hi Sharon,

So good to see the photos of your Cattleya. Question, does the container have any holes in the bottom?

I can't see much wrong with it, but what Andy suggests should get it going in the correct way.

Do you REGULARLY feed it?

Does the medium that I see on the top of the pot, with the nice roots, go all the way to the bottom?

Regards, Rocky.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: CITES.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 08:50

Hi all,

A fictitious letter for you to ponder over.

Hi everyone, I'm an Orchid Nursery owner from California and I work mainly in the Cattleya alliance and their hybrids. I employ fifteen full time working staff, and we have a very good working relationship.

Together we seed raise thousands of orchids and we also clone what we think will sell well. This has been going on now since the mid fifties.

I have heard, and have been told that British orchid growers can 'Import' orchids from other European countries without the need of CITES documentation, SO WHY CAN'T THEY BUY FROM ME IN A LIKEWISE FASHION.

Maybe someone can explain to me why this is not allowed.

Regards, Rocky.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sharon's catt.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 08:55

Sharon, I expanded your picture to full screen and it looks as though you have more than one plant. Has it flowered or was it bought as a seedling? It looks as if you have two or three plants inter twined. Regards

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis read
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Vitamin B1
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 09:35

Vitamin B1 is the main ingredient of Superthrive, so i'm told. a few years ago a member of West Sussex O S unknowingly let an opened bottle fall into his water tank. He ruined his whole collection of Phals. I no longer use it on established plants but will dip a poorly growing plants roots in a diluted solution as I repot it. It seems to help. I have also used it, at half strength when potting seedlings from flask.
In my opinion be careful in its use. Regards

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: CITES.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 13:00

In article ,
Roger Grier wrote:
> Hi all,

> A fictitious letter for you to ponder over.

> Hi everyone, I'm an Orchid Nursery owner from California and I work
> mainly in the Cattleya alliance and their hybrids. I employ fifteen full
> time working staff, and we have a very good working relationship.
>
> Together we seed raise thousands of orchids and we also clone what we
> think will sell well. This has been going on now since the mid fifties.

> I have heard, and have been told that British orchid growers can 'Import'
> orchids from other European countries without the need of CITES
> documentation, SO WHY CAN'T THEY BUY FROM ME IN A LIKEWISE FASHION.

> Maybe someone can explain to me why this is not allowed.

Rocky, I am firmly of the opinion that you are concentrating on the wrong
area. I think you should shelve the business of not being able to import
certain hybrids from countries outside the EU for now and put your energies
into getting nursery-grown hybrids removed from CITES. I think their
argument that customs can't be expected tell hybrids from species is
somewhat specious (!?) because there must be some method of identification
for things other than orchids which could be modified to suit. Otherwise
nothing would ever be traded.

Please don't take offence but I believe that if you continue on your
current path you run the very real risk of alienating the people you need
on side.

Kind regards,

--
Tricia

A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: CITES.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 14:05

Hi Tricia,

Many thanks for your comments, thing is, I can import nursery grown hybrids............from Italy, and Customs Officials don't even need to look in the box.

Do you se what I am on about??

Kindest regards, Roger.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Semi Hydro and Phals
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 17:00

Hi Ron,
Do not change the growing medium of your Phals. Phals will grow in anything, if
the
roots can grow into it. If the roots are placed into something different they
most
certainly will stop growing and eventually rot off. So stick with SHC and the
Phals.
will be happy.
Kind regards
Peter from Bloubergstrand

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 17:00

Hi Dennis and Roger: Thanks for your thoughts. I tried to take it out of its pot yesterday and it is thoroughly stuck there. One nice root tip snapped off. I dumped as much lecca as I could out and saw a great number of super healthy roots, along with a couple of dead ones. I have no idea what it looks like at the bottom. I will give it a drench of Physan to get rid of any rot. I don't want to break the pot to get it out if not necessary. There is a drain hole about 1" up from bottom to control the level in the base. I let it get dry before refilling, and mist the top roots as the water doesn't wick all the way up to the top. The lecca is all the way to the bottom. I have been giving it either MSU fert or bloom fert once a week over the spring/summer along with Superthrive once a month.
I bought the plant a year ago -it was in lecca in a plastic pot so I put it into this pot in s/h right away. When I repotted it, it was all one piece.
I had planned to leave it in this pot until it was hanging over the sides in all directions. The pot was obviously not as glazed as I thought as the roots stuck to it. I will have to smash the pot to bits when it is time to repot in an effort not to kill all those beautiful roots!
Should I leave all the stalled growths on it and let the new growths develop? Will the stalled growths start growing again, especially since there are new growths developing at their bases? Or is pruning required, and if so, do I remove the stalled growths or the new ones?
Please tell me what I should do??? I don't know if the plant bloomed before I got it -there looks like maybe one old cut from a bloom spike, but it could have been a leaf cut also.
I really appreciate your help. Has anyone out there had a plant like this one before???
Sharon

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: CITES and an explanation required.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 17:40

Hi Tricia and everyone,

Tricia, how about this method of approach.

Could someone from CITES and/or DEFRA please explain to me how it is that I can buy/import orchids from an Orchid Nursery deemed to be within to the European Union group of Countries without any documentation at all. The parcel/package/box is delivered to my home by the postman, no problem.

The orchids that I would import/buy, are clearly shown in the CITES agreement to require such documentation. They are of course listed in Appendix 1, 2, or whatever. So why is this 'Law' being by-passed?

I suggest that before 'They' answer me, they stuff the CITES agreement into their respective pipes, light it, and have several good long puffs, sit down and ponder my request very deeply.

Then, maybe, just maybe they might see the light.

Regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: lynne edwards
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Digest 2005 Volume 106
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 18:35

Hello There. My one solitary plant is called Phalcenopsis Orchidee and stands approx 43 high. Has 4 adult leaves and one just growing. it came in a glass container 17x17. the flowers are coming one after the other. read one of the letters that said to put it in a plant pot. Have seen them in a long glass vase and been quite successfully grown this way. they don't actually grow in the water then, just moisture.

Regards Lynne

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Citing CITES ad nauseum.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 19:45

Rocky,
Ponder you 'ficticious letter' for a moment, it is nonsense. There was once a time when the 'other European Countries' were countries in an independently-trading sense with independently regulated trading borders (I recall innocently falling foul of the Netherlands-German one once with a car full of (would you believe) old chair legs!). Now, for the purposes of trade and inevitably associated cross-boundary contamination issues, they (and we included) are all one. We, the UK, are a part of Europe by agreement in spite of some reluctance by some and in spite of the fact that the word Europe is commonly used in the sense of "those across the Channel from us". In other words, the EC countries are effectively states in a trading community whose great asset is that freedom of trade (even of old chair legs) within its (not their) boundaries. The downside could be (say) rabies or other trade connected hazards.

Unless there has been an announcement during my typing of this email, the collective USA (another collection of more-or-less free-trading 'states') has not yet embraced Europe (Mr Bush's famous 'Urp' as Steve Bell quotes him).

True, there are differences in the politics of the respective affiliations but,for the purposes of trade, the USA is one country and Europe is another. In many ways, Europe has it better than the US; try taking apples from Nevada to California for example! I have also heard of instances of mandatory destruction of fruit trees in the US on which owners happen to have orchids growing. Their affiliation of States is on such a great geographical scale that there are some horticultural safety contraints just as individual European ones may act defensively during (say) a foot-n-mouth outbreak or a period of Colorado beetle infestation (but, then, you'd be unwise to move suspect animals or plants from farm to farm in the UK, let alone to other EC states).

That the general idea of CITES is good, there is little argument. That there are problems (which amplify out of all proportion when a small orchid-loving community contemplate their navels as we tend to do) is also unarguable and frustrating. If improvements are ever to be achieved, it will not be through arguments based on falsehoods like the contents of the fictitious letter.

If politicians were to spend as much time trying to sort out the problems of CITES on our behalf as we have been rehearsing and advocating, it is conceivable that a few other irritating little problems like Iraq, pensions, global issues, and next door's lleylandii might have to be shelved!

Really, Geoff has said it all (and perhaps far more eloquently).

John Stanley

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES - a nosey parker jumping in.
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 20:05

Roger,
Please forgive my jumpin' in yet again when you are addressing Tricia, but buying orchids from Italy is like buying 'em from just down the road. We are both in the the multilingual 'country' called the EC, just like my local Cheshire Bridgemere Garden World is.The only trade difference being the need to have an amphicar or a ferry or a plane to get there. Ports and airport customs in and out of these countries are for illegal objects like drugs or plants brought in from outside the EC. Simple really!
Tricia is quite right; any hope for change requires a sound basis for argument, not one that can be knocked out by a naive barrack-room lawyer like me. Sorry to go on but there seems to be a collective head-banging on brick walls going on.
I share your frustration but not your illogical aguments. Let's get back to orchids eh? (listen who's talking I hear you say!)
John Stanley

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jana Zommer
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Vitamin B1
Date: Tue, 01 Nov 2005 22:50

hi all,
as a source of vitamin B you can use ..... real good beer or ale!! :) it is not a joke! once every month spray on the paphs - and they will say many good words by growing up :)

regards,
jana

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES explanation requiredand offered.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 00:55

Rocky,
I am from neither DEFRA nor CITES but surely the reason is that whatever list the plant is on for CITES purposes, and provided it isn't being dug-up from the wild, you can buy it from your next door neighbour, your friend in the next town or more distantly anyone else . . so long as it isn't being imported. 'Importing' is the word used for bringing stuff from abroad. Transporting stuff from one EC 'state' to another is not, in this sense, importing because the stuff isn't coming from abroad. 'Countries' abroad are those of a different economic association or affiliation like, say, the USA, China or India. I think there is no anomaly at all about that nor a need for explanation from DEFRA or anyone else.

Maybe the problem you have has to do with the use of the word 'country'. We have lived through a Europe as a collection of economically discrete 'countries' to one that is now an association of member states cooperating as an economic community and, therefore, for the purposes of CITES, a single country within which legal goods may be moved about as personal posessions or for trade. Send it to Switzerland or buy it from Switzerland and you have to cross a regulated border into or out of the EC from/to a different country and CITES would then apply even though one might not think that 'imports' or 'exports' are possible across a land-locked border. They are.

CITES tries to safeguard plants (you might argue that point) from being moved, without regulation, from one country, across an economic border to another country. Such regulations, therefore, do not apply within a single country like Europe.It is technically not easy to have a system of regulation across borders without customs (Like Scotland/England/Wales). Of course, we have customs at our sea-and-air-ports which are used also for importing from abroad but, as an EC citizen you don't have to do more than show a passport to prove that you are an EC person. You would only be scrutinised if you were thought to be trafficking in illicit goods, stolen goods or hazardous unlicensed cargo or otherwise creating a danger.

