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2005 Archived Messages


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MONTHDATEDATEDATEDATEMONTHDATEDATEDATEDATE
January 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 February 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-28
March 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 April 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
May 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 June 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30
July 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31 August 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
September 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 October 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31
November 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-30 December 1-7 8-14 15-21 22-31

May 1-7

From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: slugs - alls well that ends with prizes
Date: Sun, 01 May 2005 18:00


Congrats on the prizes.
And my local mollusc population tell me to add their compliments too.
Cheers
John S

Geoffrey Hands wrote:


(footnote - writing this after returning from a very long day at the OSGB show at Wisley- where ( dare I mention it ?) I got 3 firsts, 2 seconds and one third ) - and after a bottle of wine to celebrate and try and unwind after the drive . In vino veritas or what ? )



From: Rudolf Günnel
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE Asconcenda-Care
Date: Sun, 01 May 2005 18:05


Hello Pete,
I try to answer your queries as following.
Missing photo „ I assume you receive orchid-talk in the digest form.
Since last winter you get the digest form without any photos, images
etc.
Why it is so you can read up in a mail of the
webmaster dated of March, 20th 2005.
Cache-pot - I took the word from my electronic dictionary and
there was another word too „ ›plant pot holder“. With my own words I
would describe it as a decoration
pot. That means a pot of glazed clay, nowadays plastic too,
where you can put a normal flower pot in.
Temperature - I don‹t have a constant temperature of 22C in my rooms
and I think it isn‹t necessary. The room thermostats are adjusted to
lower the temperature
overnight to 16C. So far I didn‹t measure the temperature
between the plants in front of the window, but I think it might be lower
than 16C during cold
winter nights. 10C might be too little. I should mention the
house has floor heating and the pots are standing on the floor (windows
are reaching down to
the floor, no windowsill there).
Roots - Orchid roots are very adaptable, they change there
looks and maybe the function in dependence of the surrounding
environment (air, potting medium or
water [hydroponics culture]). But they can‹t be forced into
another medium they have to grow into it otherwise they will normally
rot and die.
Learning from others experiences is good, but think of the fact every
orchid grower knows „ growing exactly the same orchid species in exactly
the same way like another one will not always lead to the same result.
I send you the attached photo from my last mail privately.
Best regards from Germany, Rudolf.


Pete Bice wrote:

>Hi Rudolf

> I am new to orchid-talk. I hope I have found the correct way of
> replying to messages.

> Thank you for all the information. You are right, I do mean in my
> house not my greenhouse. My greenhouse is not heated, but I hope one day
> to reach the level of keeping orchids in a heated greenhouse. But I have
> a lot to learn first.
> I have not found your photos on the website yet. I will try your watering
> technique, I do not know what a cache-pot is,
> but I will look it up.

> How do you maintain a constant temperature of 22C in a house with
> central-heating where the temperature can drop to less than +10C overnight
> in winter? It >has been suggested I try using a ' reptile heat mat' under
> my orchid fishtank. Do you have any comments or suggestions on managing
> temperature?



From: aeranthes
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: pumice
Date: Sun, 01 May 2005 18:40


Congratulations Geoff. It sounds like a very satisfactory day! I'd be over the moon if any of my orchids ever one an award!
Olga - I've never used pumice but I do grow quite a number of orchids this way and I use a mixture of seramis, alpine grit and dynarok (dioralite). They seem to like it. I have seen pumice when I've been abroad and love the look of it. I would go for pieces about the size of the small finger nail! You can see how scientific my methods are! Good-luck in your choice. I'll be very interested to hear how your orchids like pumice. Jean



From: Ron Newstead
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Pumice
Date: Sun, 01 May 2005 18:40


How many kinds have you traced, Olga.
I had thought of getting some from the Azores
Cheers
Ron




From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Orchids do grow on you !!!
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 09:30


Mornin' all,

Most of us will tell newcomers to this wonderful hobby of ours that orchids are not difficult to grow.

I have just 'de-potted' for want of a better word, one of my plants of Dendrobium delicatum.

It was originally three or four canes in a three inch pot, which of course grew very well as this species does. It grew larger, so I dropped it on into a four inch pot and then just let it grow. That was TEN YEARS AGO.

Just a few minutes ago I 'parted' it..........using a large knife, a chisel and a hammer. Now there are six good portions.

It's no wonder that this type of Dendrobium and others like it grow to huge sizes and weigh many pounds/kilos.

Regards, Rocky.



From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Oda George McMahon
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 11:30


I bought a good yellow , with hint of orange and more , Odont on Saturday ,
and it turned out to be George McMahon - the Oda we were talking about
recently. So the cochlioda does have some effect I think. Picture attached.


geoff


From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Oda George McMahon
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 11:35


BTW I have no idea how this compares with the ones shown (?) in the earlier
correspondence, as any pictures sent were rejected by my PC as spam - not
sure why , but life is too short to spend pondering PC irritations.

Geoff


From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Oda George McMahon
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 15:00


And the curious thing is that when my own e-mail arrived, my picture was
shown !


Something to do with format perhaps ?


Geoff



From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: OSGB Show, Wisley - Geoff Hands & Chris Ashman
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 16:45


Geoff - congratulations on your awards at the show. Saw the various plants
but didn't see you :-)

Chris - congratulations on your awards also. Saw the cymbidiums, and you,
but you were very busy - along with Callum - so didn't interrupt!

I apologise if I missed anyone else in the group who won awards.

Regards,

--

Tricia


By the time you can make ends meet, they move the ends.



From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] pumice
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 18:00


Congratulations, you did have a nice day Geoff!
Jean, please could you tell me what kind of plants you grow this way? I want to do this just for Phrags and Paphs. Actually they are in semi-hydro, but I have to repot them twice a year and this is a lot of work. I thought that minerals would stay longuer in a well-condition and also that there were less risks for disease.

Best regards
Olga



From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice
Date: Mon, 02 May 2005 18:15


BonbonsHi Ron,
Well, I have been searching differents pumice (Australia, Turkey, Italy and even in France at the Ardeche region), their composition are not the same one and perhaps they are not all good for orchids. I have bring back from my trips from the Reunion Island, Costa-Rica, Ecuador, Chile and others. Some of them were very good at the begining and afterwards they did not, so I had to save the plants quickly and return to the classical compost. Others were not good from the begining. The question is why? I know that it must be some element in the pumice that is not good for orchids. Am I wrong?

Cherrs
Olga



From: John Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice (second attempt to email!)
Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 14:20


BonbonsHi Olga,
You've obviously done your homework on the composition of pumice. However, be careful when interpreting the components as if they are a kind of recipe list or mixture of available elements.
First, there is a reason of convenience to geologists why analyses of rocks are expressed as oxides of the various elements and it doesn't necessarily (or even usually) mean that there is (say) 12.76% Al2O3 in pumice as a component. In fact, most of the Al will be there locked into the crystalline structure of a silicate called feldspar (a contituent mineral) or in a glass and not as an oxide. Although feldspars do eventuallly break down (to clays) the Al is pretty safely locked up and so you aren't using this material so much as a source of elemental components but as a fairly inert solid frothy low-density medium. In fact, much of pumice is a glass froth with only micro-crystals. There wasn't time for crystals to form before it set solid. I doubt that we would have anxieties over elements leaking out of a glass vessel. Granite would be in the same compositional ballpark but its mechanical/textural qualities are different. In OrchidTalk we have been around this circuit before and I have to admire your efforts in trying to get to grips with what you are using in chemical terms.
John Stanley



From: aeranthes
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: semi hydro
Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 14:30


Olga I grow any orchid which the books and experience tell me like to remain 'evenly moist'. I have Odontoglossums, Oncidiums, Epidendrums, Encyclias, Masdevalias and Sarcochilius growing quite happily this way and probably change them every 2 to 3 years when they need to be put in a slightly larger pot. I did try Miltoniopsis this way but whichever way I grow them they do badly and die! I have given up for the sake of the plants! At first I couldn't grow Masdevalias and my Sarcos did badly until I changed to this method of culture and now they are doing very much better and I have a Sarco in flower now. It is a smallish plant with long flower spike but I am well pleased with it. Jean


From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice (second attempt to email!)
Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 17:10


There is this thing about learning curves which is rarely mentioned - they
can curve up - or down...