Yes, I know we call Germany or France 'countries' but aren't they, technically, member states of an economic unit or country-of-states. Our vernacular for places like countries, states, communities or even continents is out of date and almost certainly differently defined in different subject areas. (for example, we may refer to the Indian Continent for political purposes but geolgically it is a part of Asia - which is not, strictly, a continent either!).. the Red Sea and the Med are both, in my subject area, oceans but I can hardly communicate with non-geologists using the name Red Ocean! It is the same sort of misunderstanding . . . I think).
Hope this helps but I think it is more or less what Geoff offered
Phew! Cheers
John Stanley

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Max Redman
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Cattleya question.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 04:20

Sharon asked about her Cattleya which she thought had some problems.
I answered in orchid digest but realize that not everyone reads it or has it
sent to them.
I have had a look at the pictures that you sent and can find nothing at all
wrong. Why did you try and de-pot it?
I have about 5,000 different orchids of which about 40% are catts. and if
all of mine looked like that I would be very happy.
I remember you saying that the new bulbs! were not as large as the previous
years but this does not mean much. They will grow all though it takes
time.With all the new growths that are showing you shoulb be quite happy. If
I have missed something I apologise but really it looks fine.
Max.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: jan
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 05:55

Sharon Williams wrote:
> Hi Dennis and Roger: Thanks for your thoughts. I tried to take it out of its pot yesterday and it is thoroughly stuck there.

[Snip]

Here's what I'd do: get the plant out of the pot as soon as possible. In
my experience orchid roots will get stuck on anything - that's the way
the plant manages to stay in place on trees etc. I have lost a couple
plants in the beginning because I didn't realise they had run out of
space like this.

What happens is generally that they grow vigorously, fill up the pot,
stall - and then the roots die. Get as much of the compost out as you
can and see if that makes the plant more maneuverable; if you're any
good with a pair of chopsticks they are very good for reaching into
small holes. If you manage to get enough of the compost out, you can try
to very gently prise the roots away from the sides of the container with
something, eg a knitting pin.

In the future I suggest you stick to cheap pots - I buy the glazed clay
pots I find in my local garden centre, they cost around £1 and look
fairly OK; and it is no big loss having to break one.

/jan

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: jan
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Containers and such
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 06:05

Recently I got some ideas about planting orchids which I unfortunately
can't really begin to try out immediately, since I am moving to China
soon (-ish), but perhaps some of you have tried something similar.

In my garden I have used old bricks for a lot of things: edges around
flowerbeds, paving (this is 'seriously crazy' paving: not at all level
and laid directly on soil; I did this because I wanted this sort of
unkempt look). What I find I like very much is the way moss grows all
over some of the bricks; the bricks suck up moisture from the soil and
give good growing conditions for the moss.

I think it could look fabulous having orchids growing on that kind of
material; after all, some mount orchids on cork. I'll definitely try it
out when I get settled down. Just a thought.

/jan

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Phalaenopsis in a glass container.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 08:10

Mornin' Lynne,

Did you by chance buy your Phalaenopsis from Marks and Spencer?????

I remember someone who did.....showed me the plant and container.....inside the glass container was the orchid growing in a plastic pot.....stuck to the bottom of the glass container with a piece of sticky solution. Whole thing 'surrounded' by coloured sand. Of course what could not be seen was the fact that the plastic pot contained the conventional type of compost.

Hope you will now see why it would be advisable to 'poke around' and see what you can find.

Then let us all know so that we can give more advice.

Regards, Rocky.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Phals
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 08:45

Sharon, most of my Phals sound a bit like that! When necessary I have repotted and they still survive. I stilll have my very first orchid which must be about 30-35 years old now - like it's owner too old to remember exactly. I find they are probably the easiest of all orchids to grow and flower yearly so are very rewarding. It sounds to me as though you are a natural! You have a thriving orchid and I'm hopeful it will continue successfullly for many years. Good luck. Jean

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: oops
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 08:50

Oops! I see we were talking about Cattleya's Sharon and not Phalaenopsis. Now for me that's a different story. I have a higher failure rate with those unfortunately. The strong ones struggle on and reward me with flowers but quite a number have gone to orchid Heaven and I think it is something to do with temperature. I can't seem to please all of my orchids all of the time. What I said about your plant still stands you seem to have done the best thing for it. Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Cities
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 08:55

I think the reason we can import from any European country is that now we are all subject to European laws on the matter and therefore they deem it safe. Outside they are not subject to our laws and I know it is ridiculous not being able to import from say Australia and America where probably the laws are much tougher but c'est la vie!
Jean

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Alan Garner
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Cites
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 08:55

Hi, Roger

I am sure we all appreciate your concern re cites but please can we change
the record? You are getting at the wrong people. Try getting at your MEP to
change the law. DEFRA is only an agency not a law making concern.Perhaps a
monthly(?) bulletin would suffice to keep us informed of any progress.

Good luck!

--

Boss

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 09:00

Jan is absolutely right - the rots stick to everything. It won't harm your
plant if you soak the pot in water for a few hours before gently prising
them away, provided you keep the water level below the 'stems' of the plant
(I say stems, because it applies to phals also). I have used this method
successfully many times and think it does less harm than smashing the pot!

--
Tricia

To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism; to steal from many is research.

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 09:10

Hi Sharon

I too have had a close look at your photos.

The plant looks healthy and clearly has good roots. I think it may just need to settle down. I always repot new orchids and some take a while to get used to my culture. I would leave well alone and wait.

Andy

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 09:20

Sharon, I think you have answered your problem, see my earlir response to Jon about vitamin B1 and Superthrive In my opinion you have overdosed on superthrive. Thoroughly wash out the plant, pot and media . Use only water for a month and then a balanced fertiliser until it is stable. regards

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cites
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 09:25

Well said .I for one am getting fed up with the same pointless argument about
Italy. Suggest you direct your attention to our representatives on Cites.
Regards

"Alan Garner" wrote:

> Hi, Roger
>
> I am sure we all appreciate your concern re cites but please can we
> change the record? You are getting at the wrong people. Try getting at
> your MEP to change the law. DEFRA is only an agency not a law making
> concern.Perhaps a monthly(?) bulletin would suffice to keep us informed
> of any progress.
>
> Good luck!

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Digest 2005 Volume 106
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 10:20

Lynne,

Phalenopsis Orchidee is the (usually) printed label that the commercial
growers put on a plant when they can‹t be bothered to tell you the full
name.

Short-term survival is possible in Glass but if you are more ambitious and
want it to grow and later produce more flowers for you, you must repot it in
something that will let it breathe.

Ron

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Semi Hydro and Phals
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 10:25

Hi, Peter from Bloubergstrand!
Which Ron were you addressing?

Ron

P G Hieke wrote:

Hi Ron,

Do not change the growing medium of your Phals. Phals will grow in
anything, if the roots can grow into it...

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon's Cattleya.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 10:35

Sharon- you can release roots which are stuck on just by soaking the whole
thing. In other words put the whole pot and plant in a bucket , in the bath,
in the swimming pool ( if its too big for the bath ! ) or whatever , and
leave it wholly immersed for 30 minutes. If you use a bucket, add a few
drops of washing up liquid ( detergent) as wetting agent. Then you will find
that they peel off without breaking.

Geoff.

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Containers and such - growing in bricks
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 10:40

It used to be the standard "compost" for Vandas - when I was a lad about 100
years ago. Bashed up bricks - not whole ones !.
The word was that the older the bricks the better. What this really meant
was that modern high fired bricks like dense concrete were no good at all.
Old bricks from that tudor cottage being demolished down the road, fired at
a low temperature, and much softer, were not only easy to break up, but
worked much better too - more porous you see.
They were growing them that way in Singapore botanic gardens the last time I
went there , but that was perhaps 10 years ago , but may have changed now

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jon Loose
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: CITES explanation requiredand offered.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 11:10

Hi John

You have put the case perfectly but I think quite a few of us have tried to
communicate this to Rocky and failed. I think we should all put it aside as
I for one am getting bored with the subject. My own feeling is that our best
ally in this could be Kew who have both horticultural and botanical
interests as well as political clout in the subject. No organization will
take kindly to being bullied though.

Jonathon

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Cattleyas.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 13:25

Hi Jean,

Looks as if all this bad weather is coming from your direction!!!!!

Jean, you mentioned that you do not do so well with Cattleyas..........can I possibly help, after you have given me some information.

Regards, Rocky.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Jana's Beer medicine.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 13:25

Hi Jana,

I have heard of this before, and very recently I read in the local newspaper that a huge pumpkin was grown by giving it a daily drink of a certain type of beer. I believe the beer was named 'Goliath' and is brewed in Oxfordshire.

Do you, or do any other of our members have any more information on this subject.

Regards, Rocky.

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sharron's Cattleya.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 13:35

Hi Sharon,

You wrote: There is a drain hole about 1" up from bottom to control the level in the base.

Do you mean to say that there is ALWAYS one inch of water sitting in the bottom of the pot?????

You also said: as the water doesn't wick all the way up to the top.

Do you think the water should wick all the way up, because I don't. The roots do store an awful amount of moisture and feed for a very long time. When I water my orchids, I do not think of watering the compost/medium, I think of filling the roots up with water/feed. It's as easy as that.

Is it possible to very carefully drill a hole [or two] in the bottom of the pot?

Regards Rocky.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jana Zommer
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Jana's Beer medicine.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 17:20

Rocky hello,
about pumpkin i`ve heard first time! :) but if you use beer for orchid it would be "alive" and unfiltered.
All the best,
jana

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: CITES.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 18:25

Hi all,

Yes, I was expecting people to tell me to shut up, as they were getting fed up with my constant E-mails and constant bickering..........but that is what I wanted.

It told me that the information that I had gathered from you all, and some of it was extremely interesting and helpful, was just about at its end.

I have stored all of the messages that you sent, and now armed to the teeth I will aim my effort at another area.

If and when I get any concrete news I will let you all know.

Kind regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Catasetums.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 18:30

Evening all,

I have always been very interested in the pollination method of Catasetums.

What interests me specifically is the fact that the pollinia are ejected at such a rate and at such a long distance.

Ponder a minute and ask yourselves what creature pollinates this Genus of orchid.

If it were a small flying insect the pollinia would surely miss it most of, if not, all of the time. And the stigmatic surface which relies upon the insect to deposit the pollinia, is very often quite far from where an insect would land.

I'm asking for a miracle, but I wonder if has ever been captured on film?

Regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: catts, Florida
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 18:45

Jns! I'm green with envy again. I would so love to have a climate where I could grow these splendid orchids outside. Your plants look so wonderfully happy and healthy. Thanks for the photo it is good to see how well the plants are doing.
Rocky - yes please any help is always welcome. If I could only choose one type of orchid to grow it would be a cattleya but there are among my least successful orchids. I have some in flower bud now so I'm pleased but on the whole my catts never look really healthy. A few of them have that unsightly black marking on the leaves and even when they sprout new ones I alread see the markings faintly formed. I think Geoff's reply has give me the clue as he talks about a minimum of 60 and the minimum in my greenhouse is 54F at night - 60 during the day (winter) I have a mixed house and have had to give a mid temp which has at times proved to warm for some and too chilly for others. At one time I had two greenhouses - one cool and one warm but I now have one larger greenhouse for all my plants. I could put some plants in one of my husband's but it isn't heated at all so that's out. I feed all my plants with Seramis feed which is a complete feed for hydro or semihydro culture. Most things flower whatever medium they are in. I have some catts in bark and some in stone. I like the sound of beer on paphs and intend to give it a try. Jean

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From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: CITES explanation requiredand offered.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 19:45

Jonathon,

Guess it must be the ex-educator in me. Never give up sort of thing . . but I agree.

Cheers
John

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Detective work.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 20:05

Hi all,

Can any of you please tell me the name of the orchids displayed on the two stamps.

I know the name of the 50F one but the old memory bank is running slow this week!!!

The 100F stamp, well, looks like a few familiar items.

Thanks Rocky.

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Jana's Beer medicine.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 21:45

Rocky,
Many years ago I used to be involved with people who grew and showed Pot Leeks. It was almost a religion and was very competitive and valuable prizes could be won. Every one had their own special wonder and secret feeding methods, one of which was Beer or Ale. In these parts Newcastle Brown Ale was very popular and in great demand both for feeding the leeks as well as inebriating the growers and is still to be had. Whilst I am not now involved, it still goes on and is as fiercely competitive as the Pumpkin contests currently making news.Believe me it was almost a religion with the mining community.
Ronbow.

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Semi Hydro Culture
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 21:55

Hello all, Thanks for all the advice re SHC. Just one more thing, does any one know of a substance that can be safely added to the water to prevent the growth of Algae? I do add some Bleach to water when I leave it in containers for humidity purposes and it sure keeps the water clear but would it damage the plant roots?
Ronbow.

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From: nancy
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catasetums.
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 23:15

Rocky asked who pollinates catasetums...well, when my
friend's bloomed, it was her husband! He was so
enamored of the pollinia-flinging mechanism that he
kept expelling it onto their friends. Loved it!
When I saw that my Catasetum superbum buds had opened,
I dashed into the house to get my camera...by the time
I got back outside, every single one of those rascals
had been expelled by some randy bee!
Regards - Nancy

~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You can lead a horticulture
but you can't make her think."
- Dorothy Parker

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES Abandon hope all ye . . . . .
Date: Wed, 02 Nov 2005 23:35

Roger,
It isn't a matter of some of us getting fed up (although some, no doubt are). The point is that arguments are a two-way learning exercise. I would be happy to carry on, outside this forum, but you seem to throw out challenges and when there's a critical response you ignore it and continue with the same old (to some of us) falshoods. Geoff and I and others have pointed out in varying degrees of logic and explicitness, what we think are the weakness in your argument, what do you see as weakness in ours that prevent you being convinced?. At no time (i think) have you challenged our criticisms and explanations.or come around to agreeing. Hence my references to banging heads on brick walls, both you and us. There is no argument but a repetitious exchange of conflicting logic.It is almost as if you want to fit facts to the argument rather than argue from the facts. No cases will be won that way.We've tried and some of us have not lost patience - just beginning to abandon hope.
John

Roger Grier Wrote:

Hi all,

Yes, I was expecting people to tell me to shut up, as they were getting fed up with my constant E-mails and constant bickering...

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catasetums.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 07:55

Hi Rocky,

Quite recently, on BBC2 (I think), there was a series
called 'The miracle life of plants' (or something
similar). I do seem to recall that there was a good
bit about orchids and their habits. In one of them a
Catasetum was being visited by either a wasp or a bee.
When the pollinia was thrusted on its back it very
nearly knocked down the poor beast! It was something
quite well worth watching. I have deflasked two
Catasetum flasks (not very succesfully), and should
have a couple of seedlings of pileatum and about ten
of Penang. If they survive to flower, then I'll be
happy!

Regards,

Francis.
--- Roger Grier escribió:

> Evening all,
>
> I have always been very interested in the
> pollination method of Catasetums.

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From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Dracula growing culture.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 08:00

Hi group,

I have recently had the opportunity to adquire 6
Draculas at a very cheap price. The plants arrived
yesterday, and to my surprise, they look extremely
healthy and all have new leaves growing on them. They
have come from a person in Spain who needs to get
downsize his collection for some reason, and sold them
to me. I was surprised though at the fact that they
came in ordinary pots. I have always been told that
Draculas need a particular type of pot, like a mesh or
full of holes one, because of the growing habit of
their flower spikes.

The plants in question are Drac. bella, cordobae,
eritrochaete, felix, incognita and vellutina. I'm
thinking of repotting them, as some had been knocked
out of their pots whilst in transport, and could do
with a firmer hold on their compost, but I'm doubtful
about the pot type.

What would you recommend? Also, for the compost, would
it be better chunky or fine bark chips?

Francis.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Detective work.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 08:25

Number 1 looks like Polystachya " Artist had a hangover" ( joke - as far as
the specific name is concerned )and Number 2 looks like a Habenaria.

Didn't Kew publish an "Orchids of the Comores Islands " sometime ? Or was it
something French I saw on the subject ( they used to be French until we took
over during the Napoleonic wars , I think.)

Geoff.

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From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: sterilzing
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 08:30

Ron B we used Milton sterilizing solution to sterilize babies bottles and it was also used in a weak solution for brain surgery so I've been told (I was a registered nurse). I put in an internet search to see if it is still available and it is and if you type 'milton sterilizing' into a search engine a surprising number of articles come up on it - goldfish, electronics etc - a wide range of subjects but most of them seem to say 'rinse well after sterilizing' so although it seems harmless to most things I've no idea what it does to plants perhaps one of our botanists will know. I didn't pursue the search for any length of time but you may feel it worth a further search. Jean

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From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: stamps
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 09:05

Sorry I can't help with the name of the stamps Rocky but wonder if the top is an aerides - here is the url to a photo of a similar one - note 'similar' and not 'identical'
http://www.orchidsonline.com.au/species1133.html

and the lower one could belong to one of several groups but I can't find it in my encyclopaedias. Jean

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From: P G Hieke
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Semi Hydro and Phals
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 08:10

Hi, Peter from Bloubergstrand!
Which Ron were you addressing?

The other Ron, Ron Bower.

Ron

From: Beccy Holmes
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Jana's Beer medicine.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 11:45

Any idea what these semi-inebriated leeks tasted like?

"Ron Bower" wrote:
>
>Rocky,
>Many years ago I used to be involved with people who grew and showed Pot
>Leeks. It was almost a religion and was very competitive and valuable
>prizes could be won. Every one had their own special wonder and secret
>feeding methods, one of which was Beer or Ale. In these parts Newcastle
>Brown Ale was very popular and in great demand both for feeding the leeks
>as well as inebriating the growers and is still to be had. Whilst I am not
>now involved, it still goes on and is as fiercely competitive as the
>Pumpkin contests currently making news.Believe me it was almost a religion
>with the mining community.
>Ronbow.

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From: Tim Fulcher
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] CITES
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 12:20

OK I'm probably out of touch on this, but John you mentioned it in the
preceding paragraph - England, Wales, Scotland and N. Ireland - and
presumably the Falklands! Just a thought when Roger talks about borders
and countries.

Tim

On 3 Nov, 2005, at 09:57, Orchid Talk Digest wrote:

> Yes, I know we call Germany or France 'countries' but aren't they,
> technically, member states of an economic unit or country-of-states.
> Our
> vernacular for places like countries, states, communities or even
> continents is out of date and almost certainly differently defined in
> different subject areas. (for example, we may refer to the Indian
> Continent
> for political purposes but geolgically it is a part of Asia - which is
> not,
> strictly, a continent either!).. the Red Sea and the Med are both, in
> my
> subject area, oceans but I can hardly communicate with non-geologists
> using
> the name Red Ocean! It is the same sort of misunderstanding . . . I
> think).
> Hope this helps but I think it is more or less what Geoff offered
> Phew! Cheers
> John Stanley

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Dracula growing culture.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 13:30

Many - not all - Draculas have pendant spikes. I used to grow a lot , and
tried to guide the spikes so that they rested on the rim of the pot , but it
did not always work.
Baskets are best, then if a spike does go down into the compost it stands a
chance of emerging ( with very loose open compost).
Of course , they are difficult to grow well that way . They come from places
with very high humidity where (perhaps) they get soaked with mist every
night, and a weekly watering is a poor substitute.

Geoff.

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From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Nemes please?
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 16:30

Pictures 0001 and 0004 are of the same orchid which I have had for some time
and it has bloomed for me at least once before - but I have lost the name
tag.
Picture 0002 is a dendrobium which was given to me as an (80th) birthday
present with no name. The flowers are a beautiful pure white colour - quite
impressively so
Your help would be much appreciated.

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From: Antonio Ariza
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: [OrchidTalk] RE: Catasetums.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 17:00

Wonderful series!!! I recommend everybody who has even the remotest interest in plants to buy it (the title is "The private life of plants") on DVD (or VHS if you're still living in the millennium) ;oP

About the Catasetums, I have a few and I think they're great. They would even be greater if the flowers lasted more than just a week.

Here goes my lecture: "Catasetum pollination 101":

They are pollinated by Euglossine bees in nature, which are large solitary bees found in the American tropics. The males of these bees visit the flowers of orchids in the Stanhopea tribe (which includes Embreea, Gongora, Coryanthes, Acineta, Paphinia and Sievekingia among others) as well as in the Catasetum tribe (which includes Clowesia, Mormodes, Cycnoches and Polycicnis among others), and the amazing thing is that each species of bee seems to visit only a certain species of these orchids. This explains why there is hardly any natural hybridisation between these orchids, many of which share the same habitat. The male bees visit the flowers to get aromatic oils from them and not nectar or pollen. They need these aromatic oils to make their own pheromones (volatile hormones that will attract the females). This also explains why the males of different species of bee need to visit different species of these orchids, that way each species of bee will produce completely different pheromones, which means the males will only attract their own kind of female. The aromatic oils of these flowers are very potent and you usually can smell these orchids from a great distance. The bees are obviously even better at finding them and that is also why the flowers last only a few days (sometimes only a day), they don't need to wait a long time to make sure the bees visit them, they "know" the bees will visit them as soon as they start to pump out their aroma. Once a flower has been visited by a bee they will generally wilt in less that 24 hours. Producing the aromatic oils is very expensive in terms of energy and the plants minimise this by immediately halting aromatic oil production for those flowers that have been visited by a bee.

The really sad thing is that if ever any of these orchids were to become extinct, their particular species of bees would become extinct as well because of their extreme dependence on each other. The orchid is not pollinated by any other kind of insect because it doesn't produce nectar, and the bees can't reproduce because the males can't attract the females and make them sexually receptive.