Geoff




From: Dr Chong-Yee Khoo
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Bulbophyllum lobbii
Date: Tue, 03 May 2005 22:55


Thought I'd share a photograph I took recently of this clone of Bulbophyllum lobbii 'Far East No 1'.

This is a highly variable species found in Malaysia and Indonesia. My plant is grown in intermediate conditions, in a plastic net basket with a medium of coarse bark, perlag and charcoal. It's given lots of light - possibly more than appropriate.

The flowers unfortunately don't last long - less than a week. But there are two more on the way!

Regards,

Chong-Yee


From: Jon Loose
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice (second attempt to email!)
Date: Wed, 04 May 2005 07:35


I suppose the question is "Why does Olga have problems after a while". My
guesses are that it is either some sort of toxicity (which Ron discounts) or
a nutrient deficiency.


Olga: What do you feed with and how often with your plants in pumice? Do you
rinse through with plain water occasionally? I think these questions might
help get to the root (so to speak) of the problem.


Jon


John Stanley wrote:

You've obviously done your homework on the composition of pumice. However,
be careful when interpreting the components as if they are a kind of recipe
list or mixture of available elements.


In OrchidTalk we have been around this circuit before and I have to admire
your efforts in trying to get to grips with what you are using in chemical
terms




From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Pumice.
Date: Wed, 04 May 2005 09:45


Olga's Pumice,

Must admit that I do not know much about pumice, or that I have taken enough notice about the notes that other members have posted, but I have the feeling that in our type of climate here in the U.K. and other similar climates, that the porosity of the pumice may be the fault.

I liken it to the way that Vandas are grown in the far East. In a compost of broken wall brick. It works well out there, as the porous nature of the pieces soak up moisture, and is then quickly dried by the very warm/hot sunshine.

I did experiment with it here in the U.K., but our weather is vastly different, and the absorbent pieces of brick kept damp far too long. The result was that algae/mould soon grew on the surface of the broken brick.

Hope this information helps.

Regards, Rocky.


From: Tim Fulcher
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Digest 2005 Volume 48
Date: Wed, 04 May 2005 14:50


Beccy,

You could always leave them in situ (which is much better for the
plants and the bank) but peg down a wire grid over them. The orchids
will grow through, but it will be irritating for people trying to dig
them up. However if the council owns the bank, you might want to speak
to their environment officer first, or contact English Nature for
further ideas and suggestions.

Tim

On 28 Apr, 2005, at 17:09, Orchid Talk Digest wrote:

Beccy Holmes wrote:
>
> Hi there everyone,
>
> A friend of mine is very excited about the Early Purple Orchids
> growing on
> the bank outside his house. However twice now someone has come along
> and
> stolen them, leaving only one or two plants. He's wondering if, to
> preserve
> them, he can lift them and move them to somewhere less conspicuous and
> how
> to propagate them. I've had a non-exhaustive look on the internet but
> wondered if anyone else here could help? Are they happy to be divided,
> do
> they grow easily from seed and is seed available commercially?
>
> Many thanks in advance,
> B


From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Identification.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 11:15


Mornin' all,

Friend of mine sent me a letter and three photos of an orchid which they bought in Florida in March 2003, in a one inch pot. They are complete novices, but they sure have done well.

Only trouble is..........they do not have a name for it.

Can any of you please help.

No doubt we all have something very similar, but if any of you can maybe put a correct name to it, or perhaps suggest what it comes very close to then I am sure they will be very pleased. Especially id we can give them the parentage etc.

Kind regards Rocky.



From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Identification.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 17:30


Looks a lot like BPI Red pepper on the first picture ( the red is usually an
orangey kind . ) The pinker pictures look a bit different. The brasso I
think ( have not looked it up) is nodosa ,

Geoff


Roger Grier wrote:


Mornin' all,

Friend of mine sent me a letter and three photos of an orchid which they
bought in Florida in March 2003, in a one inch pot. They are complete
novices, but they sure have done well.

Only trouble is..........they do not have a name for it.

Can any of you please help.

No doubt we all have something very similar, but if any of you can maybe put
a correct name to it, or perhaps suggest what it comes very close to then I
am sure they will be very pleased. Especially id we can give them the
parentage etc.



From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Identification.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 18:25


Hi Rocky,

It is definetely a Potinara. However, that is as far
as I can go with my identification!

Cheers,

Francis.




From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Searching for oor Wild Orchids.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 18:30


Hello everyone,

As it is the start of the Orchid Hunting Season I thought I might show three photos of orchids in the leaf stage to hopefully help anyone who is new to this wonderful hobby.

Tomorrow, weather behaving itself I hope to go out and photograph two of our orchids that are in bloom, namely, the Early Purple Orchid, and the Green Veined Orchid. Then I will post the photos with identification remarks that will help people to know what they are looking at.

Hopefully my remarks will let you know for sure what you have seen, unlike many books that do not remark on the obvious.

First photo is of a hybrid with the Common Spotted Orchid. Markings not so prominent.

Second photo is of a hybrid with the either the Common Spotted, and/or the Heath Spotted and maybe a Marsh orchid. Notice the circular ring markings. Some people call it the Leopard Marsh Orchid. "Get's difficult don't it "!!! [ 'ampshire dialect]

Third photo is all Common Spotted. Note the colour of the markings, and the 'sausage' shaped markings. And observe how hardly any of the markings sit across the central vein. Some of them nudge up to it, but they do not sit astride it. Also, the bottom two leaves of the Common Spotted are always much wider than the leaves above, and they have a blunt curved end. The other leaves have a very sharp pointed end, and they are much thinner.

The Heath Spotted Orchid's leaves ALL have a pointed end. Hopefully I will have photos to show you tomorrow, along with anything else of interest.

Regards, Rocky.

Extra note: I know Tricia likes us to send photos compressed to about 30/40Kbts, but am I correct in saying that the more 'material' in a photo makes a larger Kbs image when compressed? I compress mine in Corel Photo Paint. I ask this question because if we can all help each other to come to some accepted and agreed method for the compression job then so be it.



From: aeranthes
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Roger
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 19:05


Your friends orchids are beautiful Rocky. First of all I though maybe the second was a barkeria hybrid but having searched and looked at many I don't think it is as the shape of the flower is different. Then I thought the leaves are very like the strappy leaf dendrobiums (note my botanical expertise here!) Again I couldn't find anything exactly like those pictured. An interesting exercise for me but no help to you or them - sorry. Jean



From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] MInerals.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 19:50


Many thanks to John and Jean for their great help. I will be starting my test with pumice in two weeks. I'll let you know how this works.

Best regards
Olga


From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Pumice.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 19:50


Hi Geoff,
I do not understand what do you mean in your mail about curves, could you please explain this to me?

Cheers
Olga


From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Pumice.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 20:00


Hi Jon
The answer to your question is yes, I feed a litlle bit each week (Masdevallia & Pleuro) but I also rinse them with pure water. Some friends told me that there must be a toxicity too and this was the reason why I was trying to learn more about the composition of pumice.
My culture program is very soft in winter (about 200 microsiemmens) because they don't have enough light and that temperature goes between 16C°(night) and 22C° (day). Later in the year, when I have more sun (light & heat) I increase till 400. This is only valable for Masdevallia and Pleuro.

Thanks again

Olga


From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Pumice.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 20:15


Hi Rocky,
May be you are also right, perhaps the conditions here doesn't work good enough, but there is an objection: I know somebody who grows practically more than a half of his orchids in pumice and his plants are very beautiful, but he is not very talkative...He lives about 400km far from me in France.