Regards from rainy Dundee

Tony

PS: in bloom right now: Catasetum osculatum, which sadly enough won't be able to make till Saturday, when I'll go to the Scottish Orchid Society's AGM in Pitlochry.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Nemes please?
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 17:15

Hi Ron, Did my card find its way to Portugal ?

The white dendrobium is of course a hybrid, and many crosses have been made
( and no doubt named) and it is impossible to say which one this is. I
bought a fine one in Singapore once, so I called it "Dendrobium Singapore
Snow- URG" ( un-registered-grex ).
Phillippe LeCoufle calls such plants " Dendrobium sans famille"...

The yellow oncidium type looks familiar, but I can't put a name to it at the
moment

Geoff.

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From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Cynoches peruviana
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 18:00

Hello again. I recently acquired the above plant at the beginning of October. It arrived bare root with a bud on it. I potted it up in sphag to get it established, but of course the bud tanked. I have read:
i)that after blooming you should remove the plant from the pot and set it aside. Wait until the new growth is 4" before repotting.
ii) When dormant, all leaves gone, don't water it and make sure it does not get rained on. Put it in a dry spot and keep hands off. Eventually it will initiate a new growth and now comes the hard part. DO NOT WATER IT! After 2 weeks water it for the first time. Until the new roots get 2" to 3" long water it once every 2 weeks 0NLY. Very hard to keep from watering it more often at that point, don't feel sorry for it. Soon the plant should be a robust 4" tall with even a flower spike starting. Now water the hell out of it with lots of fertilizer. It will flower and produce nice green leaves. Eventually the leaves will yellow, immediately slow down to watering every 2 weeks and when the leaves fall off stop watering and the cycle starts over again.

Problem is it still has all of its leaves, and it never did get to fully flower, so the normal process was aborted. Do I let it get totally dry now with its leaves or continue to water infrequently until they are gone?I am not sure how long the flowers would have lasted had they bloomed. I have also read that they are very easily killed when new acquisitions as they are finicky to get established. I would appreciate any help from those experienced with this plant.

thanks tons

Sharon in Calgary

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Stamp identification.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 18:15

Hi Geoff,

Thanks for the identification on the two stamps. I agree with you on both, but the blue colour on the Habenaria seems a bit strange.

I well remember when I used to do a write up on Orchid Stamps for a magazine..........you should have seen some of the ghastly efforts!

Kind regards, Rocky.

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From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sharron's Cattleya.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 18:20

HI Rocky: the plant is allowed to go dry for a couple of days before getting refilled. To drill holes in the bottom of the pot would be to defeat the purpose of s/h. As the pot is 8" deep, the new roots take a while to get to wetness, hence the need to spray the tops.
I am beginning to see that there are no definitive answers to be had on this question. Some say leave it alone, some say more fertilizer, some say take it out and divide it. I find it hard to believe I have overdosed it on Superthrive as I only use it once a month at 2ml/gallon. It is not overgrowing the pot so I 'm not sure why I should risk repotting it now although I am very thankful for the advice on how to do that without damaging the roots. I really am no closer to knowing what I should do with the plant, or what caused it to grow so vigorously. I thought it liked me!! But I don't want it to kill itself by growing too much, and I would surely like to see it bloom. It will be spectacular if it does!! Is it possible it would kill itself by trying to grow too much? And the biggest question I guess is 'Will the stalled growths begin to grow again now that the conditions are more stable?".
Thanks again, I appreciate this caring community.
Sharon

Roger Grier wrote:

Hi Sharon,

You wrote: There is a drain hole about 1" up from bottom to control the level in the base.

Do you mean to say that there is ALWAYS one inch of water sitting in the bottom of the pot?????

You also said: as the water doesn't wick all the way up to the top.

Do you think the water should wick all the way up, because I don't. The roots do store an awful amount of moisture and feed for a very long time. When I water my orchids, I do not think of watering the compost/medium, I think of filling the roots up with water/feed. It's as easy as that.

Is it possible to very carefully drill a hole [or two] in the bottom of the pot?

Regards Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Jean and Cattleyas.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 18:50

Hi Jean,

First of all, where do you keep your Phalaenopsis??? If they are in your mixed house what is the lowest temperature that they get???

If it's any help to you, this is what I do with my Cattleyas.

Let us assume that I have just purchased a nice Cattleya from a Garden Centre. The flowers had gone over and it was in a section of plants that were reduced in price. I did in fact buy four such plants last year. I did of course give them a very good dose of 'Looking over' before I chose those four. Leaves were clean, and there was signs of new growths, or at least where they would appear next year. In all, everything seemed O.K.

Took them home..........into the workshop..........de-potted them, and made sure that ALL of the compost [floor sweepings from an International Importers warehouse] as it contained just about everything that you could think of, was shook free. Any stubborn items were carefully removed by hand.

Then a luke warm bowl of soapy water was made ready, and the plant dunked up and down quite vigorously. Then I have ready a fine pointed pair of tweezers and a tooth brush. The tooth brush is used to scrub the bulbs and the rhizome. When doing this be VERY CAREFUL around the area at the base of the bulbs where the eyes are. ALWAYS scrub/stroke with an upward movement, as this will, hopefully ensure that you do not break of any of the eyes. You might be very surprised how dirty the rhizome was, and how clean it now looks. Any old sheaths that were around the bulbs and eyes which are now very wet, will easily pull away with the aid of the tweezers. This of course will also bring light and fresh air to the dormant eyes.

Now it's the turn of the roots. Any dead/rotten roots are cut off with a pair of wire cutters, scissors, whatever suits you best, as close to the rhizome as possible.

If the bulbs are quite tall and not standing up as straight as soldiers, the get a piece of wire and twist it around the top of the bulbs from one to tother and make them look good.

If your plant has four or five bulbs and you want to try to get it to throw some back shoots/eyes, then cut a 'V' shaped slot out of the rhizome between bulbs and at least one third of the way through, maybe nearly half way.

Now pot the plant.

Of course I will use my stone chippings. Make sure that the back of the plant is hard-up against the rear of the CLAY pot [clay pots are nice and heavy, and they hold the damp] pour in the stone chippings. I firm them down with a thick wooden knitting needle. The rhizome is about level with the rim of the pot.

Do I then put in a stake? Hell no! The stone chippings compost holds the plant very firm. Only time I do use a stake is when some unscrupulous dealer sells me a plant without any roots.

Of course, the bottom line is that in this gardening/orchid world, we find that some plants never do good in our hands where others do well. I can't grow African violets!!!

Do have another try Jean.

Kind regards, Rocky.

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From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Nemes please?
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 19:15

Ron, It looks very similar to my Dendrobium Emma White but there were many
mericlones of white Dendrobium phalaenopsis hybrids on sale a couple of
years ago. Regards

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Phals and Catts
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 20:25

Hi Peter, thanks for your reply but I'm fine with Phallies. It's the Catts that I'm not so good with. Any ideas on those? Thanks - Jean

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Ron
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 20:30

Ron I'm not sure about 2 of the photographs but could the Dendrobium be 'Emma White' it looks like one I have. Jean

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From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Catasetums.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 21:15

Hello Rocky,

I‹ve got a small article about the pollination of Catasetums at the
example of Catasetum fimbriatum in my literature. It is pollinated by
the male of a bee species ( EUPLUSIA AURICEPS ). The male bee collects
scents on the lip of C. fimbriatum and uses them to mark the boundaries
of its territory during his mating season flights.
Unfortunately the photos were made inside a laboratory therefore the
insect was substituted by a wooden stick.
Nevertheless I attach two of them which show the ’Pollinarium‹ of C.
fimbriatum and the landing phase of it on the wooden stick.
Sorry can‹t find more but I hope it will help you slightly.
Best regards from Germany,
Rudolf

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From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Jana's Beer medicine.
Date: Thu, 03 Nov 2005 22:10

Hello Becky, No I'm afraid I do not know what the Leeks tasted of as I never
ever ate one. Nor infact did many others for the Leeks, even the plants
that did not win, were cherished and guarded and then replanted so as to
grow on and provide seed heads and so keep the strain going. The grower and
or owner, for they used to sold on for big money,( Relative that is to those
days and the then community where money was scarce.) would have had them, if
he could, locked away in a bank! The Brown Ale was never wasted for even if
it first went into the Grower, it would eventually find it's way into or on
to the leeks, If you can see what I mean!!!
One of the reasons I never tasted them was because I don't and did not like
Leeks or Onions. But I believe that the monster Leeks, or any monster
vegetables, are not good to eat..
Maybe I should see if my orchids like Newcastle Brown Ale, but I won't drink
it first. I am Teetotal.
Cheers,

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jean Lewis
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: bees
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 09:15

Thank you for the information on bees Antonio I find it fascinating and continue to marvel at the ways of nature! I agree about the DVD/VHS - it is a wonderful film and well worth buying to watch again and again. I love orchids but have never and will never try a Catasetum. Mine need to produce flowers that last longer and preferably those that don't take up too much space. Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: growth
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 09:20

Sharon I remember when I was new to orchids I rang a well known Orchid person here in U.K. his family has run an orchids nursery for many years. He told me that if the plant appears to be growing well leave it well alone. It will not harm itself. We, unfortunately are the well meaning ones who do the damage. I am not good with Catts but I can't see that the amount of feed you give is in any way responsible and I do know know that Catts would hate to be repotted unnecessarily. I also remember thinking that there was such diverse advice in every book I looked at that the only thing to do was to find out by myself from experience and on the whole it has worked quite well. I know it is very upsetting to lose a plant that you are keen to see flower but it has happened to all of us I'm sure so take courage, do what you think is right, cross your fingers and if you lose it don't be discouraged just start again. Jean

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Phallies and Catts
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 09:30

Thank you Roger for your very helpful message on Catts. I shall print it out and keep it for when I buy another Catt. I had decided reluctanty to buy no more Catts but I will have one more shot at it. I have about 6 now and I see that 3 have flower buds and the others a new growth. They do struggle on and flower each year but just seem unsightly and a bit sickly. As for the Phallies they are all kept in the house and I have quite a number! I don't risk them in the greenhouse any longer (well I have one small one there as I think it needs more humidity) since the slugs had a banquet on six of them in one night. Some I had to turf out but the others I kept and they have made a couple of new leaves and I'm just waiting for another when I'll cut off the damaged ones. Thanks for your help. Much appreciated. Jean

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sharon's Swan orchid.
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 09:30

Mornin' Sharon,

Don't take it out of its pot. Just follow what Mother Nature does.

Yes, it is one of those orchids that do shed its leaves, although sometimes not all of them.

Yes, it does like a 'dryish' rest. Dare say in its natural habitat it does get some 'damp' most days.

Nothing special about the treatment, just follow your instincts, and we all know that you are not new to orchid growing and its many questions that are thrown at us.