Best regards
Olga



From: Erica
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Identification.
Date: Thu, 05 May 2005 22:15

Hi Rocky:
I think that is very close to Brasavola from Perú. I don't know the name of the specie.
Regards
Erica
Lima-Perú



From: Jon Loose
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice.
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 09:55


Hi Olga

I suspect, but have no scientific evidence, that some ’inert‹ media may
inactivate some of the trace minerals and so require higher levels of
feeding or nutrient mixes with good supplies of the rarer minerals. I would
have thought that rinsing would help to counteract any toxicity but I
suppose it could even take away the nutrients which counteract toxicity.
Aluminium can cause problems, I seem to remember that it competes with
calcium in the plant cells and it probably has an effect on other mineral
nutrition. It would be interesting to take say 20 plants of a particular
Masdevallia and compare different treatments. Unfortunately I don‹t have
such a thing.

Jon



From: aeranthes
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: orchids and pumice
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 10:35


Thanks for the photos Rocky. I'll have a better idea of which is which now. Olga I would be very interested to hear about your experiment with pumice in 6 months or so as I'm always looking for the 'perfect' medium! Jean


From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re:Learning Curves ,
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 11:35


I am sorry Olga, it was intended as a joke.

Learning curves are expected to curve upwards ( that is , one learns more)
but my joke suggested that things can go the other way , and the more one
learns, the less one actually knows - or the more one gets confused, which
comes to the same thing.


Geoff





From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] orchids and pumice
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 18:30


Well Jean, it seems that we are looking for the holy Grail. Rendez-vous in 6 months...

Cheers
Olga



From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice.
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 18:45


Hi Jon,
If you are right about Aluminium's toxicity, this means that I will have to find with what element this interaction doesn't match. Very interesting if there is competition with calcium because I have RO water and I add calcium separetely, it could be perhaps one overdose...
Anyway I will start with just one Masdevallia, one Pleuro and one hybrid Phrag.

Many thanks
Olga


From: Olga Caussade
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re:Learning Curves ,
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 19:00

Thanks Geoff, I understand now what you meant. The more one learns, the less one actually knows, this is so true, particularly when you are curious. But on the other side all this makes you read and learn a lot of things all the time...

Regards
Olga.


From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Bulbophyllum lobbii
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 19:30


Hi Chong -Yee

That's a super photo of a very classy orchid. I've had a B L languishing at
the back of one of the benches doing precious little for the last couple of
years and your photo has reminded me why I bought it in the first place and
spurred me on to give it some attention!


Andy


"Dr Chong-Yee Khoo" wrote:


> Thought I'd share a photograph I took recently of this clone of
> Bulbophyllum lobbii 'Far East No 1'.

> This is a highly variable species found in Malaysia and Indonesia. My
> plant is grown in intermediate conditions, in a plastic net basket with a
> medium of coarse bark, perlag and charcoal. It's given lots of light -
> possibly more than appropriate.
>
> The flowers unfortunately don't last long - less than a week. But there
> are two more on the way!
>
> Regards,
>
> Chong-Yee


From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice.
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 20:15


Hi Olga, Jon, Geoff, Rocky, Uncle Tom Cobbley and all!
May I come back on the issue of toxic elements and substrate/soil composition?
First let me say that I do not claim expertise in plant nutrition (I suspect geoff could handle that side better), but I do have a little geological knowledge and, although little knowledge can be dangerous, it may offer food for thought.

Any mineral/crushed rock/pebble substrate will most likely be a selection from clay, sand, gravel and lime. Lime we know about (calcium, magnesium carbonate and its component elements may escape due to the solubility of carbonate). Clay is essentially a natural breakdown product of fairly complex silicate minerals which contain silicon, oxygen, aluminium, possibly calcium and sodium and potassiumbut largely 'locked in'. However, its main quality is its water holding property and its curious facility of expansion or shrinkage according to water content. S

ilt, sand and (gravel and coarser fragments) are often thought (wrongly) to be simply of quartz grains. Although some sand is quartz sand, much also contains grains of feldspar (containing locked-in aluminium) and mica and when grains are as large as (say) a pea, they will almost certainly be a proportion of multi-mineral rock fragments. The main difference between clay and sands (and gravel etc) is that the latter have pore spaces between grains and water can pass through. However, I doubt that we orchid growers are big into clay which holds its water until evaporation removes it.

The point I make is that is is difficult to imagine a mineral substrate (even a fired-clay pot) that will be deficient in Al unless it is deliberately selected like a pure quartz sand or crushed quartz rock. Perhaps diatomite (a biogenic pure siliceous deposit) is another Al-free substance that is encountered in our hobby. I can imagine a few rocks that would lean towards high quantities of specific nasty elements (copper or lead?) but I doubt that we'd come across them. Volcanic glasses (of which pumice is a frothy variety rich in silica and basaltic scoria is another but with more iron and magnesium) are unlikely (am I correct Geoff?) to be a great problem chemically. What they may have are properties of drainage/water holding that we might value in our artificial habitats.

Maybe Geoff, with your hydrponics knowledge, can confirm or contradict my views.
John Stanley



From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re:Learning Curves ,
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 20:20

Geoff,
you will recall Bernard Miles in his pre-Mermaid life stage monologues. In the polite BBC days his phrase, translated from the Latin was "don't let the so-n-sos" grind you down". One might add " and reverse your learning curves".
John




From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Identification.
Date: Fri, 06 May 2005 20:50


Hello Erica,

Thanks for your reply. The three photos are of the same plant. The last photo shows the flowers that are very old and nearly over, hence the different colour. I thought it was one of the Brassocattleya hybrids, like the famous BC Binosa types.

Kind regards, Rocky.

How is lovely Peru with all the wonderful orchids. Maybe I might get there one day.




From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Identification.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 09:10


Mornin' all,

I recently sent three photos of an orchid which my friend grew and wanted to know the name of. I'm sorry that I forgot to say that the three photos were all of the same plant. The 'reddish' flowers were taken when they were past there best, and just to show the difference in colour from what one would expect to see.

Francis thinks that it is a Potinara, while I thought that it resembled a Brossacattleya possibly of the BC. Binosa 'Kirk' type of cross.

Do any of you have any more ideas please.

Regards, Rocky.



From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Cattleya identification
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 13:20


Can anyone provide the name of this cattleya hybrid? Presumably it has C aurantiaca in the background somewhere. The pseudobulbs are about 30cms tall and it produces heads of 10 or 12 small red/orange flowers.


Andy


From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 14:15


Geoff , with his hydroponic knowledge , bows to superior minds who can
understand all this ; I just choose a material which I hope is reasonably
inert (Perlite or the clay pebbles sold under various trade names ) , and
which in my simple mind will not decompose or wash away in the water due to
its solubility , feed with what happens to be about the cheapest hydroponic
nutrient available ( Ionic Bloom ) and if a plant looks unhappy, repot it in
something elseŶ.

But thanks for the compliment John.


Geoff

Ps and see my posting about new facts about bark , to follow.




From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Identification.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 14:20


Not a potinara - which has to be a cross of Cattleya, Laelia, Brassovola (
almost certainly B.digbyana) and Sophronaria ( 99% certain to be
S.grandiflora). . Nothing - absolutely nothing - ever bred by any orchid
breeder from that combination would look like the pictures shown.

The sepals are too long and too narrow. The lip is too big without a trace
of fimbriation. Ptinaras are always miniature cattleyas, intended to be red
, and usually are.


. No way . Forget it..


Geoff


Roger Grier wrote:

I recently sent three photos of an orchid which my friend grew and wanted to
know the name of. I'm sorry that I forgot to say that the three photos were
all of the same plant. The 'reddish' flowers were taken when they were past
there best, and just to show the difference in colour from what one would
expect to see.

Francis thinks that it is a Potinara, while I thought that it resembled a
Brossacattleya possibly of the BC. Binosa 'Kirk' type of cross.