The only thing that I would be against is Sphagnum moss. And I say this with a bit of cheek..........Sphagnum moss don't grow up trees do it???

Kind regards, Rocky.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Semi Hydro and Phals
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 15:00

Hello Peter,
Thank you for your advice.
Ronbow.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Nemes please?
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 15:40

Hello ,In reply to this message, I am Ronbow (Ron Bower, the good looking
one) The other Ron (Newstead) is not me but I do believe that he is quite a
nice chap. (Hi Ya Ron.) In the event I have not received or seen the
pictures 0001 or 2,3 or 4. but I do have a Emma White and maybe could
identify had I seen it. Cheers Ronbow.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Antonio Ariza
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] bees
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 16:00

Ok, so the flowers don't last long but, unlike most orchids, Catasetums
(and Gongoras, which are my other great passion at the moment) will
flower 2 to 3 times every year from each newly produced pseudobulb. Not
all of the species do this, but it still makes them worthwhile to me. I
guess I find them more fascinating with their strange shapes,
interesting "perfumes" and natural history than the mass produced
hybrids of other genera (of which I also grow a few I have to admit).

My Catasetum osculatum flowers were definitely starting to fade this
morning, so I had some fun triggering the pollen "firing" mechanism off
all the flowers this morning. I ended up with nearly a dozen pollinia
neatly stuck to my index finger. Hmmm, maybe I should find out if we
have one of those cameras able to take several dozen pictures per second
in our media department, in which case I'll try to film the process next
time.

Regards

Tony

>>> "Jean Lewis" 04/11/2005 09:16 >>>
Thank you for the information on bees Antonio I find it fascinating and
continue to marvel at the ways of nature! I agree about the DVD/VHS - it
is a wonderful film and well worth buying to watch again and again. I
love orchids but have never and will never try a Catasetum. Mine need to
produce flowers that last longer and preferably those that don't take up
too much space. Jean

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Semi Hydro and Phals
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 19:35

To avoid confusion in future could we agree that I shall be referred to as
Ron N and he will be referred to as Ron B?

Ron N

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: I though you might like to see this.
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 20:15

Hello All. Relative to Semi Hydrocultura maybe some who have not see it will find it interesting. Ronbow.
I found this at the First Rays Orchids website (www.firstrays.com) -- Welcome to First Rays Orchids. See it here: http://www.firstrays.com/free_info.htm

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ron Bower
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: PH/coductivty Meter
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 22:05

Hello,
I am looking for a Ph and conductivity meter and would be grateful for advice as to reliable makers and from whom they can be obtained,as well of course any advice that you think would be helpful. Ronbow

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Paul Johnson
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Catasetums.
Date: Fri, 04 Nov 2005 23:50

The bee "lecture" by Mr. Ariza is generally fine as a condensation of
the stereotypical information on euglossine bee/orchid relationships
as presented in the older horticultural literature, except for a
minor point. However, I do not blame Mr. Ariza, as much of the
scientific literature is a bit obscure, and since most of it is
entomological there is little attention given to bee biology by
horticultural orchidologists. Modern analysis of the data collected
by field biologists working with bees and the pertinent orchids over
the last 30 years shows quite clearly the opposite situation. This
urban mythology was reviewed discussed by Roubik and Hanson in their
2004 book "Orchid bees of tropical America: Biology and field
guide." A few pertinent quotes may suffice:

p. 84 - "Male euglossines pollinate nearly 10% of the Neotropical
orchids. . .primarily large-flowered orchids at lower altitudes - all
members of the subtribes Catasetinae and Stanhopeinae, the
Chondrorhyncha complex, many Lycastinae and Zygopetalinae, and some
Oncidiinae."

p. 98 - "Possibly less than 10% of the orchid species use a single
species of pollinator." And, "Almost half of the orchid genera use
more than one bee genus, and each can maintain a similar level of
mutualism."

p. 102 - "Just as most orchids attract several euglossine species,
most euglossine species visit more than one species of orchid."
". . .each euglossine species visited, on average, five orchid
species." Meanwhile, five bee species ". . .visited from 8-13
species [of orchid]." "Recent data suggest that only four orchids in
central Panama have a single, specialized pollinator. . ."

p. 104 - "In central Panama, approximately one-third of the
associations between euglossines and orchids were loose associations
- the two mutualists were not always found together." ". . .there
are a few instances in which orchid and bee distributions coincide."
". . . in many other cases the orchid has a more restricted
distribution than does its principal pollinator." "Nor do flower
production and pollinator activity always coincide."

On top of this, published observations of bees at chemical bait
stations and flowers in the field indicate that less than 1-5% of the
bees observed possess pollinaria.

In sum, there is little, if any, high quality evidence that indicates
any close associations between any euglossine bee species and any
orchid species.

In all fairness, I should note that I am an entomologist, that the
authors and I once schooled together, and that Hanson and I continue
to collaborate on some studies in Costa Rica, including euglossine
bees and orchids.

Paul

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sharon's Swan orchid.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 00:15

Gotcha Rocky, neither do stone clippings!
Sharon

Roger Grier wrote:

The only thing that I would be against is Sphagnum moss. And I say this with a bit of cheek..........Sphagnum moss don't grow up trees do it???

Kind regards, Rocky.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Sharon has fallen into my trap.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 09:35

Mornin' Sharon,

"Said the spider to the fly".

Sharon, I have written many words about stone chippings etc. The thing is Sharon, of course Sphagnum Moss is not found in trees, but, and this is where a bit of science comes in, stone chippings are as hard and long lasting as the bark on a LIVING tree. Stone chippings if you look at them, and this is to stamp down on the 'Bark is beautiful' brigade, are the same size and shape as pieces of bark.

Would you like me to E-mail you direct with my article?

Kind regards, Rocky.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon's Swan orchid.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 12:05

Spagnum moss don't grow up trees ? It does grow over the exposed roots of
trees on boggy foreshores - and quite a lot of other mosses do grow up
trees.

Geoff.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: jns tropic
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Off subject: hurricanes
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 14:35

We were mugged. Three hurricanes in one year.
Katrina was a category 1 storm and did a lot of
damage. Rita was a category 1 storm and did very
little damage (every thing had been trimmed in the
first storm). Then along came Wilma, another catalog
1 storm. This one really slaughtered the vegetation,
with minor structure damage. In the first storm we
lost our electricity for 6 days, then one day for
Rita, and 7 days for Wilma. Now 12 days later a
little more then 80% of the homes have their power.
For us when the lights come back the storm is over.
You can see more storm pictures at:
http://groups.msn.com/tropicalgardenpics/wilmathehurricane.msnw?Page=1
It was about a week before I could start working the
greenhouse.
ERRATA: My picture of Bro. sanguiana was named
incorrectly. It should have read Bro. nigrilensis.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Silvio a Beccara
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Semi Hydro and Phals
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 15:10

OK for me...
Silvio

> To avoid confusion in future could we agree that I shall be referred to as
> Ron N and he will be referred to as Ron B?
>
> Ron N

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Dracula growing culture.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 15:35

Geoff,
I wonder if you, or anyone else on the forum, know where I can find (or can
send) an image of the moth, Xanthopea morganii, with the long proboscis,
that pollinates Darwin's Angraecum sesquipedale. Ours is just beginning to
flower and the nectar tube is nearly at full length; impressive stuff!) and
I'd love to see the beast that Darwin predicted. I've searched the web and
there are lots of mentions of it but apparently no pics (or should I say, no
pics are apparent!)
John Stanley

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: some photos
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 17:20

It's been a foul day here so I have been taking some photos inside. These are a few of them. I am particularly pleased with the Laelia pumila as it is the first to flower of a batch I deflasked 3 years ago.

Why are orange flowers so difficult to photograph?

Andy

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Interesting site
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 17:25

In the latest Orchid Review they mentioned a web site www.fmnh.org/plantguides . It was mentioned for Orchids but what an amazing site for anyone interested in plants and animals.Regards

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Darwin's moth.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 18:00

Hi there John,

I never did forget the moth's name, so just punch in Xanthopan Morgani praedicta and you will see it in many Internet pages.

Regards, Rocky.

P.S. I always ask this question to people who are interested..........it even applies to our moth pollinated wild orchids.

Why is the nectar always in just the very bottom of the tube/nectary?

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: RonNew's orchid.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 18:10

Hi RonNew,

Ron, your orchid that you would like to put a name to, and as Geoff says, our memories get slightly slower with age!!!

Punch in Colmanara 'Jungle Monarch' and see which of the many photos is like yours.

I think that is what it may be.

Regards, Rocky.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: moth
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 18:25

John here is the url to a photo of the moth you mention. It is also in Encarta Encyclopaedia if you have it. Jean

http://encarta.msn.com/media_461530192_761578331_-1_1/Darwin's_Hawk_Moth.html

The two Ron's why don't we have Ron and Ronbow? Jean

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Andy
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 18:25

You put the miserable weather to excellent use Andy. What fabulous orchids and wonderful photos. Quite cheered me up on a miserable evening. Thanks for sharing such a delight. Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Dracula growing culture.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 19:10

For an image of Xanthopea morgani praedicta - ( now known as Macrosilia ,
rather than Xanthopea ) - see Orchid Review , Volume 113, Page 190.

Next question ?

( the difficult , we do immediately , the impossible sometimes takes a
little longer )

Geoff.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 19:15

I am very happy to see you on-line again Jordan .

I guess you don't believe in global warming , or the supposed connection
between climate change (aka the earth warming up, and increased hurricane
activity ) - neither do I , on both counts , by the way. But if you did,
you'd have the "for sale " signs up....

Lets hope its just a blip , and next year will see a quieter season.

Geoff.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] some photos
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 19:15

Nice pics Andy.

Your cinnabarina , by the way, is now a Sophronitis - and so is the pumila.

Is yopur labiata scented ?

Geoff.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] some photos
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 19:20

p.s. I hadn't thought orange quite so difficult ?
Maybe its got an infra-red reflectivity which the film or sensor sees, and
you don't.
Personally I always shoot digitally in RAW format , which gives me so much
control to correct images so that with the end product, what I see on the
screen is what I saw and remember.

Geoff.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Angraecum sesquipedale - its moth?
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 19:35

Ooooops! Bit of a dog's breakfast first time around. No idea what I did. Sorry Geoff!
Second time lucky . . .

I wonder if anyone on the forum, knows where I can find ( an image of the moth, Xanthopea morganii, with the long proboscis, > that pollinates Darwin's Angraecum sesquipedale. Ours is just beginning to flower and the nectar tube is nearly at full length; impressive stuff!) and I'd love to see the beast that Darwin predicted. I've searched the web and there are lots of mentions of it but apparently no pics (or should I say, no pics are apparent!)
John Stanley

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Xanthopan morgani praedicta
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 19:40

The only representation I have seen is in the Golden Nature Guide - Orchids. -an American published pocket book. I could post a picture if you can't find the book. Regards

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Names please?
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 21:00

Thanks, Dennis, but on close inspection, it does not look as though it has
any phalaenopsis in it

Ron

dennis READ wrote:

Ron, It looks very similar to my Dendrobium Emma White but there were many
mericlones of white Dendrobium phalaenopsis hybrids on sale a couple of
years ago. Regards

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Janet Fabricant
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] some photos
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 22:50

Hi Andy,
Your photos are lovely and your orchids magnificent. Isn't it exciting when one of your flasked plants actually flower?
Wirey hugs and love and xxx and licks from Janet and Asta in Boynton Beach, Florida

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Janet Fabricant
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 22:50

I'm interested in knowing where you live. Unfortunately your note wasn't
signed so I can't call you by name. We are in Boynton Beach
Wirey hugs and love and xxx and licks from Janet and Asta

"jns tropic" wrote:

Re: Off subject: hurricanes

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Xanthopan morgani praedicta
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 23:10

Gee! That was quick! Thanks for the offer Dennis. I'll wait a day or two and see what materialises then, if nothing turns up I'll take advantage of the offer. You're the only one so far. Amazing that it is such a well know thing yet so few pics!
Cheers
John

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Darwin's moth.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 23:20

Thanks Rocky,
I guess I had Xanthopan mis-spelt as Xanthopea and I hadn't the subsp name. Odd though, because usually, if you are fairly near the search engine has the wit to make likely suggestions.But thanks

As for your question;
a-I don't know
b-guessing I'd suggest it is so that the wrong moths can't get at the nectar. The 'wrong' moths might not have the correct body shape or posture or other habits that might render them less effective than the evolved species.
Anyone else a suggestion?

John

Roger Grier

Why is the nectar always in just the very bottom of the tube/nectary?

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Not Dracula! but Xanthopea or macrosilia.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 23:25

Thanks Geoff for being telepathic.
and especially for the taxonomic revision details.
Next question? How did I make such a mess of the email address and subject
line in the first place?
And next; do you know who first coined the phrase, close to yours "The
impossible at once, miracles a little longer"?
Cheers
John

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Orchids
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sharon has fallen into my trap.
Date: Sat, 05 Nov 2005 23:45

Hello Roger

Sorry to come in on your Email to Sharon but would love a copy of your
Article if i may.
Many Thanks
Les

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Rocky n stone n bark n orchids n traps
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 02:25

Rocky (with apologies)and Sharon,

Sorry Rocky but I can't resist! No doubt you'll get your own back! However, most 'stone' (rock) that will chip (ie.,is brittle enough to fracture rather than merely crumble) may be softer, as hard as, or harder than bark. Also, it may be less durable, as durable or more durable than bark. Probably more importantly, it may be less porous, as porous or more porous than bark. Then there's permeability and water retention. Also, some may allow ions of calcium, magnesium, sulphur, iron or other elements to be liberated to possible advantage or disadvantage. Rock is not a single stuff. Barks from different sources are probably also similarly diverse but someone else may like to expand on that.

Perhaps the most important point is that a few orchids are absolutely intolerant, many seem pretty tolerant and most are extraordinarily tolerant of our opinions of what's best for them!

After all, mostly we don't keep them in a natural environment and many do seem to appreciate the water retentive qualities of Sphagnum. Certainly the best growers in our orchid soc. seem to think so. Anyway, who keeps their orchids up trees?

Come to think of it, traps are very easy, fairly easy or pretty difficult to fall into! I sense I'm now in free fall!

John

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Sharon Williams
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sharon has fallen into my trap.
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 03:25

You bet! My email is williams.sharon@shaw.ca
Sharon
(and my website is www.sharonlynnwilliams.com if you are an art lover!)

Roger Grier wrote:

Would you like me to E-mail you direct with my article?

Kind regards, Rocky.

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: jan
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes - and people's beliefs
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 08:45

Geoffrey Hands wrote:
> I am very happy to see you on-line again Jordan .
>
> I guess you don't believe in global warming , or the supposed connection
> between climate change (aka the earth warming up, and increased hurricane
> activity ) - neither do I , on both counts , by the way. But if you did,
> you'd have the "for sale " signs up....
>
> Lets hope its just a blip , and next year will see a quieter season.
>
> Geoff.
>
I can see why people don't want to believe global warming is happening;
I don't either. I don't want to lose snow in the winter; the Amzonian
rainforest, the whales etc etc. But it is happening, sadly.

I have never been one for sensationalism, but even when you cut away all
that and all the eco-pessimism, the truth is still: a large majority of
those who know what they are talking about share certain views about
this. It is happening, despite all the hype from the likes of Bjørn
Lomborg. Yes, it is true - there is some uncertainty in all these
measurements; the same is true about all other scientific research. It
is contrary to the nature of science to talk about absolute ceratinty -
that certainty belongs in the realm of religion. Apart from that, I find
it oddly ironic that the people who say they are sceptic about, say, our
role in climate change, are the selfsame people who eg. claim to be
Christians (ie they believe in something because of a collection of
stories more than 2000 years old), or who buy cosmetics because the
advert says it has magical properties, or who buy lotto tickets because
they get a 1 in 100000000000 chance to win.

No, climate change is happening, and it happens because of our
lifestyle. We don't have to face up to the consequences, perhaps, but
our children and grandchildren will. It is also worth remembering that
the people who are most vociferously against adding two and two in the
climate debate are the very same that have the greatest interest in
keeping the status quo. Car makers don't want everybody to stop driving
cars, oil companies don't want us to save energy, and so on.

/jan

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Andy's photos
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 09:00

Mornin' Andy,

Very good photos, and very nice orchids, I'm sure you are very pleased with them, I know I would be.

Brassocattleya Binosa 'Wabash Valley'. I had a Brassocattleya Binosa 'Kirk' for quite some years, and then in the space of a couple of years it just went downhill and died, for no apparent reason.

I wonder if any of our members have had similar experiences with this cross.

Regards, Rocky.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Names please?
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 09:15

Ron N, The species is Dendrobium phalaenopsis also known as Dendrobium
bigibbum var. phalaenopsis.
D. Emma White is a hybrid with about 50% in its make up. Regards

"Ronald Newstead" wrote:

> Thanks, Dennis, but on close inspection, it does not look as though it has
> any phalaenopsis in it

------------------------------------------------------------

From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Sharon has fallen into my trap.
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 09:25

Hi Rocky,
May I also request a copy?
Told you that you could probably get your won back on me!
Cheers
John

Roger Grier wrote:

Sharon, I have written many words about stone chippings etc. The thing is Sharon, of course Sphagnum Moss is not found in trees, but, and this is where a bit of science comes in, stone chippings are as hard and long lasting as the bark on a LIVING tree. Stone chippings if you look at them, and this is to stamp down on the 'Bark is beautiful' brigade, are the same size and shape as pieces of bark.

Would you like me to E-mail you direct with my article?

--------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: nectar
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 09:25

I guess it's gravity Roger:) Jean

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Laelia pumila
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 10:30

Hi Andy and all,

I had my eye on a Laelia pumila in an Orchid Nursery and two days ago I did buy it.

As Andy said, why are orange flowers so difficult to show the correct colours. Well, my Laelia pumila is nothing like the colours that I show, they are a much darker mauvish pink all round.

However, I took the close up to show the nice little insect lure just inside the lip.

The scent from this flower is similar to another orchid that I have, but can't put a name to it at the moment, and it is faintly acrid or tangy.

When the flower has finished I will wash and clean it and re-pot it, and hope for better things next year.

Regards, Rocky.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Moths with long tongues.
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 11:10

Hi John,

My reason about the long nectary/spur with only the bottom holding the nectar is this:

If the tube/nectary was filled to the brim, a moth could hover well away from the flower/pollinia and drink to its heart's content..........without ever coming into contact with the pollinia.

Next time you have the chance to find a Greater Butterfly orchid in the countryside, have a good look at it. The liquid only fills the bottom quarter of an inch, so the moth has to get up really close to shove its tongue into the tube, and by doing so its head brushes against one of the pollinia which are situated either side of the tube opening.

If you look closely you will see a 'moustache' just above the opening of the tube..........that's the tiny hairs from the moths head which have brushed against the sticky stigmatic surface.

Hope the photo does it justice!

Regards, Rocky.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon has fallen into my trap.
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 11:20

Hi Les,

Article attached as you requested. Hope you like it.

I do have some scanned items that I am sure you would like to read, both =
about culture in stone chippings, but they are fairly large in Kb's, so =
if you are on Broadband then no problem.

Please let me know.

Raining like hell here and blowing a gale.

Kind regards, Rocky.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Digest 2005 Volume 105
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 12:20

Hello Geoff,

Please apologize my belated reply, but I was very busy last week and
that‹s why I found time for writing only now.
I agree to your advice to Lynn only partially.
You generalized wrote ›roots need air about them too“. Although you can
read this generalized opinion in 90% of the orchid literature all over
the world „ generalized it isn‹t true!
True is „ aerial grown roots need air surrounding them „ other grown
roots don‹t.
I wrote in my mail from 19.12. 2004:
Hello Geoff,
I agree with you, it is the normal situation for epiphytes to have their
roots surrounded by air.
- In this case the roots are coated with velamen and have chlorophyll
inside the tip of the roots (type I).
- Inside a potting medium (without light) the velamen and the
chlorophyll disappears and the roots are bare and pale (type II).
- Roots of epiphyts are very adaptable to different environments and so
they can live and grow without any surrounding air, too (type III).
Depending on growing with or without light, the roots are greenish and
coated or pale and bare. You can see it as soon as roots are growing in
water (see my attached photo of Paphs roots which have been growing in
pure water over months).
Without the ability to live without air and light a growing of epiphyts
in Hydro-culture would not be possible.
One thing is important! Normally the roots of epiphyts are able to
change their type from one to another if they can 'occupy' the other
environment they have to grow in. They are able to adapt their form to
the function.
But roots are unable to change their form (type) if they are forced from
one to another environment. Usually then they will die or at least stop
growing.
Regards from Germany, Rudolf.

Obviously nobody was interested because there was no reply.
Principally you can grow orchids in every kind of container „ even in a
glass vase. The one and only problem to fight here is the growing of
Algae‹s.
To prove my statement I attach two photos of roots from orchid plants I
grow in full Hydro-culture. In both cases roots were surrounded by air
for the very first time - when I took the photos. I keep Rossioglossum
grande still outside even with dropping of night temperature down to 4C.
The plant and its roots look healthy although the roots are all the time
underneath the surface of the nutrient solution.
@ RonBo :
As an indoor grower I went back to grow my orchids of different Genera
in Hydro-culture - except Paphs. I started an attempt with Paphs 4 years
ago and it worked, too. I gave that plant for a present to my mother in
law and it is still healthy growing and flowering.
Hydro-culture is very convenient „ you don‹t have care about your plants
too often, you‹ve got to water let‹s say every 4-6 weeks.
Another advantage is with the use of an inert potting medium there will
be no root rotting because of too high salt (nutrient) concentration
inside the pot
Among my Hydro-culture grown plants are some Phals (species and
Hybrids), too. They get on with the Hydro-culture very well as well with
SHC in case you intend to grow them in this way.