Do any of you have any more ideas please.




From: Erica
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Identification.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 16:20

Hola Rocky:
Yes Perú is wondefull. My husband and I went around many orchids habitats.We know a lot of places and there are full orchids (Epidendrums, Lycastes, Masdevallias, Pleurothallis, etc) and we saw a mountain full Phragmipediums.Is increible.
In november, we will take to the habitat a 15 persons from Suecia to see orchids (8 days in auto off road 4x4).
I have a littlel laboratory for Propagación in vitro.Only peruvian orchids.Sorry for my bad english.
Regards
Erica



From: Tricia Garner
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Cattleya identification
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 16:35


Andy Mckeown wrote:

> Can anyone provide the name of this cattleya hybrid? Presumably it has C
> aurantiaca in the background somewhere. The pseudobulbs are about 30cms
> tall and it produces heads of 10 or 12 small red/orange flowers.

It looks to me like Sophrolaeliocattleya Jewel Box which is a cross between
C. aurantiaca and Slc. Anzac. I have Jewel Box "Scheherezade" which fits
your description; another nice one is Jewel Box "Dark Waters" which has
darker flowers (not surprisingly!).

--

Tricia


No one ever says "It's only a game," when their team is winning.



From: nancy
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: Bulbophyllum lobbii
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 17:10


Hi Chong-Yee -
When you say 'probably too much sun' -= how much is
that? I have two hybrids with lobbii, and while the
vegetative growth is fairly rampant, blooming is
uninspiring.
I suppose I need to 'abuse' them a bit, too.
Regards - Nancy


~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Measure twice; cut once."
Nancy's first rule of woodworking
"When it comes down to marrying,
better speak once, think twice."
George Thorogood



From: Ron Newstead
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cattleya identification
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 17:25


30 cms?
That's about a foot!
Ron



From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Early Purple orchid.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 17:30


Hi all,

Yesterday, my wife Mary and I spent a few hours searching for wild orchids in our native New Forest. Plenty of sunshine, but a strong wind was blowing and none too warm either. Nevertheless, we did find some very good specimens in bloom.

Today I will just concentrate on the Early Purple orchid. Tomorrow I will tell you about the Green Veined orchid.

I do hope that my three photos and explanations will ensure that anyone can tell for sure what they are looking at.

The photo of the bottom part of the plant shows the typical leaf formation and the markings that are found on the Early Purple orchid. As you can see, they are roughly circular in shape, are of a purplish/black colour, and most important, note that the markings will sit astride of the central vein. Many other orchids that have markings will not do this. Also, and equally as important, notice that some of the leaves do have markings on the underside of the leaf. I purposely bent a leaf over to show you.

The 'Flowers' photo 41.6KB, shows a typical flower spike. The flowers do not have that many markings on the lip. This of course differs with nearly every flower. Note the sepals held high over the back of the flower, and the spur which points upwards.

Last photo 'Flowers' 42.7KB Shows a closer look at a lighter coloured flower, with more lip markings. Note also that the high-held sepals have a twist to them.

I now hope that any of you who have not been entirely sure what they have seen, will be able to put a name to the plant.

Final recognition point is this..........get down on your hands and knees and have a damned good sniff. Yes, this orchid does have a 'fragrance'. Some say it smells like Tomcats, others like Mary and I, will say that it smells the same as the shrub in our gardens. Namely the 'Flowering currant' the Ribes. I quite like the fragrance, it's oddly pungent.

Well, there you are, that's the Early Purple Orchid.

Regards, Rocky.


From: Andy Mckeown
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Cattleya identification
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 17:50


Thanks for the suggestion Tricia. However I also have SLC Jewel Box
Scheherezade and it is not that. This is a much taller plant -over a foot-
which I would not expect from a sophronitis cross, and the flowers are
small - maybe one and a half inches across.