Best regard from Germany, Rudolf.

Geoffrey Hands wrote:

It is very difficult to keep an orchid alive in a glass container -
stores put them in them because they look pretty - but they spell death
to the plant.
You must give the plant water , but roots need air about them too . Move
it into a similar size plant pot with drainageholes - and when you water
( like, holding the pot under the kitchen cold tap, say once a week) the
water should pour out of the drain holes. If it doesn't pour out like
that, then its days are numbered.
Of course, once the pot has drained, you can put the whole thing into an
ornamental container - a glass vase or whatever - just as long as it
allows air to get to the roots .
Geoff.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: lynne edwards
Sent: 31 October 2005 15:41
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: [OrchidTalk] RE: Digest 2005 Volume 105
Hi there. have treated myself to my first Orchid, always loved them.
It is flowering well, but am a bit concerned about very small glass
container it was supplied in. Do I put it in a bigger container, also
what fertiliser do I use. Do they have to outgrow their pot.
Regards Lynne

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Laelia pumila
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 14:00

Hi all,

As it's still raining and blowing I decided to scan my Laelia pumila so that the colour is more perfect.

So here it is.

Rocky.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: John in free fall!
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 16:35

Hi John,

Just got back from a nice walk through the New Forest..........of course it is very wet, but the wife and I enjoyed it. Saw one very large fungi, and of course did not put the camera in my pocket.

John, your last E-mail did make me chuckle, and I did enjoy the banter. For sure that is what 'Orchid Talk' is all about.

Perhaps I did not use the correct name to describe what I use, and to this end I have attached a photo. They are I believe Basalt pieces. Very hard, will outlive you and I. Do hold some 'damp' as the gardeners of long ago described it. Lovely word. I can pot an orchid in the stone pieces and see that it will have maybe three or four years before it reaches the far side and will need re-potting, and I will have no worry whatsoever wondering when the compost will rot down or do some injury to the roots.

Since I have been using only rain water with an added solution of watered down horse manure, the leaves have lost the markings from the tap water use, and they do look very good.

Kind regards, Rocky.

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From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Information required.
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 16:50

Hi all,

Has anyone had any dealings with 'Boden Orchids' of 48 Waverley, Woodside, Telford.

I have just looked at his website and I am very interested in some of his Phallys.

No order form is shown, and some of the web pages are under construction, so I have E-mailed him but no reply as yet.

Rocky.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Names please?
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 16:55

Ron , Dendrobium phalaenopsis is not a Phalaenopsis in the sense of the moth
orchid - nor is it a hybrid between two genera - Dendrobium and Phalaenopsis

It is a species of Dendrobium. Actually the correct name , according to the
latest (?) taxonomic update is D.bigibbum, var.superbum . But commonly known
as D.phalaenopsis.

Geoff.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Thailand Hints
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 17:10

I wonder if you are going with Peter Williams ? He is the only one I know
who organises and leads orchid tours in Thailand - and I believe he also
does one in Laos or Cambodia now. If it is , give him my regards.

Clothing ; there are 18 (?) different types of forest in Thailand, and few
are the hot and steamy , thick with insects type - in fact I've never seen
that type in Thailand,
I don't think it will be very hot , this late in the year , and personally I
would take light-weight clothing but keep shorts and short-sleeved shirts
for resorts and sight-seeing days. For forest I would always wear sensible
shoes, long trousers , and long -sleeved shirts , although thin easily
washed material - esepecially if like me, you lie on the ground to take
photos of terrestrials ( I like Rohan clothes).
Although this technically the dry season, you can still encounter a shower
occasionally, so need some rain protection ( especially for cameras etc ! ).

Doi Inthanon is the highest mountain - according to a plaque on the top it
is 2333.333 metres high ( the last two places of decimals amuses me quite
immoderately ) - over 7000 feet up , and one year there was a frost on the
top one night in January ( not a rarity , although not common )and even
down at 4800 feet in a lodge run by one of the hill tribes, where the
walls are made of bamboo canes , the temperature in our room dropped to
about 7 or 8 deg. C. and we were very cold .
By the way, you may see a great display of Coelogyne nitida on the top if
you are not a shade too early.
You may find orchids on the ground anywhere - fallen from the trees in a
storm ; they die in the inadequate light . Of course, you will appreciate
that bringing them home is not allowed .

Hope this helps - have a great time.

Geoff.

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From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes - and people's beliefs
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 17:35

I am sceptic about global warming, and I am not a Christian.
I'm sceptical because :
1. To know whether the earth is warming or cooling , you need to know its
mean ( average ) temperature.
2. We have only been able to measure the earths mean temperature since the
first Sputnik.
3. It is universally agreed by scientists involved in this, that the
methodology used for measuring the earth's temperature for the first 12
years of the space age , was flawed, and the data is unreliable.
4. So what are we left with ? I lack precise dates, but I'd guess not a
lot more than 20 years of figures. Very short for such a conclusion to be
drawn
5. From 1990 until 1997 the earth actually COOLED by more than 1/4 deg.C. (
and remember that the warming measured before that was slightly less than
1/2 deg C.
6. The professor concerned with the subject - I forget his exact title, at
Imperial College - usually thought to be in the top 2 Universitys for
science in UK - says that there are perhaps 2000 factors affecting global
climate, of which we can recognise less than half, think we understand a
tenth, and probably don't really understand at all - and he doesn't believe
in global warming either.
7. One of the major factors in the temperature of the earth is the output of
the sun. This is cyclical, and in the 10 year period from about 1997 to 2007
is ( or is expected to be) at a the highest level for a hundred years.
8. Fact ; we are considered to be in an inter-glacial period at present.
This means the warming up which happens between successive ice-ages. The
next ice-age is considered to be inevitable. The best science can't tell
when it will be - maybe in 100 years time, maybe in 40,000 years time.
9. In short, man's activities are insignificant, and trivial compared to the
forces of nature.
10. Clearly the trend at the moment is for us to have warmer winters and
better summers ; that I agree. But once you say global warming , you add in
a sub-plot implying first that it is due solely to increased carbon dioxide
in the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels ( everyone who believes that
should sign up to changing over to 100% generation of electricity by nuclear
means, and tax concessions for electric cars . Why not ? I support both and
I don't even believe in the global warming hsyteria ! ) , and secondly that
if it is done by man, we should stop it, and all go back to candles,
bicycles and some wonderful pre-industrial-age utopia. In fact we would go
forward to a dark, cold slum of starving people if we went far down that
road. BUT in fact , one event such as Mount Helene ( or was it Mount
St.Helen ? ) which blew its top a few years ago put as much CO2 into the
atmosphere in just one volcanic eruption as did all of man's activities in
the year !. ( and by the way is it true that it takes more energy to
construct a wind turbine than it will generate in its life time ? I have
read that several times, and never seen it challenged - I suspect it is
true).

Geoff.

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From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Xanthopan morgani praedicta
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 17:40

Hi Dennis,
As you will have seen, I have received a couple of sources for a pic of the moth and so you needn'y go to the trouble of scanning/photographing one for me. Hwever, many thanks for the offer and for being first off the mark!
Geoff has even got me up to date on the name of the beast.
Cheers
John

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From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Thailand Hints
Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2005 20:55

Geoff, can't find Patrick's email but he may find the attached useful for info. (I prefixed it with AAAs so that i could find it easily in the folder!)
(Note that the header font has become swapped for illegible script in the attaching and that in Peter's final edit the point was made that orchids available for bringing home have the paperwork -CITES etc - dealt with.)
John Stanley

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From: Orchids
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Sharon has fallen into my trap.
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 01:25

Hi Roger
Yes Roger i am on Broadband and would be very interested in the scanned
items also the article you sent was great.
Many Thanks
Les

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From: jan
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes - and people's beliefs
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 06:50

Dear Geoff,

There is more to global warming than measuring the mean temperature; and
apart from that, we don't need satelites for that, all we need is to
measure the temperature all over the globe and find the average; the
satelites only make it easier. And if there was a flaw in the
measurements in the beginning, this may be something that can be
corrected in the calculations - a bit like if you have a thermometer
that always shows 5 degrees below the actual temperature, you just add
those 5 degrees to what you read on the thermometer.

However, we can measure historical - and even prehistoric - temperatures
and a lot of other things from the fossil records. Icekernels drilled on
Greenland, Antarctica and glaciers give a good and very precise idea
about the climate back to several ten thousand years, just to mention
one source. In fact, the fossil record lets us see a lot of things about
climate and environment in prehistoric times, such as which plants and
animals lived where, the level of CO2 in the athmosphere and sea etc
etc. All these things point more or less in the same direction: our
climate has been getting warmer for the last several thousand years,
coiciding with our activities on earth.

That in itself is of course only a hint about climate change; the future
hasn't happened yet, but this is where climate models come in. A climate
model is in principle the same as a weather forecast, and you may ask
why on should attach any significance to what comes out of it, seeing
how the weather forecasts are always wildly off the mark even if you try
to look 1 month ahead. There are several reasons.

Firstly, a weather forecast tries to predict the weather on a very
specific time, like 'Monday noon' and in a very small area like London.
A climate model operates with much larger areas and timeperiods; it is a
lot more reliable to predict the average temperature for a whole decade
than trying to png it down to one day. Also, climate models take into
account a lot of factors that weather forecasts don't, such as ice
cover, land use, CO2 production and consumption etc. As you say perhaps
up to several thousand factors.

To check whether a climate model is valid, it is normally used to
'predict' the climate as it has been measured from the fossil records.
If the calculations match the records from the past, it seems reasonable
to assume that its predictions about the future are correct too. And
most climate models show that our production of CO2 is one of the
primary factors that drives the global warming.

You say that "man's activities are insignificant, and trivial compared
to the forces of nature" - this is what they said about pollution in the
sixties, about overfishing, rainforest clearing etc. Unfortunately it
isn't the case - the fossil records again show that animals have a
significant impact on the environment, and sometimes a species has been
able to influence things on a grand scale (just take eg. the little
animals that created the chalk under much of England). Mankind is
probably the animal species that has had the greatest impact of all so far.

It is true, of course, that the output of CO2 from volcanoes is far
bigger than what we produce; but I think you can compare this to a
household budget. If one earns, say, £2000 each month and each month
spends £2001, there will be an ever growing deficit; this is roughly
similar to how our CO2 budget has been through the ages - the CO2 levels
were once higher than now, but plantlife has comsumed more than was
produced. If the household suddenly wins £12000 on lotto, but otherwise
continues as before, the £12000 will be used up in the end, and the
deficit will grow once again; but if the household starts to earn a
constant extra income, say just £10 each month, then their constant
deficit will become a growing surplus - this is what we're doing by
burning fossil fuels: we tip the balance the wrong way.

You can call this hysteria if you feel more comfortable that way; to my
mind, however, hysteria means that I should be running around screaming
myeahd off, which I don't. Rather, I say this is a serious prospect, let
us try to do something about it. It will be hard to stop burning fossil
fuel like there was no tomorrow, but it can be done if we are serious
about it, and it doesn't have to be the cold and miserable nightmare you
put forth. Right now we're living beyond our means, so to speak;
personally I'd rather live a bit more frugally if it means that our
descendants will have better life for it.

/jan

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From: Silvio a Beccara
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Thailand Hints
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 08:40

Hi,

>  Doi Inthanon is the highest mountain - according to a plaque on the top it
> is 2333.333 metres high

this is beyond any immaginable GPS accuracy (BTW the elevation of Mt. Everest
is still under debate)... would be nice to ask them how they gauged the
elevation!
Cheers

Silvio

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Silvio a Beccara
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] John in free fall!
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 08:45

Hi Rocky,

I do exactly the same, but with clay pebbles... they are better than stones at
witholding "damp" and making it diffuse. And they are much lighter, so that
roots don't get pressed too much.

Kind regards

Silvio

> Hi John,
>
> Perhaps I did not use the correct name to describe what I use, and to this
> end I have attached a photo. They are I believe Basalt pieces.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Information required.
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 10:15

I did not know that Mike Boden was still in existence. I bought from him
many times when I lived in the Midlands - his plants are superbly grown.
Did I say something about phalaenopsis grown to perfection under artificial
lifght ? That was Mike. But that was at least 10 years ago.
I shall be most interested to hear how you get on, and to have an e-mail
address if you find one - if he has one .

Geoff.

Roger Grier wrote:

Hi all,

Has anyone had any dealings with 'Boden Orchids' of 48 Waverley, Woodside,
Telford.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: some photos
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 10:45

Thanks Geoff

I didn't know about the reclassification - Do I take it that it's also a Sophronitis tenebrosa that I've got in bud?

The C labiata has a faint sweet perfume - reminds me of bluebells.

Andy

Geoffrey Hands wrote:

Nice pics Andy.

Your cinnabarina , by the way, is now a Sophronitis - and so is the pumila.

Is your labiata scented ?

Andy

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: some photos
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 11:00

Hi Janet

Thanks. Yes it is very exciting. This is only the second time. I bought my first flasks 3 1/2 years ago. I have already flowered Laelia (Sophronitis?) harpophylla and Onc batemannianum is just about to open - that was only deflasked 2 years ago! For the first couple of years nothing much seemed to happen ( I hadn't realised that the pumila and harpophylly are such small plants) but since things started moving I have bought the odd flask every few months. I gather Cattleyas are very slow and so far have not tried them although they are my favourite genus and next on my list.

Does anyone know if there's a guide somewhere of the approximate times from flask to flower?

all the best

Andy

Janet Fabricant wrote:

Hi Andy,
Your photos are lovely and your orchids magnificent. Isn't it exciting when one of your flasked plants actually flower?
Wirey hugs and love and xxx and licks from Janet and Asta in Boynton Beach, Florida

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Laelia pumila
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 11:05

Colour is very difficult with photography and monitors - I have spent 3
hours this morning calibrating my screen with the SpyderPlus 2 monitor, and
it is remarkable how my pictures now all look different.
The point is , that if I adjust the colour to look right on my monitor now,
it will look the same as when I did that before the monitor was calibrated,
but when I send that picture to the web - and to your screen - it will look
different in the two versions. And unless you have done the same ( doubtful,
unless you are really "into" the subject of colour ) who knows whther you
are looking at what I want you to see or not ?
I don't know any answer to this - call it a rhetorical question.

And for those who wonder why I bother , the answer is that if I want my
printer to produce what I see, then I need to have everything - camera,
scanner, monitor, and printer, all calibrated to the same standard, and
profiled for the sensor, paper, ink, printer driver etc. And this is one of
the steps in that routine..

Geoff.

Roger Grier wrote:

Hi all,

As it's still raining and blowing I decided to scan my Laelia pumila so that
the colour is more perfect.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: dennis READ
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Unusual Orchid
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 14:40

Here is a picture of a double Ida linguella. It has three sepals, two petals, one column but two lips. This is the only mal formed flower out of seven.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Andy Mckeown
Date: 07 Nov 2005 1215
Subject: flower spotting

My C bowringiana is just opening - over 30 flowers on 2 spikes but even
before fully open they are ruined with little fungal spots. What's the
remedy to prevent this?

Andy

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Stone pieves and Clay pebbles.
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 16:05

Hi there Silvio,

I am pleased to hear that you are using a 'medium' that does not rot or decay.

My stone pieces have plenty of gaps in between each other, so the roots do not get pressed/squashed, but they just go where they want.

Kind regards, Rocky.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Flower spotting.
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 16:10

Hi Andy,

Don't know the answer to your flower spotting, BUT, this is why I nearly always try to have any WHITE, or FLIMSY flowered orchid out of the greenhouse and into the conservatory or house.

So, do you think it is to do with just a bit too much humidity.

Regards, Rocky.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Silvio a Beccara
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Stone pieves and Clay pebbles.
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 16:30

Hi Rocky,

I was referring to the fact that roots on the bottom of a pot may get pressed
by the weight of all the stones that sit on top of them. Besides, I think
that rock chips are not very porous so as to let water and nutrients through,
are they?

Kind regards

Silvio

----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Jon Loose
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes - and people's beliefs
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 16:30

Dear Jan

Nicely said.

I would just like to add that we are having such an impact because there are
so many of us as well as the fact that in industrial countries we use energy
as though it is almost infinitely available (including many of us orchid
growers growing plants unsuitable for our temperate climates).

We could halve the total global requirement for fuel by halving the number
of people (not easy). Why do we need to have a constantly growing world
population? Let us think in the long term ... say a thousand years from now.
Will we still be increasing our energy use and population? I suspect that we
would find the same fate as other species which outgrow their eco-system. If
there is no brake on growth a crisis occurs and sudden collapse. We are
cleverer than that - or are we?

Jonathon

---------------------------------------------------------------

From: nancy
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Fwd: flower spotting
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 17:05

Hi Andy -
I would suspect thrips damage, which can look like
tiny clear or tan sunken areas, rather than fungus.
Insidious and invisible, these sucking insects can
damage the buds while they are forming, but the
results are really disappointing flowers.
I use powdered Orthene (the stuff we use for 'fahr
ants' a few times a season - this also kills scale.
Regards - Nancy

~~~~~~~~~~~~
"My mother had a great deal of trouble with me,
but I think she enjoyed it."
---Mark Twain

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: some photos
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 17:20

Yes, all the Brazilian Laelias and Laelia (onl) hybrids are now
Sophronitis.
The mexican ones - ( one of which , at least, is found in Costa Rica - 'cos
I've seen it in the wild ) which always were anamolous , and separated by a
gap of several thousand miles from the Bazilian ones, are still Laelias.

And Cattleyas Skinnerii, Bowringiana, and aurantiaca are now Guarianthe.

If and when it is decided what to do about multi-generic hybrids ( 2 quite
sound proposals are on the table) I'll post on the subject.

Geoff.

Andy Mckeown wrote:

I didn't know about the reclassification - Do I take it that it's also a
Sophronitis tenebrosa that I've got in bud?

The C labiata has a faint sweet perfume - reminds me of bluebells.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes - and people's beliefs
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 17:30

/jan said :-
we don't need satelites for that, all we need is to measure the
temperature all over the globe and find the average
but climate scientoists , as opposed to environmentalists
with an axe to grind, say " no, its impossible"

we can measure historical - and even prehistoric - temperatures and
a lot of other things
but those are indications of temperatures in just one place.
You can't tell the temperature of the earth by standing oin one spot -
historically or otherwise.

sorry /jan , if you believe that, you'll believe anything. Most
climate forecasting is taking a graph of the recent past, and extending it
into the future. People who did that kind of thing lost their shirts in
the South Sea Bubble, and similar events every few years - as they say -
ther's one born every minute. Do you recall Magnus Magnusson hosting a
program which solemnly told us that the next ice age was due to start in
1990 ? I do - it was based on this super accurate future forecasting.

In fact, whenever anyone tells me what is going to happen in 50 years time,
I say thank god, that's one thing I can cross off the list of possibilities
. People who forecast the fguture specifically are ALWAYS wrong. Otherwise
known as "sod's law"

Geoff.

-----------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Fwd: flower spotting
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 17:30

It's the humidity - but I don't know what you can do about this , at this
time of the year. Mine by the way, flowered a few weeks ago , and has now
gone over - but I'm happy to say its first cane was a little larger than the
preceding one ( when it arrived here) so I look forward to next year...

Geoff.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Flower spotting.
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 17:35

Very good advice - but of course this Cattleya is not in that category.

Geoff.

Roger Grier wrote:

Hi Andy,

Don't know the answer to your flower spotting, BUT, this is why I nearly
always try to have any WHITE, or FLIMSY flowered orchid out of the
greenhouse and into the conservatory or house.

So, do you think it is to do with just a bit too much humidity.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: aeranthes2
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: catts
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 17:40

Hi Jan! I'm with you all the way on climate change. We now recycle a great deal of our household rubbish. Well we don't but the Council does.
Andy - thanks for the reply. Yes my greenhouse temp is about the same as yours. I have long suspected it is something to do with light. I have spent a great deal of money on heaters, fans, shading etc but still I have trouble with Catts. I believe Laelias are treated the same way and I have one beauty which is at the back of the staging in a less bright spot. I have wondered for some time if they are getting too much light during the summer. It is more difficult here to give them shade than it is to give them light. I think you can see that I must be right as they usually flower but the plants themselves aren't up to much. Cheers - Jean

--------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Thailand Hints
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 23:15

If it is Peter, please give him my regards too.

Ron

Geoffrey Hands wrote:

I wonder if you are going with Peter Williams ? He is the only one I know
who organises and leads orchid tours in Thailand - and I believe he also
does one in Laos or Cambodia now. If it is , give him my regards.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Names please?
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 23:15

Thanks, Geoff. I feel better now!

Ron

Geoffrey Hands wrote:

Ron , Dendrobium phalaenopsis is not a Phalaenopsis in the sense of the moth
orchid - nor is it a hybrid between two genera - Dendrobium and Phalaenopsis

------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Names please?
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 23:15

Thanks again, Dennis!

Ron

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Ronald Newstead
To: Orchid Talk list
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Off subject: hurricanes - and people's beliefs
Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 23:40

Surely you are missing the point, Jan.
Climate change has been occurring since the world began, the Ice Age is well
known, for example. However, where the doubt exists is over the nature of
the cause and the remedy, if necessary,

Ron

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