Andy


From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Green-veined orchid.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 18:25


Hello everyone,

Yesterdays search was very successful and so here are some photos of the 'Green-veined orchid'. Some books and people refer to this orchid as the 'Green-winged orchid', but as you can see, it does not have solid green wings, but it does has 'Green veins', and they run through the sepals and the petals.

The size can vary quite a lot. On open short turf, wind and weather exposed, we found them to be about two to three inches tall, but in sheltered spots, alongside gorse and other shrubs they were up to about four inches tall. Taller ones can be found but they intend to grow up through wild rose etc., so they are 'pulled' up for the light.

The leaves which have wintered through are still there in all their glory. The colour can vary a great deal, and we were lucky to find just one pinkish type, and this does show up the green veins very well.

Note the small bracts that curl around the ovary and the spur.

In the photo [40.7KB] have a look at the bottom flower on the left hand side. Note the 180 degree twist in the ovary, shown by the lines from which the pod splits when ripe. I know it is slightly out of focus, but, it was blowing very hard, and I was lying full length on the ground with the occasional gorse spike sticking in my knees and hands. The joys of nature !!!!!

Regards, Rocky.


From: Roger Grier
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Odes to our Wild Orchids.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 18:30


Might just as well let you share in some of my Odes that I make up from time to time, and as we have just looked at the Early Purple, and the Green-veined orchids I thought that I had better post them.

Rocky.


From: John W Stanley
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Re: Pumice.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 18:50


But Geoff,
You do make the point I should've emphasised; what really matters is what's in the water we provide. That's where most of spare elements will be sloshing around in a form that may do our plants harm.

That's solubility man!. . . . . as they might have said half a C ago!
Cheers
John



From: Geoffrey Hands
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] new facts about bark.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 20:40


I learnt something new about bark recently ; it happened like this ; I was
out on a walk with my local Natural History Society - which has some very
knowledgable folk among the membership , and we had stopped to look at some
lichen growing on a tree - though to be a new species to the County ( i.e.
never previously recorded in Dorset , and I commented that some trees were
covered in all kinds of mosses and lichens, and others had none - and the
answer came immediately that the bark of beech - which we happened to be
looking at - is very nutrient rich , whereas the bark of other species ( and
I forget what it was which had nothing on it , although growing between a
pair of beeches - it may have been ash - is very nutrient poor. A similar
explanation tells why the epiphytic fern ( Polypodium something -or-other )
grows so well on oak in the western half of Britain (the western half
because the eastern half is too dry , but mainly on oak because of
nutrients available from the oak bark )


Translating this to bark for growing orchids, it will be plain that some
trees are going to have very suitable bark , and others are going to be
useless - and this is why . It seems that experts in the lower plants ( the
non-vascular ones) - if there are such people ( these bryophyte, moss,
lichen etc. experts are in fact also the best botanists in this Society)
are routinely aware of the nutrient value of bark of British trees.


We did go on to talk about using this info to select bark for orchid growing
, but it did not lead to any useful results, since even if I were to tell
you that the bark of say the European lime tree is the most nutrient ricjh
, the possibilities of finding a supply suitably shredded or chipped are
pretty poor !.


But , very interesting and inn fact enlightening ,I thought


Geoff




From: francis quesada pallares
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] RE: Identification.
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 21:35


I based my choice in the Potinara Hoku Gem that I have
recently bought from Plested Orchids.

The plant long leaves, as well as the shape of the
flower do match perfectly my plant. The only different
thing is the flower colour. Mine is yellow/orange with
some darker orange spots on the lip.

But then again, I can also be totally wrong, as I have
only been growing orchids for over a year, and I'm
still getting to know the different plants available.

Francis.

PS It could also be that I got a plant with a wrong
label?



From: Robert J. Richter
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cattleya identification
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 22:40


Looks like Lc Chit Chat, although chit chat is a little lighter

Robert J. Richter


From: Robert J. Richter
To: Orchid Talk List
Subject: Re: [OrchidTalk] Cattleya identification
Date: Sat, 07 May 2005 22:40


by the way, mine is virused, willing to sell a division? if your in the US

Robert J. Richter

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